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    2.Officially Sanctioned Crime in China, He Qinglian
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    Nine Commentaries on The Communist Party, the Epochtimes
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    Reporters Without Borders said in it’s 2005 special report titled “Xinhua: the world’s biggest propaganda agency”, that “Xinhua remains the voice of the sole party”, “particularly during the SARS epidemic, Xinhua has for last few months been putting out news reports embarrassing to the government, but they are designed to fool the international community, since they are not published in Chinese.”
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Archive for the ‘spy’ Category

China High-ranking Military Spies Woo Australia Business Leaders

Posted by Author on May 26, 2013


Some of Australia’s most influential business leaders were feted in China by an intelligence platform of the People’s Liberation Army, a Fairfax investigation has revealed.

Andrew Forrest, who touted his talks with the leaders last month as a lesson on how to be friendly with China, was joined by the heads of four of the five big banks, Qantas and the Business Council of Australia, and the former Australian ambassador to China, Geoff Raby, who is a director of Mr Forrest’s iron ore company, Fortescue. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Australia, China, Economy, military, Politics, spy, World | Comments Off on China High-ranking Military Spies Woo Australia Business Leaders

Court: 3 NYU Chinese researchers took bribes from China

Posted by Author on May 21, 2013


Three New York University researchers from China divulged results from a federally funded study to Chinese competitors in exchange for tuition, rent and other expenses, federal prosecutors said Monday.

Yudong Zhu, a U.S.-educated NYU professor, and Xing Yang, a lab engineer, were released on bail after appearing in federal court in Manhattan to face commercial bribery and other charges. They left court without speaking to reporters.

The third defendant, postdoctoral fellow Ye Li, was at large. Authorities believe he flew to China before charges were brought. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Law, Overseas Chinese, People, spy, USA, World | Comments Off on Court: 3 NYU Chinese researchers took bribes from China

Ex-Chinese spy says Canadian politicians are targets

Posted by Author on December 2, 2011


GATINEAU, Que. — A flirtatious email exchange between a Tory MP and a Chinese journalist has to be taken seriously, because China views foreign politicians as top targets, a former Chinese spy said Wednesday.

Defector Li Fengzhi said agents of China’s Ministry of State Security — where he used to work — often focus on politicians.

Li was commenting on the case of Conservative MP Bob Dechert, who has admitted to sending flirty emails to a female correspondent for the state-controlled Xinhua news agency. Dechert is parliamentary secretary to Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Politics, spy, Women, World | Comments Off on Ex-Chinese spy says Canadian politicians are targets

Lust is Chinese spies’ favoured weapon

Posted by Author on December 2, 2011


OTTAWA – A former Canadian diplomat has blown the lid off the Chinese government’s use of sex to ensnare business people and others, and then pump them to divulge secrets.

“The big thing that China is after is technology and information and military secrets,” Brian McAdam told a corporate espionage conference in Gatineau, Que.

“They are really targeting foreign scientists and engineers in a major way.”

McAdam said Chinese intelligence officials have perfected the “honey trap” – using agents to seduce visiting business people, scientists, or politicians while secretly videotaping their sexual encounter. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Canada, China, Politics, spy | Comments Off on Lust is Chinese spies’ favoured weapon

Chinese Military Wanted Motorola Secrets Carried by China-bound Woman

Posted by Author on November 9, 2011


The petite woman, bearing short, pixie-styled hair, was barely audible in a federal courtroom Monday.

Hanjuan Jin, 41, answered “yes” when asked if she, a former Motorola software engineer, wanted her economic espionage trial to happen before a judge and not a jury.

With that, federal prosecutors tore into Jin, saying she purposely stole trade secrets from the Schaumburg-based tech giant so she could pass on the much-desired cellular technology to the Chinese military and a business in China.

Jin is accused of downloading hundreds of documents from Motorola Inc. — including ones the company says it considers trade secrets — as she negotiated a job in China with a competing firm. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Business, China, Economy, Law, News, People, Social, spy, World | Comments Off on Chinese Military Wanted Motorola Secrets Carried by China-bound Woman

The Xinhua News Agency Correspondent over Amorous Emails Leaves Canada On ‘scheduled vacation’

Posted by Author on September 15, 2011


OTTAWA — The Chinese journalist at the centre of the furor over amorous emails from Conservative MP Bob Dechert has left Toronto and has returned to China, her supervisor says.

Xinhua News Agency correspondent Shi Rong went on a “scheduled vacation,” according to Zeng Hu, the state media agency’s North America bureau chief. Zeng said he didn’t know if Shi would be coming back to Toronto after her trip.

“She wanted to have a vacation for some time before,” Zeng said Thursday from the Xinhua bureau in New York City.

