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    1. A China More Just, Gao Zhisheng
    2.Officially Sanctioned Crime in China, He Qinglian
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    Will the Boat Sink the Water? Chen Guidi, Wu Chuntao
    4.
    Losing the New China, Ethan Gutmann
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    Nine Commentaries on The Communist Party, the Epochtimes
  • Did you know

    Reporters Without Borders said in it’s 2005 special report titled “Xinhua: the world’s biggest propaganda agency”, that “Xinhua remains the voice of the sole party”, “particularly during the SARS epidemic, Xinhua has for last few months been putting out news reports embarrassing to the government, but they are designed to fool the international community, since they are not published in Chinese.”
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U.S. Chinese Democracy Leader Liu Gang Says Wife a Communist Party Spy

Posted by Author on May 29, 2011

(Epochtimes)– A former leader of the 1989 Tiananmen student movement has accused his wife of being a spy for the Chinese Communist Party in a series of Twitter posts and online blog entries over the weekend. His wife denies the accusation.

Liu Gang lives in exile in the United States and is a member of the overseas Chinese democracy movement. He met his wife four years ago online, and in their first face-to-face meeting she proposed marriage.

Since she was young, pretty, a graduate from a top business school in the United States, and a manager in a major firm, he agreed—he later said he thought her sudden proposal to him was “the American way.” Her name is Guo Yinghua, but in his Twitter messages Liu now calls her “Officer Guo.”
Liu says her mission was to spy on the overseas Chinese democracy movement, and that he’s exposing the case to warn the world of the “treacherous methods” of the regime in mainland China. He has reported her to the FBI. He says he’s got a mountain of evidence to back it up.

Guo, the wife, says she is going to sue for defamation. The couple have a two-year-old daughter together and are currently in divorce proceedings.

Evidence claimed by Liu to show Guo’s background in espionage includes a graduation certificate from a military academy in China, a series of odd bank account transactions, and a long list of anecdotes that sound like they were taken from the film “The Long Kiss Goodnight.”

He says that Guo has already admitted in court that she graduated from a military academy in China, was secretly trained as a spy for several years, worked in the Chinese military with a rank of Captain, and lied on her green card application form. The Epoch Times was unable to contact either Liu or Guo, or verify Guo’s alleged admissions in court.

Liu came to the U.S. with consular assistance in 1996, took a Masters in computer science at Columbia, and began working for Bell Labs, Citibank, and other American firms.

In an essay online, widely copied around dissident websites, Liu lists his active role in organizing protests against the Chinese regime over the years. In 2005, for example, he helped found a “Funeral Committee” for the ousted communist leader Zhao Ziyang, who had sympathized with the students soon before they were massacred.

He says that because of these activities, the CCP “hated me to the marrow of my bones.” Military intelligence officials then hatched a plot using concepts of “unrestricted warfare,” a popular school of thought among Communist Party strategists that calls for crushing an opponent using whatever means necessary, Liu says.

He says that’s why “Officer Guo” approached him online in 2007, and wasted no time in getting close.

Liu also says that Guo began restricting his finances and forbade him from joining anti-CCP activities. She also had no compunction on spending big—his money—on cars, diamonds and other luxury items. She transferred money from his personal account to other accounts, he said.

In his essay online Liu says that while Guo insisted she graduated from the University of Shanghai, at a gathering once they bumped into an acquaintance who greeted her as a military official. Guo then hurriedly pulled the person aside and stopped them from continuing, Liu alleges. But he later found out her background from Guo’s mother, Liu says.

A series of other anecdotes over the few years of their marriage allege that Guo is a top marksman, has a deep knowledge of military affairs, is expert in defensive driving, maintains secret bank accounts, and knows her way around the electronic circuitry of a car (she once expertly ripped out the circuit board, repositioned some switches, then inserted it back under the steering wheel, he says).

On top of that, Liu alleges that several of the maids of honor invited by Guo to their wedding were actually known CCP agents; he says several of them have since gone back to China.

Guo also moved large amounts of money from his bank account, he wrote. “She told me that she owed many student loans. Whenever there was a balance in my account, she would transfer it to her account,” he said. He alleges that she was receiving US$60,000 a year from the Chinese military, that she actually maintained 13 bank accounts, and that from one of them—of which Liu says he managed to obtain documents—there was a US$280,000 outbound transfer in one year.

Liu Gang says that he is exposing “officer Guo” not out of a personal vendetta, but because he wants the United States to understand the Chinese Communist Party’s modus operandi.

In his blog post he wrote: “They must not be allowed to be so arrogant in the free world.”

The Epochtimes

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