Status of Chinese People

About China and Chinese people's living condition

  • China Organ Harvesting Report, in 19 languages

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  • Books to Read

    1. A China More Just, Gao Zhisheng
    2.Officially Sanctioned Crime in China, He Qinglian
    3.
    Will the Boat Sink the Water? Chen Guidi, Wu Chuntao
    4.
    Losing the New China, Ethan Gutmann
    5.
    Nine Commentaries on The Communist Party, the Epochtimes
  • Did you know

    Reporters Without Borders said in it’s 2005 special report titled “Xinhua: the world’s biggest propaganda agency”, that “Xinhua remains the voice of the sole party”, “particularly during the SARS epidemic, Xinhua has for last few months been putting out news reports embarrassing to the government, but they are designed to fool the international community, since they are not published in Chinese.”
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Archive for the ‘Special day’ Category

(video) China Review: 60 Years of Killing

Posted by Author on September 30, 2009


This is the seventh of Nine Commentaries on the Communist Party, Video by NTDTV via GoogleVideo –

Foreword

The 55-year history of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is written with blood and lies. The stories behind this bloody history are both extremely tragic and rarely known. Under the rule of the CCP, 60 to 80 million innocent Chinese people have been killed, leaving their broken families behind. Many people wonder why the CCP kills. While the CCP continues its brutal persecution of Falun Gong practitioners and recently suppressed protesting crowds in Hanyuan with gunshots, people wonder whether they will ever see the day when the CCP will learn to speak with words rather than guns.

Mao Zedong summarized the purpose of the Cultural Revolution, “…after the chaos the world reaches peace, but in 7 or 8 years, the chaos needs to happen again.” [1] In other words, there should be a political revolution every 7 or 8 years and a crowd of people needs to be killed every 7 or 8 years.

A supporting ideology and practical requirements lie behind the CCP’s slaughters.

Ideologically, the CCP believes in the “dictatorship of the proletariat” and “continuous revolution under the dictatorship of the proletariat.” Therefore, after the CCP took over China, it killed the landowners to resolve problems with production relationships in rural areas. It killed the capitalists to reach the goal of commercial and industrial reform and solve the production relationships in the cities. After these two classes were eliminated, the problems related to the economic base were basically solved. Similarly, solving the problems related to the superstructure [2] also called for slaughter. The suppressions of the Hu Feng Anti-Party Group [3] and the Anti-Rightists Movement eliminated the intellectuals. Killing the Christians, Taoists, Buddhists and popular folk groups solved the problem of religions. Mass murders during the Cultural Revolution established, culturally and politically, the CCP’s absolute leadership. The Tiananmen Square massacre was used to prevent political crisis and squelch democratic demands. The persecution of Falun Gong is meant to resolve the issues of belief and traditional healing. These actions were all necessary for the CCP to strengthen its power and maintain its rule in the face of continual financial crisis (prices for consumer goods skyrocketed after the CCP took power and China’s economy almost collapsed after the Cultural Revolution), political crisis (some people not following the Party’s orders or some others wanting to share political rights with the Party) and crisis of belief (the disintegration of the former Soviet Union, political changes in Eastern Europe, and the Falun Gong issue). Except for the Falun Gong issue, almost all the foregoing political movements were utilized to revive the evil specter of the CCP and incite its desire for revolution. The CCP also used these political movements to test CCP members, eliminating those who did not meet the Party’s requirements……. (more details)

Posted in China, Communist Party, history, Killing, News, Politics, Social, Special day, Video, World | Comments Off on (video) China Review: 60 Years of Killing

Censorship and attacks on journalists in run-up to China’s 1 October anniversary

Posted by Author on September 29, 2009


Reporters Without Borders, 29 September 2009 –

“Government security paranoia in the run-up to the celebration of the 60th anniversary of the proclamation of the People’s Republic of China on 1 October has led to a reinforcement of online censorship and abusive behaviour towards foreign journalists,” Reporters Without Borders said today. “A case of police brutality towards three foreign journalists was particularly unacceptable.”