Zeng said he doesn’t know when Shi left but said he believes she went back to Beijing.

Emails allegedly hacked from Shi’s Gmail account revealed personal exchanges between her and Dechert, the MP for Mississauga-Erindale, Ont. The emails were forwarded to about 250 recipients on Shi’s contact list last week. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Media, News, People, Politics, spy, Women, World | Comments Off on The Xinhua News Agency Correspondent over Amorous Emails Leaves Canada On ‘scheduled vacation’

Chinese journalist wanted a divorce to continue relationship with Canadian MP, e-mail claims

Posted by Author on September 14, 2011


A Chinese journalist wanted to get a divorce to pursue a relationship with Conservative MP Bob Dechert, an e-mail allegedly sent by the woman’s husband claims.

The person who hacked e-mails between the Mississauga MP and Xinhua News correspondent Shi Rong appended the note at the top of the package of e-mails, which were forwarded last week to 250 recipients on Shi’s contacts list.

“In order to love this MP, Shi Rong has not hesitated to ask to end her marriage while posted abroad,” the note said in Chinese. “This is the Shi Rong you should know about.“ Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Journalist, Media, News, People, spy, World, Xinhua | Comments Off on Chinese journalist wanted a divorce to continue relationship with Canadian MP, e-mail claims

Xinhua Reporter Shi Rong Wanted Divorce for Canadian MP, Email Alleges

Posted by Author on September 14, 2011


A reporter with the Chinese state-run Xinhua News Agency wanted to divorce her husband to “continue her love affair” with Canadian member of Parliament Bob Dechert, says the email sent from her account to scores of government and media contacts last week.

The email says, in Chinese: “To continue her love affair with this member of Parliament, Shi Rong pitilessly asked to end her marriage while stationed overseas. This is the Shi Rong you should know about.”

The email sender leaves no name, but Shi has told the Globe and Mail that her account was hacked by her husband. Dechert himself said he believed the account had been hacked “as a part of an ongoing domestic dispute.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Canada, China, Journalist, News, People, Politics, spy, Women, World | Comments Off on Xinhua Reporter Shi Rong Wanted Divorce for Canadian MP, Email Alleges

Canadian MP’s ‘flirtatious’ e-mails to China’s state-controlled news reporter exposed

Posted by Author on September 9, 2011


A senior Harper government MP with foreign affairs duties has apologized for sending “flirtatious” e-mails to a journalist with China’s state-controlled news agency, a revelation that’s embarrassed Canada’s ruling Conservatives.

Bob Dechert, Conservative MP for Missisauga-Erindale, scrambled Friday to explain amorous e-mails he’d sent in 2010 to Shi Rong, a Toronto correspondent with Xinhua News Agency.

Mr. Dechert is parliamentary secretary to Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Canada, China, News, People, Politics, spy, World | Comments Off on Canadian MP’s ‘flirtatious’ e-mails to China’s state-controlled news reporter exposed

Chinese general Jin Yinan’s sensitive spy talk leaked online

Posted by Author on August 30, 2011


Footage of a Chinese general discussing sensitive spying cases has been leaked on to YouTube in what appears to be an embarrassing failure of secrecy for the usually tightlipped military.

It was not clear when or where Major General Jin Yinan made the comments and China’s defence ministry did not respond to questions about the video. Calls to the National Defence University, where Jin is a lecturer, went unanswered.

While some of the cases had been announced before, few details had been released, while others involving the military had been entirely secret. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Media, Official, People, spy, Video, World | Comments Off on Chinese general Jin Yinan’s sensitive spy talk leaked online

U.S. Chinese Democracy Leader Liu Gang Says Wife a Communist Party Spy

Posted by Author on May 29, 2011


(Epochtimes)– A former leader of the 1989 Tiananmen student movement has accused his wife of being a spy for the Chinese Communist Party in a series of Twitter posts and online blog entries over the weekend. His wife denies the accusation.

Liu Gang lives in exile in the United States and is a member of the overseas Chinese democracy movement. He met his wife four years ago online, and in their first face-to-face meeting she proposed marriage.

Since she was young, pretty, a graduate from a top business school in the United States, and a manager in a major firm, he agreed—he later said he thought her sudden proposal to him was “the American way.” Her name is Guo Yinghua, but in his Twitter messages Liu now calls her “Officer Guo.” Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Activist, China, News, People, Politics, spy, World | Comments Off on U.S. Chinese Democracy Leader Liu Gang Says Wife a Communist Party Spy

Spy and Sex Scandal Implicates Chinese Woman and S. Korean Diplomats

Posted by Author on March 12, 2011


By Sophia Fang & Gisela Sommer, Epoch Times Staff-

Three South Korean diplomats at the consulate in Shanghai are allegedly involved in a sex-for-favors scandal with a 33-year-old married Chinese woman, said by some news sources to be the granddaughter of the late Deng Xiaoping, China’s former paramount leader. Korean reports indicate the woman has obtained classified information including the phone numbers of high-ranking Korean officials.

