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    1. A China More Just, Gao Zhisheng
    2.Officially Sanctioned Crime in China, He Qinglian
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    Will the Boat Sink the Water? Chen Guidi, Wu Chuntao
    4.
    Losing the New China, Ethan Gutmann
    5.
    Nine Commentaries on The Communist Party, the Epochtimes
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    Reporters Without Borders said in it’s 2005 special report titled “Xinhua: the world’s biggest propaganda agency”, that “Xinhua remains the voice of the sole party”, “particularly during the SARS epidemic, Xinhua has for last few months been putting out news reports embarrassing to the government, but they are designed to fool the international community, since they are not published in Chinese.”
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Archive for the ‘search engine’ Category

China Wants To Block “Human Flesh Search Engine”

Posted by Author on May 25, 2013


On May 21st the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) internal magazine “Hong Qi Wen Gao” published an article which stated that “Constitutionalism is a characteristic of Capitalism, not Socialism”. This opinion triggered a public outcry in China, and has become a sitting duck for critics. Someone noticed that another article in the same volume reacted against the “human flesh search engine”, stating that “Human flesh search engine is a type of tyranny by the majority and is an invasion of privacy”. However, some argued that as Chinese civilians are not protected by Constitutionalism, “human flesh search engine” turns out to be their only weapon to supervise the CCP so it should not be taken away. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in censorship, China, Human Rights, Internet, Politics, search engine, Social, Technology, World | Comments Off on China Wants To Block “Human Flesh Search Engine”

New Yorkers Sue China and Its Biggest Search Engine Firm Baidu Over Internet Censorship

Posted by Author on May 20, 2011


Eight New York residents are suing China and its biggest search engine company, accusing Baidu of conspiring with the government to censor pro-democracy content.

The lawsuit claims violations of the US constitution, and according to the plaintiffs’ lawyer, is the first of its type. In an unorthodox move, it names not only a company but also the Chinese government as defendants.

The lawsuit was filed on Wednesday, more than a year after Google declared it would no longer censor search results in China, and rerouted internet users to its Hong Kong website. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in censorship, China, Internet, Law, News, search engine, Technology, USA, World | Comments Off on New Yorkers Sue China and Its Biggest Search Engine Firm Baidu Over Internet Censorship

China plans to create a government-controlled online search engine– would compete with Baidu.com

Posted by Author on August 14, 2010


By DAVID BARBOZA, The New York Times, August 13, 2010 –

SHANGHAI — In an apparent bid to extend its control over the Internet and cash in on the rapid growth of mobile devices, China plans to create a government-controlled search engine.

The new venture would compete with Baidu.com, a private company that runs China’s dominant search engine. Baidu’s market has grown since Google retreated from the mainland earlier this year.

The state-owned China Mobile — the world’s biggest cellphone carrier — and Xinhua, China’s official state-run news agency, signed an agreement on Thursday to create a joint venture called the Search Engine New Media International Communications Company.

China already has the world’s largest number of Internet users, more than 420 million, and also the largest number of mobile phone subscribers, with more than 800 million.

Private start-up companies play a big role on the Web in China, but the government maintains tight control over Internet companies and censors content that it deems dangerous or sensitive.

Now, though, analysts say that Beijing is pushing state-run companies to take a more active role online. China Central Television, the nation’s dominant broadcaster, is trying to develop an online video site. Xinhua News Agency is trying to build a global platform of news providers using television and the Internet.

At the announcement of the joint venture in Beijing on Thursday, Zhou Xisheng, vice president of Xinhua, said the new company would build a leading search engine platform. But he also said the move was “part of the country’s broader efforts to safeguard its information security and push forward the robust, healthy and orderly development of China’s new media industry.”

Representatives of Baidu could not be reached for comment. …...(more details from New York Times)

Posted in China, Internet, News, Politics, search engine, Social, Technology, World | Comments Off on China plans to create a government-controlled online search engine– would compete with Baidu.com

Google drops Chinese name “Gu Ge” (photos)

Posted by Author on April 3, 2010


Google has taken another action today to express its willingness of keeping  distance with the Chinese censors: drops the Chinese name “Gu Ge” from the search engine logo and uses Google “Hong Kong” instead on its forwarded http://www.google.com.hk website.

Google started using the Chinese name “Gu Ge” on its Chinese website Google.cn from 2006 since it entered the China market, and has forwarded it to its Hong Kong website http://www.google.com.hk since last week, when it decided not to cooperate with the Chinese censor.

Here’s a screenshot of the website logo which you will see if you type into your browser the Google’s domain name in China, google.cn:

Google dropped Chinese name "Gu Ge" from its Hong Kong website logo and uses Google "hong Kong" instead.

Also the following photo shows the old “Gu Ge” logo which has been dropped by Google:

Old "Gu Ge" logo that was used by Google in China

Posted in Business, censorship, China, Company, Google, Hong kong, Internet, News, Politics, search engine, Technology, USA, website, World | 2 Comments »

Google, China and Censorship: A Wired.com FAQ

Posted by Author on April 2, 2010


By Ryan Singel, wired.com, apr. 2, 2010-

In 2006, Google started operating a mainland China-based search engine at Google.cn — agreeing to censor search results, so long as it could mention on censored search results pages that it was blocking content at the request of the Communist government. Then in January 2010, Google announced publicly that it was sick of censorship and seeing hacking attempts aimed at government critics and would no longer abide running a censored search engine in China.

So just two business weeks ago, Google abruptly redirected all Google.cn traffic to its uncensored servers in Hong Kong, an arrangement that seems to have reached a sort of stable peace with the Chinese government.