The press freedom organisation added: “What the authorities are trying to portray as a big celebration is turning into a major head-ache for Internet users and a reporters.”

Internet control agencies have redoubled efforts to prevent Internet users based in China, including foreign residents, from using censorship circumvention software such as Freegate and virtual private networks (VPN). Experts have told Reporters Without Borders that tens of thousands of IP addresses suspected by the authorities of using Freegate and VPNs, especially those that are free, have been blocked in the past few days.

“The Electronic Great Wall has never been as consolidated as it is now, on the eve of the 1 October anniversary, proving that the Chinese government is not so sure of its record,” Reporters Without Borders said. The new restrictions are making it even more difficult to access social-networking websites such Facebook and Twitter, or YouTube’s video-sharing sites, which have been blocked since July.

China’s leaders have made combating separatism one of the watchwords of the 60th anniversary, and new regulations have just been issued for combating online separatism in the far-western province of Xinjiang.

A Reporters Without Borders study of Uyghur-language and Xinjiang-based websites has established that the clampdown imposed during last July’s rioting in the province has not been loosened. Most of the sites that existed before the unrest are either still inaccessible or their content has not been updated. Of the 65 sites included in the study, 54 are still blocked for Internet users in China or abroad.

Even Tianshannet.com, a Xinjiang-based website that was held up by the authorities as an example of a site that respected the regulations, is no longer accessible. Xinjiang residents have been cut off from the Internet for almost three months and Uyghurs are being deprived of all news and information that is independent of the official media.

Three China-based Mongol websites – Mongol Ger Association (http://www.mongolger.net/), Mongol People Chat Room (MGLhun), which is hosted on the Sina.com site (http://www.sina.com.cn/), and Mongolian People (http://www.mongolhun.com/) – have been rendered inaccessible in the past few weeks. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Beijing, China, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, Journalist, News, People, Politics, Special day, World | Comments Off on Censorship and attacks on journalists in run-up to China’s 1 October anniversary

China Human Rights Briefing, August 31- September 6, 2009

Posted by Author on September 11, 2009


Chinese Human Rights Defender, Sep. 10, 2009-

Highlights

Human Rights and Democracy Activist Xie Changfa Receives Harsh Sentence:

After over a year of detention, Xie Changfa (谢长发), a China Democracy Party organizer turned human rights activist, was convicted of “subversion of state power” and sentenced to 13 years in prison by Changsha City’s Intermediate Court on September 1.  This harsh verdict echoes the original prison terms handed down to the banned Democracy Party’s founders over a decade ago, indicating that the government has not become any more tolerant of dissent or efforts by citizens to exercise their political rights or their right to defend other citizens’ rights in the intervening years.

Nation-wide Clampdown on Activists and Petitioners in Anticipation of 60th Anniversary of Founding of the People’s Republic:

As with other major events during which the eyes of the nation and world fall on Beijing, such as this past June’s anniversary of the Tiananmen Square Massacre or last year’s Olympic Games, police and officials are sparing no effort to ensure that any “unharmonious” voices are kept silent.  To that end, officials from Tianjin City, Hebei Province, Inner Mongolia, Liaoning Province, Shanxi Province and Shandong Province have agreed to work together with Beijing police to  tighten up security around the capital in the buildup to the 60th anniversary celebrations of the founding of the People’s Republic of China on October 1, including establishing checkpoints on all roadways leading towards the capital and working to “solve problems locally”, preventing petitioners from travelling to Beijing.  On the afternoon of August 29, a group of 15 Shanghai petitioners in Beijing were seized and forcibly returned home after they travelled to Tiananmen Square to watch rehearsals for the National Day celebrations.