Mrs. Deng Xinmin is married to a Korean national, referred to as Mr. J., who works in Shanghai. Mr. J. contacted authorities after he discovered sensitive information on his wife’s USB stick. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Asia, China, East China, News, People, Politics, shanghai, South Korea, spy, Women, World | 1 Comment »

State-sponsored Cyber-spies from China penetrate UK Foreign Office computers

Posted by Author on February 4, 2011


Richard Norton-Taylor and Julian Borger in Munich, guardian.co.uk, Friday 4 February 2011-

China has penetrated the Foreign Office’s internal communications in the most audacious example yet of the growing threat posed by state-sponsored cyber-attacks, it emerged tonight.

William Hague told a security conference in Munich that the FO repelled the attack last month from “a hostile state intelligence agency”. Although the foreign secretary did not name the country behind the attacks, intelligence sources familiar with the incidents made it clear he was referring to China. The sources did not want to be identified because of the sensitive nature of the issue. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, hacking, Internet, News, People, Politics, Social, spy, Technology, UK, World | Comments Off on State-sponsored Cyber-spies from China penetrate UK Foreign Office computers

China’s Communist Party rules through spies, here is how to get rid of them

Posted by Author on August 6, 2010


by Wei Jingsheng, via asianews.it, 08/04/2010 –

Washington (AsiaNews) – Ruling with spies is one of the core pillars of the Chinese Communist Party’s rule.  It succeeded with the traditional methods, both Chinese and foreign, as well as ancient and current methods.  Besides an effort to control the politics of its enemies by using economic sanctions and buy-ins, the Chinese Communists even developed spy methods, which are called “redirect back to China after exporting overseas”.

In an effort to destroy various opposition activities, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is not only trying to gain access and information within the opposition, but also putting in effort to deliver faulty information by detouring long distances.  In the past 20 years, the scale of the democratic movement and religious and Falun Gong groups’ activities have reached a magnificent level.  Thus, the Communist Party’s spying scales and technologies are also rising with the tide, to a ubiquitous degree with a high technical proficiency.  It has become the main pillar in support the rule of the Chinese Communist Party.

There are two main types of spying activities by the CCP against the people’s resistance.  The first could be summarized as “to pull out, then strike in”; while the second could be summarized as “to put in, then strike out”.  The purposes of both methods are the same, with similar methods.  However, their directions and targets are somewhat different.  The related CCP departments in charge might also be special depending on circumstances.

Here is an example of a typical method of  “to pull out, then strike in”.  It uses the weakness of some people inside China to pull those within the democratic movement or members of the religious groups who already have a name recognition out, to work for the Communists’ regime.  Then, it will use them to control and even damage the opposition organizations inside and/or outside China.

Some of these people are even already exposed inside China, and thus lack much value there.  However, the CCP then uses its capacity in the media to raise their reputation, then to get them outside China.  Because of the lack of flown communication between China and the overseas, our friends overseas do not know the situation inside China well.  These new people would pretend to be steadfast democracy activists overseas, to continuously dupe our overseas friends and the international media.  They would even use communication tools that are already monitored and supervised to make frequent communication with people inside China, and to sell out the democracy activists inside China.  This is their basic work.

Besides this basic work, there is a higher-level work that takes advantage of the fact that our people inside China do not know overseas people well, and often have a wrongful mentality of blind trust in overseas.  This allows these overseas agents to direct the opposition movement inside China.  The result is that the opposition movement inside China follows the wrong path, meanwhile exposing itself to the intelligence organizations of the Chinese Communist Party.  Thus, the opposition groups would either be eliminated rather quickly, or become a masked body snatcher to let the CCP to destroy other opposition groups.

There was an opposition organization that was well known both inside and outside China that went down exactly such a path.  Some of its veteran members could not take various inhuman tortures in jail, and thus surrendered themselves.  They admitted to be wrong and yielded to the CCP police.  This would be a very normal situation.  After all, how many people could suffer the inhuman tortures of the CCP?  I am sympathetic to all these people who had to surrender themselves, not for any other reason than just because they are also human.  To surrender is normal.  More or less, it is not a very fair treatment to receive criticism after one had to surrender.