But it’s still sort of a confusing mess …

So did Google shut down its Google.cn search engine?

Technically, yes. As of March 22, all users trying to reach Google.cn are being redirected to Google.com.hk. That url uses different servers — ones not hosted in China’s mainland.

So, the Chinese government won?

Yes, maybe. Google is not operating a search engine in China proper that is not complying with its internet censorship law. Google has been shown to be an interloper meddling in China’s internal affairs, which won’t be tolerated on a .cn domain.

But, wait, Chinese users going to Google.cn are being re-directed to an uncensored Google search engine — also in Chinese — that doesn’t censor and shows ads. So Google won, no?

Yes, maybe, exactly. Google is running an uncensored search engine that is providing mainland Chinese users an unfiltered set of search results. Hong Kong, a part of China since the British turned it over in 1997, retains a large measure of independence and does not censor political dialog online.

So can Chinese users learn all they want about Falun Gong and Melamine-tainted milk and the Tienanmen massacre?

Well, users will now see many more links in their search results than they used to. But that doesn’t mean they can actually open them, since they many are blocked directly by China’s collection of firewalls.

How can I check on what the Chinese government is censoring?

Google now has a page where it lists what services it says are blocked. You can test web search yourself using WebSitePulse’s service. Currently, many formerly blocked searches, such as one for the banned religion Falun Gong, return full search results to Chinese users. However, many of the results, such as Falun Gong’s Wikipedia entry, are blocked by the firewall.

So wait, why did Google go to China in the first place?

First, there’s money. China will eventually have more citizens online than any other country. Secondly, Google thought that by providing a local search engine, even a censored one would lead, eventually, to a reduction in censorship.

So Google gets off scott-free?

Not likely. The company is set to lose some deals where it powers the search for portals and mobile devices in China……. (more details from Wired.com)

Posted in Business, censorship, China, Company, Freedom of Information, Freedom of Speech, Google, Human Rights, Internet, News, Politics, search engine, Technology, World | Comments Off on Google, China and Censorship: A Wired.com FAQ

Baidu Resumes Censorship of Genocide Lawsuits Against Former China President Jiang Zemin

Posted by Author on April 2, 2010


After 10 hours in which Chinese search engines Baidu and Sogou had stopped filtering information related to lawsuits filed against former regime leader Jiang Zemin, the filtering has been resumed.

On March 31, for the first time, information regarding international lawsuits filed by overseas Falun Gong practitioners against Jiang Zemin was accessible to netizens in China by using the search engine Baidu and keywords related to the lawsuits for genocide, such as “Jiang Zemin Genocide Case.”

They were able to read that Jiang stands accused of torture and genocide in 50 lawsuits that have been filed in 17 different countries by Falun Gong practitioners.

Analyst Lu Gaping (Lu Jiaping), a history scholar who has written online commentaries regarding Jiang’s secretive life and misconduct, had remarked that the change suggested Jiang had lost his political influence in China, though the regime is not ready to reveal the fact to the public.

Soon after the Chinese Epoch Times (Dajiyuan) published two articles on the sudden move made by the two search engines, the Chinese Epoch Times showed up in the first page of search results of Baidu.

At around 7 p.m. when The Epoch Times reporter used Baidu and Sogou to search the same keyword, the Chinese Epoch Times’ name continued to appear and even moved up in the list shown in the first page of search results.

However, at around 11 p.m. EST using Baidu and Sogou to search the same keyword, the situation had suddenly changed. An error message read: “Search result probably does not conform with related laws and regulations; Cannot display results.” (The Epochtimes)

Posted in censorship, China, Crime against humanity, Falun Gong, Genocide, Internet, Jiang Zemin, Law, Media, News, Official, Politics, Religion, search engine, Social, Torture, World | Comments Off on Baidu Resumes Censorship of Genocide Lawsuits Against Former China President Jiang Zemin

Second Hi-tech Company Leaves China- GoDaddy

Posted by Author on March 24, 2010


By Ellen Nakashima and Cecilia Kang, Washington Post Staff Writers, Wednesday, March 24, 2010-

GoDaddy.com Inc., the world’s largest domain name registration company, told lawmakers Wednesday that it will cease registering Web sites in China in response to intrusive new government rules that require applicants to provide extensive personal data, including photographs of themselves.

The rules, the company believes, are an effort by China to increase monitoring and surveillance of Web site content and could put individuals who register their sites with the firm at risk. The company also believes the rules will have a “chilling effect” on new domain name registrations.

GoDaddy’s move follows Google’s announcement Monday that it will no longer censor search results on its site in China. Analysts and human rights advocates have warned that China’s insistence on censorship and control over information is becoming a serious barrier to trade.

“GoDaddy is the first company to publicly follow Google’s example in responding to the Chinese government’s censorship of the Internet by partially retreating from the Chinese market,” Rep. Christopher H. Smith (R-N.J.) said in a statement. “Google fired a shot heard ’round the world, and now a second American company has answered the call to defend the rights of the Chinese people.”

Smith has sponsored a bill that would make it a crime for U.S. companies to share personal user information with “Internet-restricting” countries.

In December, China began to enforce a new policy that required any registrant of a new .cn domain name to provide a color head shot and other business identification, including a Chinese business registration number and physical signed registration forms. That data was to be forwarded to the China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC), a quasi-governmental agency. Most domain name registries require only name, address, telephone number and e-mail address.