Activists and lawyers in Beijing have been visited by police and told to leave town, subjected to enforced “tourism” with policemen, or placed under house arrest.  They are being told not to return until one week after the celebration.  On August 31, Zhang Hui (张辉), the director of the Mr. Democracy Research Institute (德先生研究所) in Beijing, was forced to leave the capital and return to his hometown in Shanxi.  This sort of harassment will only increase over the next few weeks as National Day draws nearer. …… (more details from Chinese Human Rights Defender)

Posted in Activist, China, Dissident, Human Rights, Law, News, People, Politics, Special day, World | Comments Off on China Human Rights Briefing, August 31- September 6, 2009

China Human Rights Briefing, Aug. 17-23, 2009

Posted by Author on August 26, 2009


Chinese Human Rights Defenders, Aug. 26, 2009-

HIGHLIGHTS

Persistent torture: Ten months after the UN Committee against Torture recommended the Chinese government “take immediate steps to prevent acts of torture and ill-treatment throughout the country”, the use of torture remains widespread in China, as evidenced by the harrowing tales of five ordinary individuals, Zhang Qingsong, She Shouliang, Li Yufang, Yang Qi, Wang Jiuyun, documented in this issue of CHRB. Their stories revealed that, not only are officials accustomed to using torture to extract confession and to punish those who dare challenge their authority, but victims’ calls for accountability and redress are also invariably ignored.

Gongmeng Xu Zhiyong Released, Zhuang Lu Still Missing: The release on August 23 of Xu Zhiyong, director of recently-banned legal aid center Gongmeng, came as a welcome surprise to many as he was formally arrested for “tax evasion” just days before his release. However, Xu is not yet cleared of the charge of “tax evasion” and Gongmeng remains shut down. Zhuang Lu, a staff member at Gongmeng who disappeared on the same day as Xu, remains missing. Her family, friends and colleagues still have not heard from her at the time of writing.

Beijing Rids Itself of Petitioners as Anniversary Approaches: As October 1, the 60th anniversary of the founding of the PRC, approaches, the Chinese government has stepped up its unacknowledged campaign to drive petitioners out of Beijing. Petitioners staying near Beijing South Train Station have been rendered homeless as hostel owners are no longer willing to host them due to threats by Beijing police. The CCP Central Committee Political-Legal Committee has just issued a formal document encouraging “the solution of petitioners’ problems at the grassroots level”, which essentially give the local authorities a green light to prevent petitioners from entering the capital at all cost. (details)

Posted in Activist, Beijing, China, Human Rights, Law, News, People, Politics, Social, Special day, World | Comments Off on China Human Rights Briefing, Aug. 17-23, 2009

Hong Kong Reporter Fired Over China Tiananmen Massacre Coverage

Posted by Author on August 1, 2009


By Lin Yi, The Epoch Times, Aug 1, 2009 –

HONG KONG—The Hong Kong Journalists Association (HKJA) has issued a press release criticizing South China Media for firing a reporter who had worked on a feature story about the 1989 June 4th Tiananmen Square Massacre.

According to Mak Yin-ting, chair of HKJA, the incident represented a step backward for Hong Kong media, who she believes to have stepped up “self-censorship” in order to avoid displeasing the regime in China.

HKJA called on South China Media to apologize for the firing.

Esquire magazine, published by South China Media, withdrew a feature story by the journalist, Daisy Chu. According to the press release by HKJA, they told her the articles were “seditious.” Ms. Chu disagreed with this and publicized her views on the Internet. She was fired shortly afterward, on June 29.

Mak said that this was the first time a reporter had been fired over disputes about June 4th coverage. “I saw some reporters resign because they disagreed with how the management dealt with June 4th news. However, those are the cases where reporters resigned from their positions themselves.” She also said that the managing editor was fired because of the incident as well.

In their press release, HKJA stated they were worried that the incident could set a dangerous precedent for Hong Kong journalists by discouraging them from working on “topics which are incompatible with the business interests of the owners of media companies.”