Many people surrendered, so they were released in advance, or released quickly.  Although they surrendered themselves, they did not defect to the enemy, did not sell out our friends, and did not work for the spy agencies of the Chinese Communists.  Although they do not dare or do not want to continue the opposition activities, but at least they are still friends of the democratic movement, or at least personal friends.

However, there is a small portion of these people who either because their vulnerable points were grasped by the CCP police, or because they want to maintain the heroic image of themselves, gradually yield themselves to the despotic power of the police.  In the beginning, they only do smaller things for the police, which do not violate their own conscience, but gradually the scale is expanded to become traitors and evil as to sell out their friends and abet the evildoers.

They use the excuse of “having different opinions” as a shield for all the things they are doing.  In addition, they assume the wrongful yet popular opinion both inside and outside China, that only evidence proved in the courts are the standard for us to judge people.  Thus, there isn’t anyone who could confirm these type of agents’ identities, and it is difficult to warn other friends to avoid the persecution brought on by these agents.  This process has directly resulted in damage to the democratic movement and religious groups both inside and outside China.

However, not everyone in the opposition is a fool.  As the saying goes, time will testify the truth.  Gradually, these traitors expose themselves.  When they lose their value to cheat inside China, the CCP uses the media to send them overseas to continuously cheat the international public opinion, in an effort to influence international society’s support to the Chinese democratic movement.

What these people do far surpasses the average intelligence collection.  They have become the main supporters of the pro-CCP politicians in the West.  With the financial support of the Western big businesses, for the common targets of the CCP and these big businesses, they are lobbying around the Western governments and parliaments as either professionals or seeming to be amateurs.  They join in force together and work hard to maintain the CCP’s rule, as well as the super profits of the big businesses.

Within the so-called overseas Chinese democratic movement circle, there are a few people like that, who once had others’ trust yet now carry this special mission.  When the political circle in the West is facing some major dispute with the CCP, in particular when there is some dispute related to Chinese human rights and democracy, we see some well recognized people came out to speak in favour of the Chinese Communist Party.  Thus on key disputed issues during the crucial times, they foiled the side that supports Chinese human rights and democracy.

These people often make faulty testimony and to prove the pro-CCP views were correct within the rank of human rights and democracy, thus seriously influenced the view points of the politicians and people who support Chinese democracy and human rights yet do not know China issues that well.  These people have not only contributed to the CCP’s media war in the West, but also indirectly influenced the opposition movement inside China.

There is a simple yet effective method to distinguish this type of person with a special mission.  That is to check on their true political stand, especially their actions on the disputed issues during the crucial times, instead of reading the evaluation by the Western media.  More than ten years ago, the overseas Chinese democracy movement already started applying this kind of method to prevent further damage by these agents.

There is an important principle carried out by our Overseas Chinese Democracy Coalition.  This principle is to examine one’s stand and action, instead of valuing one’s past credits.  Whenever the Chinese democracy movement is facing an important issue and important turning point, there are agents jumping out to sing a different tune or to hold a stand of opposition.  If our democratic friends could see and understand the current main targets of the democracy movement, it would be fairly easy to recognize these special agents who jump out enthusiastically.  Some people do not see the situation clearly, or lack a judging capacity, while some veterans with good intelligence still appear to lack understanding.  The latter might not be truly confused, but of major suspicion.

There is a frustration among many of our friends in the past years, which is that even if we know who the special agents are, we just could not do much.  We cannot do what happened between the Communist Party and KuoMinTang back in the last century, when they cultivated special “traitor elimination task forces” to execute all the special agents they knew.  Nowadays, this could be called terrorism by the international society.  As a matter of fact, there were special agents giving such suggestions to the overseas democracy movement, but we were not fooled. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Activist, China, News, People, Politics, Social, spy, World | Comments Off on China’s Communist Party rules through spies, here is how to get rid of them

Chinese influence on Canada runs deep: MP

Posted by Author on July 30, 2010


Renata D’aliesio, Postmedia News; With Files From Katherine Laidlaw, via The National Post, Friday, Jul. 30, 2010 –

China’s influence over Western politicians runs deeper than controversial claims made by the head of Canada’s spy agency, Conservative MP Rob Anders says.

In a recent interview with Epoch Times, an international newspaper founded by Falun Gong supporters, Mr. Anders suggested politicians and government officials from Canada and other countries are being wooed with extravagant gifts, beautiful women and too-good-to-be-true business deals.

“The reach is deep, and it’s very unfortunate,” the Calgary MP told the newspaper.

“I would argue that I’ve seen things happen on a federal level as well in our own government.”

Richard Fadden, director of Canadian Security Intelligence Service, faced a storm of criticism after saying last month that his agency suspects several municipal politicians in British Columbia and Cabinet ministers in at least two provinces had fallen under the influence of a foreign government.