“We were immediately concerned about the motives behind the increased level of registrant verification being required,” Christine N. Jones, general counsel of the Go Daddy Group Inc., told the Congressional-Executive Commission on China on Wednesday. “The intent of the procedures appeared, to us, to be based on a desire by the Chinese authorities to exercise increased control over the subject matter of domain name registrations by Chinese nationals.”

GoDaddy has been registering domain names since 2000 and has more than 40 million domain names under management. Jones said China was the first government to retroactively seek additional verification and documentation of registrants. …… (more details from The Washington Post)

Posted in Business, censorship, China, Company, Google, Internet, News, Politics, search engine, Social, Technology, Trade, USA, website, World | Comments Off on Second Hi-tech Company Leaves China- GoDaddy

U.S. Congress slams China and Microsoft, praises Google

Posted by Author on March 24, 2010


By David Goldman, CNN, Mar. 24, 2010-

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) — Two days after Google stopped censoring search results in China, a congressional panel praised the company’s actions while excoriating the Beijing government for its record on Internet censorship and human rights.

At a hearing held by the Congressional-Executive Commission on China on Wednesday, lawmakers called on China to allow a free flow of ideas on the Internet and sharply criticized Microsoft for continuing to act complicity with China’s censorship laws.

“China wants to participate in the marketplace of goods but keep the marketplace of ideas outside their country,” said Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., “Only when China respects human rights and allows the free flow of ideas … only then will they be treated as a full member of the international community.”

While lawmakers scolded China, they roundly applauded Google for shutting down its search operations in China.

Rep. Chris Smith, R-N.J., called Google’s decision “a remarkable, historic and welcomed action.” He also praised Internet domain host site GoDaddy.com for leaving China.

At the same time, he lit a fire under Google’s search rival Microsoft (MSFT, Fortune 500) for continuing to censor results in China and not following Google’s (GOOG, Fortune 500) lead.

“They [Microsoft] need to get on the right side of human rights rather than enabling tyranny, which they’re doing right now,” Smith said.

Microsoft could not immediately be reached for a response.

Smith said he supported the Global Online Freedom Act, which would require tech companies doing business in China to disclose what they’re censoring. He called on China to do “more than passing lip service” to Google and pass the act.

Google agreed that the United States needed to take action as well. At the hearing, Google’s director of public policy, Alan Davidson said governments should do more to protect Internet freedom around the world.

“Internet censorship is a growing global problem,” Davidson said. “It not only raises important human rights concerns, but also creates significant barriers for U.S. companies doing business abroad.”

But Google did not completely avoid criticism from lawmakers. When asked specifically what Google was censoring in China, Davidson said he could not reveal that information, because it is a Chinese state secret.

“I admire the decision … but aren’t you able to talk about it outside of China?” asked Dorgan.

Davidson declined, to Dorgan’s displeasure. Davidson said the legality of the issue represented one of the reasons why the company shut down its search service in the company because it puts Google “in a terribly difficult position.”…… (more details from CNN)

Posted in Business, censorship, China, Company, Freedom of Information, Google, Human Rights, Internet, Microsoft, News, Politics, search engine, Social, Technology, Trade, USA, website, World | 1 Comment »

Google’s Brin urges US to make China row ‘high priority’

Posted by Author on March 24, 2010


AFP, Mar. 24, 2010-

LONDON — Google co-founder Sergey Brin said in an interview published Wednesday that Chinese regulations which prevent the Web giant from being competitive in China should be considered a “trade barrier.”

Brin, in comments published by the British newspaper The Guardian, said human rights issues should be given “equal time” with trade concerns and the US administration should make the censorship row with China a “high priority.”

China has attacked Google for stopping censorship of its Chinese-language search engine but said there should be no broader fall-out in Sino-US ties provided the issue is not politicized in the United States.

Google announced Monday it would no longer filter results on China-based Google.cn and was redirecting mainland Chinese users to an uncensored site in Hong Kong — effectively closing down the mainland site.

Brin urged pressure from government and businesses on Beijing over the row.

“I certainly hope they make it a high priority,” he told the newspaper. “Human rights issues deserve equal time to the trade issues that are high priority now — I hope this gets taken seriously.”

He added that issues of trade and censorship were closely linked.

“Since services and information are our most successful exports, if regulations in China effectively prevent us from being competitive, then they are a trade barrier,” Brin said.

Brin’s remarks coincided with a hearing to be hosted in Washington on Wednesday by the US Congressional-Executive Commission on China on “Google and Internet Control in China: A Nexus Between Human Rights and Trade?”

The Google co-founder also accused arch-rival Microsoft of exploiting the row to score points against his California-based firm.

“I’m very disappointed for them in particular,” he said. “As I understand, they have effectively no market share — so they essentially spoke against freedom of speech and human rights simply in order to contradict Google.”

In an interview with The Wall Street Journal published online on Wednesday, Brin discussed some of the reasons for Google’s dramatic move, telling the newspaper China was increasingly reminding him of his native Soviet Union.

The 36-year-old Brin’s parents fled the Soviet Union when he was six years old to escape anti-Semitism and other repression……. (more details from AFP)

Posted in Business, censorship, China, Company, Google, Human Rights, Internet, News, Politics, search engine, Social, Technology, USA, website, World | Comments Off on Google’s Brin urges US to make China row ‘high priority’

After Google moved out China, it’s time for the U.S. to take action

Posted by Author on March 24, 2010


By YANG JIANLI, Via Wall Street Journal, Mar. 24, 2010-

Google’s action is the latest in a series of events that pose the greatest challenge to the Chinese government’s carefully fabricated facade of legitimacy since the 1989 Tiananmen pro-democracy movement. Few people in the West recognize the precarious position of the Chinese rulers. The vast majority of Chinese citizens have nothing but disdain for their government. Sixty years of repression, as well as a modicum of economic opportunity for some, have created an uneasy acquiescence. But that is changing.