According to a July 6 report in the New Zealand Herald, Mak has said earlier this month that Hong Kong media scaled back their reporting of the Tiananmen Massacre during the 10-year anniversary this year. She also said some programs aired on TV appeared to follow the Chinese regime’s line.

The Epoch Times

Posted in Asia, Beijing, China, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, Journalist, June 4, Media, News, Newspaper, People, Politics, Social, Tiananmen, World | Comments Off on Hong Kong Reporter Fired Over China Tiananmen Massacre Coverage

Problems for China social websites

Posted by Author on July 23, 2009


p2pnet.net, July 23, 2009 –

p2pnet news view | P2P | Politics:– Two Chinese Web sites offering Twitter-like micro-blogging both went down, yesterday, supposedly for maintenance.

IndexOnCensorship has well-known blogger Wen Yunchaosaying having two sites close on the same day, “indicates pressure from authorities for them to shut down”.

The timing was probably related to the 10-year anniversary on July 22 of the banning of the Falun Gong spiritual movement, he says.

Sites that are inaccessible or aren’t working properly include Fanfou, Digu, Zuosa and Jiwai, Bloomberg News quotes Xiao Qiang, director of the Berkeley China Internet Project, as saying.

The sites work like Twitter, “allowing users to post information quickly before editors can review their submissions,” according to Qiang.

“Dr. Song Li, a very successful Chinese web-entrepreneur, seems to be pulling it off again,” said thenextweb.com (from whence came the pic) in April, going on:

“He recently launched Digu, a Chinese miniblogging service currently still in Beta that people in the West will soon unrightfully refer to as ‘the biggest Chinese Twitter’. Ok, admitted, Digu shares some major similarities with Twitter: it is a microblogging service and has a Twitterrish (or new Facebook startpage?) interface, but there is plenty more to it.

“So what makes this service so special compared to Twitter or the many Chinese Twitter copycats such as TaoTao, FanFou, Jiwai, Komoo (checkout their funky design!), Zuosa, etc etc? First of all Digu – which sounds like whisper in Chinese – focuses a lot more on both entertainment and mobile.”

Adds the story, “Song is the co-founder of MeMeStar, a Chinese mobile mobile value-added service provider  sold for $20.8 to Sina in 2003 and is founder/CEO of SinoFriends.com, a successful Chinese online dating service. Needless to say Dr. Song has enough cash to spend on his new venture so Digu is seeded very well.”

Meanwhile, the likely idea for the sites’ problems is to, “create some speed bumps for users of social networks, to slow down the spread of news and opinion contrary to the government,” Bloomberg News has Jonathan Zittrain, co-founder of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University in Cambridge, stating.

p2pnet.net

Posted in censorship, China, Freedom of Information, Human Rights, Internet, Law, Media, News, Politics, Social, Special day, Technology, website, World | Comments Off on Problems for China social websites

(video) A Decade of Courage (Part 1) – The Protest that Changed China

Posted by Author on July 20, 2009


NTDTV, Via Youtube –

Ten years after the Tiananmen Square massacre,10,000 Falun gong practitioners gathered outside China’s central leadership compound in Beijing. They had come to appeal at China’s central appeals office — to appeal for practitioners who had been abused in the city of Tianjin, for thei books, which ahd been banned, and for practitioners all over the country who were being harassed and investigated by the police.

They were met by the Chinese premier, and the arrested practitioners were released. It seemed like the appeal had been successful. But in reality, time was running out, and the brutal crackdown was getting closer and closer.