“I think that Mr. Fadden only gingerly scratched the surface. I feel for him that he was dragged before an investigative committee with Parliament to have to explain, and I think that this situation is far worse than what he let on.”

Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff said the comments of Mr. Anders and Mr. Fadden are clouding the future of Canadian and Chinese relations.

“Casting aspirations and suspicion on any community does no good in Canada, certainly does no good in China,” said Mr. Ignatieff, who addressed an audience in Toronto’s Chinatown last night.

“If you’re running a serious relationship with a serious country you don’t say those kinds of things.” he added. “As my mother used to say, it’s bush league.”

Mr. Anders’ opinions have landed him in political trouble in the past. Last month, he apologized for a comment he wrote on a card to Canadian troops in Afghanistan: “When in doubt, pull the trigger.”

The National Post

Posted in Canada, China, corruption, News, People, politician, Politics, Social, spy, World | Comments Off on Chinese influence on Canada runs deep: MP

China swaying politicians with gifts, sex: Canadian MP

Posted by Author on July 30, 2010


CBC News, Canada, July 30, 2010 –

A Calgary Conservative MP is accusing Chinese authorities of attempting to buy the influence of Canadian politicians and government officials with financial incentives and prostitutes, suggesting some officials may have been compromised.

“I know politicians who have done things that I think are antithetical to their character and I know those politicians to have been offered things — whether they were lucrative business deals or sexual favours while they were over on foreign trips,” Rob Anders told CBC’s Power & Politics.

“Now can I give you the smoking gun to say that I definitely know there’s a link between the two? Probably not. But can I tell you that I think these things go on and I think it’s fairly obvious, yes.”

Anders said MPs have told him how they had women follow them back to their rooms in Shanghai and offer them massages.

“I’ve had members of Parliament tell me about business deals they were offered that frankly were above market rates and that they should have known better, that were, you know, veiled attempts to create or curry favour and influence.”

Anders said he wouldn’t divulge names and that he didn’t want to “engage in a witch hunt” against his colleagues.

Anders said he himself had been offered sexual favours while in China but that he turned them down. He said he didn’t address his concerns with the Prime Minister’s Office, but that officials have been briefed by the department of Foreign Affairs about the issue.

In an exclusive interview with CBC News on June 22, Canadian Security Intelligence Service director Richard Fadden said foreign governments hold influence over at least two cabinet ministers in two provinces, and are also involved with municipal politicians in B.C. and with federal public servants.

Fadden did not provide any names, but implied that China was one of those foreign governments.

But Liberal MP Jim Karygiannis, who has travelled to China numerous times, called the allegations “ludicrous.”

“If Mr. Anders has any evidence, then he should take it and bring it forward to the ethics commissioner and do it now and stop paintbrushing the rest of the parliamentarians with the brush that certainly is not becoming of Canadian parliamentarians.”

“To make statements like that, the man has really reached the bottom of the barrel,” he said.

Public Safety Minister Vic Toews said he wasn’t aware of the specific allegations made by Anders. But he said if those propositions are being made, Anders should bring the details forward to police and security agencies.

Toews added that it’s not surprising that there are allegations that governments attempt to influence politicians.

“That has been a constant theme in newspaper articles for the last half century and probably before that. That’s nothing new. It’s how politicians respond to pressure or influence.”

CBC News

Posted in Asia, China, corruption, News, People, politician, Politics, Social, spy, World | Comments Off on China swaying politicians with gifts, sex: Canadian MP

Are China’s Confucius Institutes in Canada culture clubs or spy outposts?

Posted by Author on July 9, 2010


Adam McDowell, National Post, Canada, Friday, Jul. 9, 2010 –

Before
McMaster University art history professor Angela Sheng leads a journalist on a tour of the year-old school of Chinese language and culture within the Hamilton, Ont., university, she invites him to sit for a cup of Kuan Yin tea, a Fujian Province specialty. After the tour, she suggests, they should catch lunch at one of her favourite local Chinese restaurants; in the meantime, would he like a Chinese calendar, or a VIP pass to the Institute’s spring gala? Between her chummy demeanour and the shock of fuschia through her hair, the director of the Confucius Institute at McMaster is more outgoing (and probably hipper) than the visiting-from-China faculty who work for her, but all are unfailingly polite and gracious.

Officially, Confucius Institutes are the Chinese equivalent of the Alliance Française or Goethe-Institut — the flourishing power’s catch-up response to European countries’ subsidized overseas language schools. At McMaster, students take courses in Chinese language and culture for credit; the Institute also organizes cultural events.