Increasingly, Chinese citizens realize that a government, however corrupt, rich and powerful, cannot hold a gun to its people forever. The Internet publication of Charter 08 by leading Chinese intellectuals in December of 2008 was a seismic rupture in the facade of harmony and stability. Although the lead author, Liu Xiaobo, has been sentenced to 11 years in prison, the Charter continues to circulate surreptitiously throughout China, despite attempts by the authorities to eradicate it.

Last November, noted human rights lawyer Feng Zhenghu took a stand against the illegal and pervasive practice of “blacklisting,” by which the Chinese government blocks politically undesirable citizens from returning to their own country from abroad. I myself am a victim of this blacklisting. Mr. Feng held a “sit-in” for over 90 days in the customs area of Tokyo’s Narita Airport in a nonviolent protest. He was sustained by Chinese supporters who traveled to him with supplies and moral support during his vigil.

Alarmed by the growing support network organized via Twitter and Facebook, the Chinese government decided to cut its losses and finally allowed Mr. Feng to return home to Shanghai in February. This action is the first time the Chinese government has allowed a blacklisted person to return to China. It shows the power of the Internet to galvanize citizens around effective nonviolent action against tyranny. And it clearly reveals the vulnerability of the Chinese government and why it is so paranoid regarding an open Internet.

Google’s decision has widened the crack in the Chinese government’s facade of deceit. However, Google alone cannot bring down the Great Firewall. Decisive action by the U.S. government is needed to tear down this Berlin Wall of the 21st century. Specifically, the State Department must act now to facilitate immediate and order of magnitude scale-ups of proven field tested protocols. The money has already been appropriated by Congress. The world-wide dissident community is virtually unanimous in its support for this action.

To quote Confucius, “To see what is right and not to do it is want of courage.” Google has shown us what is right. Now it’s time for the State Department to show courage, not procrastination.

Mr. Yang, a former political prisoner, is a fellow at the Kennedy School of Government and president of Initiatives for China, a pro-democracy think tank.

Wall Street Journal

Posted in censorship, China, Freedom of Information, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, Internet, News, Politics, search engine, Social, Speech, Technology, USA, World | Comments Off on After Google moved out China, it’s time for the U.S. to take action

China struggles over censorship after Google leave

Posted by Author on March 24, 2010


By Kathrin Hille in Beijing, The Financial Times,  March 24 2010 –

Internet users experienced wild swings in access to results on Google’s Chinese search engine on Wednesday, in a sign that Beijing is struggling to decide on the level of censorship for the site after Google moved the service out of the mainland.

At about 10am, users in Beijing were confronted with browser errors for every Chinese term they entered. Searches for “Xinhua News Agency”, “Ministry of Commerce”, “Chinese”, and “Ministry of Health” returned a blank screen. Some 30 minutes later the problem had disappeared.

An employee of Perfect World, the online gaming company, reported that a search for company information on google.com.hk had failed to return any results.

A little later, however, other users found links they could never have dreamt of when Google was still self-censoring its Chinese search results. A search for “Foreign Ministry” in Chinese returned the Foreign Ministry of the People’s Republic of China as the top result, followed by the Foreign Ministry of the Republic of China (Taiwan).

Beijing claims the self-ruled island as part of its territory and normally refuses to recognise that a separate state exists there. All references to Taiwan are purged from the web in China.

Censorship in China is often erratic. This is partly a strategy to make internet users and website administrators wary about what content they post or allow online……. (more details from The Financial Times)

Posted in censorship, China, Freedom of Information, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, Internet, News, Politics, search engine, Technology, website, World | Comments Off on China struggles over censorship after Google leave

China blocks Google searches

Posted by Author on March 24, 2010


news24.com, 2010-03-24 –

Beijing – China’s internet authorities blocked many Google searches for terms and websites deemed politically sensitive on Wednesday, one day after the US internet giant diverted its main Chinese website to an uncensored one in Hong Kong.

Searches in Chinese on the http://www.google.com.hk website were blocked for terms such as the Charter ’08 for democratic reform and for the name of the charter’s main organizer, jailed dissident writer Liu Xiaobo.

Other blocked Chinese search terms included “Dalai”, for the exiled Tibetan Buddhist leader the Dalai Lama, and the banned spiritual movements Zhong Gong and Falun Gong.

Amnesty International’s main website was the top result in an English search for “amnesty”, but China’s “Great Firewall” blocked the link to the website.

An English search returned 22 000 results for pictures of “tank man”, the lone protester who was photographed blocking the approach of a column of tanks into Beijing’s Tiananmen Square during China’s 1989 democracy protests……. (more details from News24.com)

Posted in censorship, China, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, Internet, News, Politics, search engine, Social, Speech, Technology, Tiananmen, World | Comments Off on China blocks Google searches

HRW calls on other companies to follow Google ending all their censorship in China

Posted by Author on March 23, 2010


Human Rights Watch, March 22, 2010 –

(New York)
– Google’s decision to stop censoring its Chinese search engine is a strong step in favor of freedom of expression and information, and an indictment of the Chinese government’s insistence on censorship of the internet, Human Rights Watch said today.  Google announced today that it would not censor searches and instead redirect searches to its uncensored Hong Kong-based site that would provide results in simplified Chinese.  The company also said it would monitor and publicize any attempts at censorship of the site by the Chinese government.