Last month, Brock University, based in St. Catharines, Ont., announced that this fall it will establish the third Confucius Institute in Ontario and the seventh in Canada, all established in the last five years. To China observers and counter-intelligence agents, the runaway expansion of Confucius Institutes represents a threat, both as an arm of Chinese “soft power” abroad and as a potential vehicle for intelligence gathering.

“I think there’s a concern from an intelligence point of view, definitely,” says Michel Juneau-Katsuya, a retired CSIS agent who served as Asia bureau chief during the 1990s and published a book last fall about foreign espionage in Canada.

Mr. Juneau-Katsuya, who last year co-authored Nest of Spies with Fabrice de Pierrebourg (which discusses the Confucius Institute), says he suspects the schools may have been in the mind of CSIS head Richard Fadden when he warned television viewers last month of the need to be wary of foreign agents cozying up to Canadians with an interest in China.

“These Confucius organizations have not come out of philanthropic ideals,’’ Mr. Juneau-Katsuya said in an interview. ‘‘They are part of a strategy. And they are funded and run by organizations that are linked to Chinese intelligence services.”

Confucius Institutes have spread spectacularly, with hundreds sprouting around the world since the program began in 2004. In an interview with the state-run newspaper People’s Daily in March 2009, worldwide Confucius Institute chief Xu Lin said he expects the 500th centre to open this year. Even the governing Office of Chinese Language Council International, also known as Hanban, seems taken aback by its own success.

The typical arrangement works like this: Hanban provides the funding, primarily in the form of sending Chinese nationals qualified as language teachers. Demand for Mandarin instruction at all education levels far exceeds what Canadian schools and universities can provide, making the instructors the keystone of the equation.

The Chinese government agency may also furnish the program with textbooks and online versions of courses for distance learning. Some Confucius Institutes organize educational trips to China. For its part, the host institution provides facilities, Canadian students eager to learn Mandarin, and the institute director — Ms. Sheng, for example, remains a McMaster professor. Ordinarily, the host institution is a college or university, but there are exceptions: In Edmonton, the program has partnered with the public school board to offer Mandarin lessons for elementary and high school students.

Unlike some other Confucius Institutes, the program at McMaster is integrated with the host university such that students receive credit for courses taken.

“The Confucius Institute at McMaster is like other Confucius Institutes worldwide. The number one objective is to provide instruction in Chinese language as a second or foreign language. And, concurrent with this program, to help students understand and better absorb the language, [we] provide cultural activities,” Ms. Sheng says. (She shares the Chinese government’s habit of referring to Mandarin, China’s majority dialect as “Chinese.”)

Ms. Sheng is grateful to senior administrators at McMaster for plugging the Confucius courses into the degree-granting system. “For the CI at Mac to be here, at an academic university, offering for-credit courses, is an enviable position,” she says.

Although the specifics of arrangements between China and host institutions are often not revealed, Brock disclosed that Hanban will provide US$150,000 in startup cash and up to US$100,000 in annual project funds to support the Institute there. It will focus on allowing teachers to certify as Mandarin instructors in Ontario schools, thus establishing a qualification program where none existed previously. Like many such documents, the Brock University press release portrays the arrangement as a prestigious coup for the Canadian institution.

Greg Finn, a Brock vice-provost and associate vice-president who was involved in bringing the Institute and the university together, recalls the suggestion coming both from a faculty member and the head of a visiting delegation from Brock’s Chinese partner, Minjiang University.

“They both happened fairly close to each other, actually, in terms of the suggestions coming forward both from the Chinese government official and the faculty member here at the university — independently of each other,” he says.

David Matas, a Winnipeg-based human rights lawyer who was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize this year for his work investigating abuses in China, cautions that universities may get more than they bargain for after partnering with Hanban, suggesting Chinese consular officials lean on the universities to silence speakers whom that government considers nuisances.

“The Confucius Institutes are a problem of course because of money. The money becomes a dependency and the dependency is used for leverage in trying to get what [China] wants,” he says.

Mr. Matas says that when he and co-author David Kilgour travel for speaking engagements, “more or less wherever we go, the Chinese government tries to shut us up in various ways.”

He suspects universities with Confucius Institutes are especially susceptible to pressure. “In some places where we’ve gone, we’ve had last-minute cancellations at universities where they have Confucius Institutes … with no plausible explanation,” he says.

Last year, an Israeli judge found that a Tel Aviv University administrator had cancelled a show of artwork by Falun Gong members after the Chinese embassy asked him. The ruling said the administrator feared losing Confucius Institute classes, travel scholarships and conferences.

China has another stick to shake at Canadian universities, namely the threat of delisting them as recommended institutions for Chinese students heading abroad. In February, a few months after the University of Calgary awarded the Dalai Lama an honorary degree, the Chinese Ministry of Education started warning Chinese degree-seekers they could “face risks” if they decided to study there.

It is not known how many universities and educational bodies have been approached by Hanban and declined the opportunity to host a Confucius Institute. The University of British Columbia turned down an offer. Somewhat conspicuously, there is no Institute in Toronto, which has more residents of Chinese background than any other Canadian city…….(more details from National Post)

Posted in Canada, China, News, People, Politics, Social, spy, World | 1 Comment »

Article Review: China Spies in Canada– steal industrial secrets, engage in propaganda war

Posted by Author on July 6, 2010


(The following article was published in 2007 regarding China Spies in Canada)

John Turley-Ewart, via The National Post, Canada, May 02, 2007 –

The extent of China’s spy network in Canada has attracted some attention recently following the director of CSIS, Canada’s spy agency, admitting that China is “pretty much” at the top of the list of countries with foreign spies operating here.

Indeed, Jim Judd, CSIS’s chief suggested that about 50% of CSIS’s time is spent tracking China’s operatives in our country. Much of that spying may well be aimed at stealing industrial secrets that, if successfully executed, undermines economic growth in Canada and costs our country both jobs and huge amounts of money. Such espionage deserves serious attention and is not what one expects from a friendly government.

Yet the threat from Chinese operatives in Canada goes beyond theft and has involved the spread of hate as well. Specifically, the Chinese are engaged in a pogrom-like action against Falun Gong practitioners in China and have promoted fear and hatred of Falun Gong here in Canada among the Chinese community.

The result can be seen when law-abiding Canadians who stroll into Chinese malls in Canada wearing Falun Gong T-Shirts are told to leave because of the shirts.

Freedom of speech is a right in Canada, but China’s officials  would prefer it was otherwise. Indeed they encourage Chinese-Canadians to shun and silence fellow Canadians who practice Falun Gong.

I wrote about this a few years ago.

Beijing’s mandarins declared Falun Gong a “cult” in the 1990s and outlawed it in 1999. Since then China’s government has been  arresting and imprisoning Falun Gong practitioners and are accused of violating their human rights.

I recall some years ago the Chinese ambassador to Canada coming to the Post and distributing his government’s anti-Falun Gong material to our editorial board with a gusto that was alarming.

Readers should keep in mind the Chinese spies are not just trying to undermine economic growth in Canada by stealing our industrial secrets, they are also engaged in a propaganda war against Canadians who practice Falun Gong, a war aimed at generating hate for those practitioners and ultimately diminishing their rights as Canadian citizens.

The National Post, 2007

Related:
We need to get real about spies– China’s interference in Canada
The Seduction of China’s Red Carpet
Canadian Spy Master Criticized by Alleged China Front Organization

Posted in Canada, China, News, People, Politics, Social, spy, World | 2 Comments »

We need to get real about spies– China’s interference in Canada

Posted by Author on June 27, 2010


By L.N. (Len) Giles, Vancouver Sun, Canada, June 26, 2010 –

The director of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, Richard Fadden, should be given top marks for calling a spade a spade, albeit in a gentle and diplomatic manner. He was painting a realistic picture for a naive audience that has little or no understanding of the world of political and economic espionage or foreign interference.

It is interesting to note that those who cry foul the loudest are usually those in business or public office who see themselves in the limelight and on the “cutting edge” of international relations and understanding. At least that is how they like themselves to be seen, and they are mortified when someone suggests that their activities may not be in Canada’s best interests. There are cases in which those kinds of relationships, when closely examined, are shown to be instances of Canadians being manipulated and groomed by foreigners to support long-term political or economic initiatives, which in the end “give away the farm.”

A number of local politicians in Metro Vancouver accepted an all-expense paid junket to China in the spring of 2007 without, it seems, giving any consideration to the appropriateness of their actions. This is a classic example of the kind of influence Fadden was talking about.

CSIS is an agency of the Government of Canada with a mandate to protect the interests of all Canadians. It is not a sinister organization aiming to harass Canadians in their legitimate day-to-day activities. People do unwittingly or willingly come under the influence of a foreign power. It is a fact of life and Canadians need to be attuned to that reality.

Surrey

Giles spent 27 years in the RCMP and CSIS.

Vancouver Sun

Posted in Canada, China, News, Official, People, politician, Politics, Social, spy, Trade, World | Comments Off on We need to get real about spies– China’s interference in Canada

Video: Red Shadow over the Free World – Part 1

Posted by Author on June 24, 2010


by NTD TV –

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Chi Mak’s espionage case attracted quite a bit of media coverage. But his is not the only case. In the past few years, the FBI has arrested approximately 30 Chinese-born Americans who have been involved in stealing information about secret U.S. technology. Fox News Channel reported that there are more than 400 similar cases currently being investigated by the FBI. Spies are not just the technologically savvy—they include illegal immigrants, students studying abroad and employees of western governments. These are the most likely to be approached by Chinese authorities to act as ad hoc spies.