“China is one of the world’s largest economies, but hundreds of millions of Chinese internet users are denied the basic access to information that people around the world take for granted,” said Arvind Ganesan, business and human rights director at Human Rights Watch. “Google’s decision to offer an uncensored search engine is an important step to challenge the Chinese government’s use of censorship to maintain its control over its citizens.”

China’s estimated 338 million internet users remain subject to the arbitrary dictates of state censorship. More than a dozen government agencies are involved in implementing a host of laws, regulations, policy guidelines, and other legal tools to try to keep information and ideas from the Chinese people. Various companies, including Google, Yahoo!, and Microsoft, have enabled this system by blocking terms they believe the Chinese government will want them to censor. Human Rights Watch documented this corporate complicity in internet censorship in China in “Race to the Bottom,” a 149-page report published in August 2006.

On January 12, 2010, Google announced that it was prepared to withdraw from China unless it could operate its Chinese search engine, Google.cn, free of censorship. This decision was made after the company disclosed “highly sophisticated and targeted attacks” on dozens of Gmail users who are advocates of human rights in China. Google said some 20 other companies were also targets of cyber attacks from China. On February 18, 2010, the New York Times reported that these attacks had been traced to Shanghai’s Jiaotong University and the Lanxiang Vocational School. The latter reportedly has close ties to the Chinese military.

In response to the prospect that Google might stop censoring its search engine, on March 12, Li Yizhong, China’s minister of industry and information technology, said, “If you want to do something that disobeys Chinese law and regulations, you are unfriendly, you are irresponsible and you will have to bear the consequences.”

On January 22, 2010, in a major speech on internet freedom, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton called on the Chinese government to investigate those attacks. She also noted that the “private sector has a shared responsibility to help safeguard free expression. And when their business dealings threaten to undermine this freedom, they need to consider what’s right, not simply the prospect of quick profits.”

Human Rights Watch said that companies operating in China or other countries have an obligation to safeguard freedom of expression and privacy online. The Global Network Initiative (GNI), an international effort comprised of companies, including Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo!, human rights organizations such as Human Rights Watch, academics, and socially responsible investors to protect freedom of expression and privacy online, recommends that companies: “challenge the government in domestic courts or seek the assistance of relevant government authorities, international human rights bodies or non-governmental organizations when faced with a government restriction that appears inconsistent with domestic law or procedures or international human rights laws and standards on freedom of expression.”

Human Rights Watch called on other companies to follow Google’s example and end all their censorship of politically sensitive information.

“This is a crucial moment for freedom of expression in China, and the onus is now on other major technology companies to take a firm stand against censorship,” said Ganesan. “But the Chinese government should also realize that its repression only isolates its internet users from the rest of the world – and the long-term harm of isolation far outweighs the short-term benefit of forcing companies to leave.”

Human Rights Watch

Posted in Business, censorship, China, Company, Economy, Freedom of Information, Freedom of Speech, Google, Human Rights, Internet, News, Politics, search engine, Technology, USA, website, World | Comments Off on HRW calls on other companies to follow Google ending all their censorship in China

Google stops censoring in China a bold move that other Internet companies must follow

Posted by Author on March 23, 2010


Reporters Without Borders, Mar. 22, 2010-

US Internet giant
Google announced today that it has stopped censoring its search engine’s Chinese version, Google.cn, and is redirecting its mainland China users to its Hong Kong-based search engine Google.com.hk, where uncensored search results are available in simplified Chinese characters.

“The Chinese authorities have chosen to censor rather than open up their Internet,” Reporters Without Borders said. “We can only deplore the fact that the world’s biggest search engine has been forced to close its Chinese version under pressure from the censors. We pay tribute to Google because, by taking this courageous stance, it is creating a real debate on the issue of censorship in China and is betting on a free Internet accessible to all in the mid or long term.

“Above and beyond the case of China, it is the World Wide Web’s integrity that is at stake. The emergence in recent years of national Intranets controlled by repressive governments has in practice turned many Internet users into victims of a digital divide.

“Google is offering an interesting alternative to its Chinese users by redirecting them to its Hong Kong-based servers. It remains to be seen whether the Chinese authorities will now block its search engine and whether Google will be allowed to maintain its sales presence and research and development work in China. Google.cn’s closure nonetheless clearly sends a bad signal to investors.”

Reporters Without Borders added: “We now appeal to other Internet companies based in China to take the same road and to refuse to censor their own activities. If a common front is established on this issue, the Chinese government will have no choice but to allow access to a freer Internet.”

Google announced on 12 January that it wanted to stop censoring Google.cn after discovering that cyber attacks had been launched from China against the Gmail accounts of several dozen human rights activists. A score of companies in media, technology and other sectors were also reportedly affected by these hacker attacks and by the theft of intellectual property…….(more from Reporters Without Borders)

Posted in censorship, China, Freedom of Information, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, Internet, News, Politics, search engine, Technology, USA, website, World | Comments Off on Google stops censoring in China a bold move that other Internet companies must follow

Google Shuts China Site, because “self-censorship is a non-negotiable legal requirement” by China

Posted by Author on March 22, 2010


Radio Free Asia,  2010-03-22 –

HONG KONG— Google is redirecting China-based traffic to its uncensored Hong Kong Web site, according to a message posted on the company’s official blog, two months the Internet giant threatened to leave the country because of censorship and Chinese hacker attacks.

Google had been negotiating with Beijing about the right to continue hosting a search service in China without filtering results according to Chinese law.

“Earlier today we stopped censoring our search services” for China’s 400 million Internet users, the company blog said.

“Users visiting Google.cn are now being redirected to Google.com.hk, where we are offering uncensored search in simplified Chinese, specifically designed for users in mainland China and delivered via our servers in Hong Kong,” chief legal officer David Drummond wrote.

China requires Internet service providers to censor words and images that the ruling Communist Party says are illegal or unacceptable.

Google said it plans to maintain its engineering and sales offices in China to keep a technological foothold there and continue to sell ads for the Chinese-language version of its search engine in the United States.

The Google blog entry said the Chinese government had been “crystal clear throughout our discussions that self-censorship is a non-negotiable legal requirement” for continuing its business in China.

“We very much hope that the Chinese government respects our decision, though we are well aware that it could at any time block access to our services,” Drummond wrote, adding that the company would continue monitoring accessibility in China and posting the results daily.

The decision comes after more than two months of negotiations after Google announced that it, along with more than 20 other companies, had been the victim of cyberattacks originating from China.

Google said its ensuing investigation into the attacks uncovered evidence that the Gmail accounts of “dozens” of human rights activists connected with China were being accessed by third parties through phishing scams and malware installed on their computers.

It said the attacks and surveillance that the investigation uncovered—combined with government efforts to further limit free speech on the Internet through the blocking of Web sites such as Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube—led the company to conclude that “we could no longer continue censoring our results on Google.cn.”…… (more details from Radio Free Asia)

Related:
Google stops censoring in China- redirects traffic to uncensored Hong Kong Web site

Posted in censorship, China, Freedom of Information, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, Internet, News, Politics, search engine, Social, Technology, USA, website, World | 1 Comment »

Google stops censoring in China- redirects traffic to uncensored Hong Kong Web site

Posted by Author on March 22, 2010


By Juan Carlos Perez, Computer World, March 22, 2010-

IDG News Service – Google has stopped censoring results in China, acting on a decision it made in January.

On Monday, Google stopped censoring Google Search, Google News and Google Images on Google.cn, according to a blog post from Chief Legal Officer David Drummond.

“Users visiting Google.cn are now being redirected to Google.com.hk, where we are offering uncensored search in simplified Chinese, specifically designed for users in mainland China and delivered via our servers in Hong Kong,” he wrote.

As expected, the Chinese government didn’t entertain allowing Google to continue operating an uncensored Google.cn. The Hong Kong work-around is “entirely legal,” he said.

“We very much hope that the Chinese government respects our decision, though we are well aware that it could at any time block access to our services,” Drummond wrote.

Google has set up a Web page where people can monitor the status of its services in China……. (more details from The Computer World)

Posted in Business, censorship, China, Company, Freedom of Information, Freedom of Speech, Google, Human Rights, Internet, News, Politics, search engine, Social, Technology, USA, website, World | 1 Comment »

Chinese Scientists Say Losing Google Would Hurt Research

Posted by Author on February 24, 2010


wired.com, February 24, 2010 –

Google and China may not be fighting over science, but their feud could have unintended negative consequences for researchers in the country.

A Nature News survey of Chinese scientists found that 84 percent of them thought losing access to Google would “somewhat or significantly” hurt their work process. Like their American counterparts, Chinese researchers use Google and Google Scholar to find papers and related information.

“Research without Google would be like life without electricity,” one Chinese scientist told Nature.

In January, Google announced it would stop following censorship rules required by the Chinese government after its servers came under attack. It remains to be seen whether the Mountain View company will be thrown out of the country for that stance.

When Google’s initial announcement broke, media blogger Robin Sloan of Snarkmarket pondered the possibility of the splitting of the famously world-circling internet.

“Is the Chinese internet going to be largely parallel? The othernet?” Sloan asked.

If events do continue in that direction, truly global enterprises like science could suffer as information becomes harder — even if only moderately — to exchange. (- wired.com)

Posted in China, Company, Google, Internet, News, Politics, search engine, Social, Technology, World | Comments Off on Chinese Scientists Say Losing Google Would Hurt Research

Google rebels against China’s Internet censors: Reporters Without Borders

Posted by Author on January 13, 2010


Reporters Without Borders hails US Internet giant Google’s announcement yesterday that it will stop censoring the Chinese version of its search engine, Google.cn – a move that could lead to Google.cn’s closure and Google’s withdrawal from the Chinese market. The company said it took the decision following sophisticated cyber-attacks on Gmail accounts coming from China.

“We can only welcome the courage shown by Google’s executives,” Reporters Without Borders said. “A foreign IT company has finally accepted its responsibilities towards Chinese users and is standing up to the Chinese authorities, who keep clamping down more and more on the Internet.

“In the face of repeated and increasingly sophisticated cyber-attacks and humiliating treatment by the Chinese authorities, who accuse them of not doing enough to block sensitive information, Google has decided to take a tougher line and is setting its own conditions for continuing to operate in China.

“We call on other IT companies to form a common front and we urge the Chinese authorities to reconsider their position. Google seems to have opened a breach – the cooperation of western companies in the control of news and information is no longer systematic.”

Reporters Without Borders also welcomed the transparency displayed by Google. “By making these cyber-attacks public, Google is clearly showing that its priority is to protect the personal data of its clients, including the most vulnerable ones. It is refusing to be an accomplice of the Chinese authorities in their pursuit of dissidents online.”