In this episode of Zooming In, we will take a look at some of the ways Chinese authorities manipulate Chinese people living abroad to serve its totalitarian regime.

– Source: NTD TV

Posted in China, Communist Party, News, Overseas Chinese, People, Politics, Social, spy, Video, World | Comments Off on Video: Red Shadow over the Free World – Part 1

Chinese man convicted of smuggling to China sensitive U.S. military communications gear

Posted by Author on May 13, 2010


(Reuters) – A U.S. jury convicted a Chinese national of trying to illegally smuggle to China sensitive communications gear used by the U.S. military and intelligence agencies, the Justice Department said on Wednesday.

Chi Tong Kuok, from Macau, China, was convicted on four counts related to attempting to have the equipment sent to Macau and Hong Kong. The equipment included an encryption device for Internet communications for the U.S. military made under contract by the National Security Agency, prosecutors said.

Additionally, he tried to buy a GPS device used by the U.S. and NATO militaries and a device used by American and NATO forces to load encryption software into their communications devices, they said.

U.S. law bans the export of such devices without permission from the State Department.

A San Diego jury convicted Kuok on all four counts late on Tuesday, including conspiracy to violate U.S. export laws, smuggling, and money laundering. He could face up to 45 years in prison. Sentencing has been scheduled for August 23.

After receiving a tip from a British company in 2006, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents spent three years undercover in a bid to catch Kuok, who used several aliases and e-mail addresses to try to buy the equipment……. (more details from The Reuters)

Posted in Law, military, News, People, Politics, spy, Technology, USA, World | Comments Off on Chinese man convicted of smuggling to China sensitive U.S. military communications gear

Documentary (video): Ways the Chinese Authorities used to Manipulate Overseas Chinese People to Serve Its Totalitarian Regime – (2)

Posted by Author on April 12, 2010


Originally “Red Shadow over the Free World – Part 2”, by NTD TV –

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Over the past 10 years, the Chinese Communist Party, or CCP, has sent out numerous variety performance troupes to western countries. Their performance programs may differ, but they all have two common features – that is, directly or indirectly they all praise the CCP, and they are financed by the taxpayers’ money, regardless if they make profit or not. Recently, even the Cultural Revolution was dramatized, becoming a cultural classic on stage, and boldly performed in theatres in the United States. Without doubt, the costly propaganda did have brainwashing effects on the overseas Chinese. To keep up its daily propaganda, the CCP penetrates into overseas Chinese media in several ways – by providing financial support to them, directly getting people involved in their organizations with news articles, or after re-packaging, forwarding those programs to be shown on western TV networks.

In this episode of Zooming In, we will continue to explore how the Chinese authorities manipulate Chinese people to serve its totalitarian regime.

– Source: NTD TV

Related:
Documentary (video): Ways the Chinese Authorities used to Manipulate Overseas Chinese People to Serve Its Totalitarian Regime – (1)

Posted in China, Commentary, Communist Party, Law, News, Overseas Chinese, People, Politics, Social, spy, USA, Video, World | Comments Off on Documentary (video): Ways the Chinese Authorities used to Manipulate Overseas Chinese People to Serve Its Totalitarian Regime – (2)

Documentary (video): Ways the Chinese Authorities used to Manipulate Overseas Chinese People to Serve Its Totalitarian Regime – (1)

Posted by Author on April 11, 2010


Originally “Red Shadow over the Free World – Part 1”, by NTD TV –

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Chi Mak’s espionage case attracted quite a bit of media coverage. But his is not the only case. In the past few years, the FBI has arrested approximately 30 Chinese-born Americans who have been involved in stealing information about secret U.S. technology. Fox News Channel reported that there are more than 400 similar cases currently being investigated by the FBI. Spies are not just the technologically savvy—they include illegal immigrants, students studying abroad and employees of western governments. These are the most likely to be approached by Chinese authorities to act as ad hoc spies.

In this episode of Zooming In, we will take a look at some of the ways Chinese authorities manipulate Chinese people living abroad to serve its totalitarian regime.

– Source: NTD TV

Posted in China, Commentary, Communist Party, Law, News, Overseas Chinese, People, Politics, Social, spy, USA, Video, World | Comments Off on Documentary (video): Ways the Chinese Authorities used to Manipulate Overseas Chinese People to Serve Its Totalitarian Regime – (1)