Google’s U-turn follows attacks launched from China on the Gmail accounts of several dozen human rights activists. Reporters Without Borders has itself been the target of cyber-attacks from China. A score of companies in the media, technology, finance and chemical sectors were also reportedly affected by these hacker attacks and by the theft of intellectual property……. (more details from Reporters Without Borders)

Posted in Business, censorship, China, Company, Freedom of Information, Google, Human Rights, Internet, Investment, News, Politics, search engine, Technology, World | Comments Off on Google rebels against China’s Internet censors: Reporters Without Borders

Google Ends Censorship In China

Posted by Author on January 12, 2010


Targeted cyber attacks from China on corporate data of at least 20 public companies and efforts to steal data about human rights advocates have prompted Google to re-evaluate its cooperation with Chinese censors.

By Thomas Claburn, The Information Week, January 12, 2010 –

Google said on Tuesday that it will no longer censor search results on Google.cn, a decision likely to end the company’s presence in China.

Google’s decision comes after it detected a highly sophisticated cyber attack on its corporate infrastructure last month that resulted in the theft of Google’s intellectual property. Details about the theft were not disclosed.

David Drummond, SVP of corporate development at Google and the company’s chief legal officer, said in a blog post that Google’s internal investigation revealed at least twenty other large companies had also been attacked.

“[W]e have evidence to suggest that a primary goal of the attackers was accessing the Gmail accounts of Chinese human rights activists,” said Drummond. “Based on our investigation to date we believe their attack did not achieve that objective. Only two Gmail accounts appear to have been accessed, and that activity was limited to account information (such as the date the account was created) and subject line, rather than the content of e-mails themselves.”

As a result of its investigation, Drummond said, Google also discovered that “the accounts of dozens of U.S.-, China- and Europe-based Gmail users who are advocates of human rights in China appear to have been routinely accessed by third parties.” He emphasized that this was not due to a security failure on Google’s part. Rather, these users appear to have had their passwords compromised through phishing scams or malware on their computers.

As a consequence of these attacks, Google has come to believe that it can no longer continue censoring Google.cn, as directed by the Chinese government.

“These attacks and the surveillance they have uncovered–combined with the attempts over the past year to further limit free speech on the Web–have led us to conclude that we should review the feasibility of our business operations in China,” Drummond said. “We have decided we are no longer willing to continue censoring our results on Google.cn, and so over the next few weeks we will be discussing with the Chinese government the basis on which we could operate an unfiltered search engine within the law, if at all. We recognize that this may well mean having to shut down Google.cn, and potentially our offices in China.”

Financially, Google’s revenue from China is not material to its overall revenue.

Google’s decision was immediately hailed by rights groups, many of which have questioned whether the company’s decision in 2006 to cooperate with Chinese censors violated its “Don’t be evil” motto.

“Google has taken a bold and difficult step for Internet freedom in support of fundamental human rights,” said Leslie Harris, president of the Center for Democracy & Technology, in an e-mailed statement. “No company should be forced to operate under government threat to its core values or to the rights and safety of its users. We support Google for being willing to engage in this very difficult process.”

Google’s decision recalls the stand it took against the U.S. government, which sought the company’s search data in 2005 and 2006 to support its ultimately failed effort to uphold the Child Online Protection Act.

“This is a very big step that Google is taking, that is to make public these kinds of cyber attacks,” said Sharon Hom, executive director of Human Rights In China. Such attacks, she said, are not news to the the human rights communities and NGOs, which have long been targeted with phishing, malware, and denial of service attacks. “For Google to make public what they have discovered is highly significant,” she added. “It’s a wake up call to the international business community about the real risks of operating in China.”

Hom said that how China reacts to Google’s decision will send a very strong message to the business community about their future prospects in China.

Dave Girouard, president of Google’s Enterprise group, in a separate blog post stressed that these attacks should not shake faith in cloud computing.

“At Google, we invest massive amounts of time and money in security,” he said. “Nothing is more important to us. Our response to this attack shows that we are dedicated to protecting the businesses and users who have entrusted us with their sensitive email and document information. We are telling you this because we are committed to transparency, accountability, and maintaining your trust.”

informationweek.com

Posted in Business, censorship, China, Company, Freedom of Information, Freedom of Speech, Google, Human Rights, Internet, News, Politics, search engine, Technology, website, World | Comments Off on Google Ends Censorship In China

Google’s CEO talks about China’s Internet Censorship: it’s illegal to describe it

Posted by Author on August 31, 2008


Google’s CEO, Eric Schmidt, comments on China’s Internet Censorship at “The Big Tent” event in Denver, as:

Schmidt noted that the Chinese have a “Great Firewall” for censoring internet work and is so secretive that it’s illegal to describe it. “A rough summary is that if you don’t say Falun Gong,” it’s okay. The question, said Schmidt, is whether the Chinese are better off with Google than without.

read details from portfolio.com: Google’s Schmidt: “They Have Guns and We Don’t”, Aug 28 2008

Posted in censorship, China, Company, Falun Gong, Freedom of Speech, Google, Human Rights, Internet, Law, News, People, Politics, search engine, Social, Technology, website, World | Comments Off on Google’s CEO talks about China’s Internet Censorship: it’s illegal to describe it

(photos) Carrefour Completely Blocked by China Internet Search Engines

Posted by Author on April 30, 2008


Pictures from The Epochtimes, Apr. 30-

The Chinese name of Carrefour, “家乐福” is completely blocked by Chinese Internet search engines, including Google, Yahoo and Microsoft’s Chinese version search engine.

Here’s the captured screens of search results by using key word “家乐福”:

Carrefour Blocked by China Internet Search Engins(1)

Above: Carrefour Blocked by China’s NO. 1  Internet Search Engins(1), Baidu.

Carrefour Blocked by China Internet Search Engins(2)

Above: Carrefour Blocked by Google, Yahoo and other Chinese search engines.

Carrefour Blocked by China Internet Search Engins(3)

Carrefour Blocked by China Internet Search Engins(4)

Above: Carrefour Blocked by Microsoft.

Posted in censorship, China, Company, Google, Human Rights, Internet, Microsoft, News, Photo, Politics, search engine, Speech, website, World, Yahoo | 1 Comment »

Rights Organizations’ Report Censored by China Hours After Issued, Leaked Directive Shows

Posted by Author on February 5, 2008


Reporters Without Borders, 1 February 2008-

Reporters Without Borders and Chinese Human Rights Defenders have obtained a copy of a directive issued by the authorities responsible for Internet censorship in an attempt to prevent online circulation of the report “Journey to the Heart of Internet censorship (http://www.rsf.org/article.php3?id_article=23924),” which the two organisations issued on 10 October 2007.

“We condemn the censorship of any information that aims to increase awareness of the real situation of the Internet in China,” the two organisations said. “The rights of Chinese Internet users are systematically violated by the government, although we are now only six months away from the Olympic Games.”

Just hours after the report was issued, Yang Le, the head of the Beijing Information Office, which is in charge of Internet control, circulated an order to websites and ISPs asking them to update their lists of banned key-words. The new banned key-words, mostly relating to the Internet, were used throughout the Reporters Without Borders report.

The name of the report’s author, a “Mr. Tao,” who is a Beijing website technician, was also included in the new banned word-strings, as were “Reporters Without Borders” and “Chinese Human Rights Defenders,” whose websites are inaccessible in China. This is the text of the directive issued by the Beijing Information Office:

“Urgent: Search engines must abort searches for certain key-words. This must take effect at 10:30.” The directive listed these key-words:

– “render transparent the workings of the Chinese Internet control system”
– “render transparent the workings of the Internet control system”
– “the workings of the Chinese Internet control system”
– “Chinese Internet control”
– “Chinese Internet control system”
– “how the Internet control system works”
– “Tao Xici”
– “control of the Tao Xici network”
– “Tao Xici’s China”
– “Reporters Without Borders”
– “Chinese Human Rights Defender Network”
– “reinforcement of Beijing’s control bodies”
– “self-censorship” and “increase censorship”
– “Century China”
– “Aiqinhai website”
– “technological process of Internet control in mainland China”
– “network management bodies and online media”
– “eviction of Tang Yan and Liu Xianghui”
– “adoption / registering / Internet administration”
– “Internet network”
– “key-words”
– “define unauthorised media”
– “not reveal instructions”
– “infiltration of Internet users and banning of key-words”
– “control of the Chinese Internet network”
– “pursuit of procedures for purging the Internet”
– “searches aimed at suppressing website content”
– “not reveal instructions after purging the network”
– “disseminate instructions”

Original report from Reporters Without Borders:
How cyber-censors blocked dissemination of report on Internet censorship

Posted in censorship, China, Firewall, Freedom of Information, Human Rights, Internet, News, Politics, Press freedom, search engine, Social, Technology, website, World | Comments Off on Rights Organizations’ Report Censored by China Hours After Issued, Leaked Directive Shows

Google Faces Lawsuit From Chinese Dissident

Posted by Author on February 4, 2008


By Mure Dickie in Beijing, The Financial Times, UK, February 2 2008-

A Chinese scholar who -challenged the communist government by setting up a democratic opposition party has vowed to sue US internet company Google for excising his name from its local search results.

Guo Quan’s condemnation of Google comes amid a renewed drive by Chinese authorities to clamp down on dissent ahead of the Beijing Olympics that has seen the arrest of Hu Jia, one of China’s best-known human rights activists.

The threatened lawsuit by Mr Guo, a former Nanjing university professor, highlights the anger felt by some reform-minded Chinese at the willingness of foreign companies to bow to censorship in order to gain access to China’s tightly restricted internet market.

“To make money, Google has become a servile Pekingese dog wagging its tail at the heels of the Chinese communists,” Mr Guo wrote in an open letter announcing his plan to sue the US search company.

The excision of Mr Guo’s name from google.cn raises questions about Google’s censorship policy for the two-year-old website. Google had promised to inform users when it censored searches, using a tagline that says some results have been removed “in accordance with local laws, rules and policies”.

But entering Mr Guo’s name in google.cn yesterday yielded a webpage featuring only the message: “The information you searched for cannot be accessed. Please go back to google.cn and seek other information.”

Speaking through a public relations representative, Google China said yesterday that it would not comment on political or censorship issues.

The special action against Mr Guo’s name comes after he announced late last year the creation of the New Democracy party dedicated to ending China’s “one-party dictatorship”.

Baidu.com, the Nasdaq-listed Chinese search company, and the locally controlled Chinese arm of US portal Yahoo have also blocked all searches for Mr Guo’s name.

“Baidu is a Chinese company, so I can understand how it is coerced by the Chinese Communist party,” Mr Guo wrote.

“But Google follows the party’s orders even though it is a US company, so I’m suing.”

Google’s actions had harmed the eponymous clothes company of which he was chairman – as well as the many other people in China who shared his name, said Mr Guo. A friend in the US would handle legal arrangements for his suit, he wrote, but gave no details.

Analysts say Beijing has been tightening controls on local media and the internet apparently in an effort to ensure political stability ahead of the Olympics in August.

Original report from The Financial Times

Posted in censorship, China, Company, Google, Guo Quan, Human Rights, intellectual, Internet, Law, News, People, Politics, search engine, Technology, USA, World | 1 Comment »