– NTDTV

Posted in April 25, Beijing, China, Falun Gong, Freedom of Belief, Human Rights, News, People, Religion, Religious, Special day, Spiritual, Tiananmen, Video, World | Comments Off on (video) A Decade of Courage (Part 1) – The Protest that Changed China

West Still Silent over 10-Year Persecution of Falun Gong

Posted by Author on July 19, 2009


Clive Ansley, US-Canada President, Coalition to Investigate the Persecution of Falun Gong in China (CIPFG ), Via Canada Free Press, July 18, 2009 –

July 20, 2009 marks an important anniversary.  But unlike most anniversaries, this is not a happy one, and provides no occasion for celebration.  Ten years ago, on July 20th, 1999 the Chinese Communist Party launched a genocidal campaign of torture, mass murder, and ultimately of genocide directed against some seventy to one hundred million Falun Gong practitioners in China.  This pogrom has continued unabated now for a full decade while the world has stood silently by, averted its eyes and essentially re-enacted the “see no evil, speak no evil, see no evil” cowardice and avarice which characterized the callous indifference of the world during the 1930’s to the growing evidence of the coming Nazi holocaust against the Jewish people.

Just as William Lyon Mackenzie King refused to allow any Jewish refugees to disembark in Canada, Canadian politicians at every level of government today demonstrate their unprincipled and craven willingness to succor the most bloodthirsty and barbarous regime since the Nazi era.  In the face of substantial and uncontradicted evidence that the Beijing police state has murdered tens of thousands of Falun Gong practitioners on the operating tables of China’s hospitals in order to harvest their organs for lucrative profits on the international transplant market; and as the most vicious and unprecedented campaign of persecution and terror against China’s lawyers unfolds before our eyes, disbarring, torturing, incarcerating and “disappearing” incredibly courageous human rights lawyers, what do our unprincipled politicians and our “Fourth Estate” have to say? What do the representatives of the legal profession in democratic countries have to say?

The mass murder of healthy Falun Gong practitioners for the sole purpose of plundering their organs constitutes the greatest Crime against Humanity since the Holocaust; the brutal persecution, terrorization, and repression of the entire “Rights Protection” bar in China constitutes the single greatest affront to the Rule of Law which the world has witnessed in a long time.  As the documentation of these crimes continues to grow exponentially, politicians such as Bob Rae assure us that while there are still some human rights problems in China, Beijing is making substantial progress and the human rights situation is improving significantly.  Our current Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mr. Cannon, thinks we should avoid publicly embarrassing the Beijing dictators about little things like organ harvesting and the bestial torture and disbarment of human rights lawyers.  The Canadian Bar Association and some provincial law societies (with the commendable exception of the Law Society of Upper Canada) have remained totally mute with respect to the treatment of their Chinese colleagues; indeed various CBA representatives continue to peddle the errant and vapid nonsense that China is committed to the Rule of Law and that reform of China’s spurious and fraudulent “legal” system is progressing at an impressive pace.

And the Fourth Estate? The pathetic North American media has been virtually mute throughout this full decade of organ theft and genocide committed by Beijing.  Hardly a word has ever appeared in print and scarcely a whisper of this mass atrocity has been heard on the television networks or cable services.  In terms of sheer undeniable newsworthiness, it is irrefutably the biggest story of this century. Yet it is apparently a taboo topic in our derelict media.  We are informed that those conscientious reporters who turn in stories on the persecution are told by their editors that their papers will not touch this topic.

Instead of offering comfort and support to the innocent victims of Beijing’s bestiality, unprincipled politicians such as those on Vancouver City Council turn the victims into the culprits and curry favour with Beijing.

This is the holocaust all over again. The Beijing Olympics was the Berlin Olympics of 1936 all over again.

Those who do not recognize this parallel are limited to the willfully blind; the morally bankrupt; and the profoundly ignorant.

And I want to end by coming back to the report—‘Bloody Harvest’—by David Matas and David Kilgour. This report MUST be addressed seriously and extensively by the North American media.

The credibility of the authors of this report is simply not in question—David Matas is perhaps the leading human rights lawyer in Canada; David Kilgour is a former Secretary of State for Far Eastern affairs in Canada; both are lawyers; and they have impeccable credentials. This is not coming from the National Enquirer or Fox News; this is coming from sources that are simply unimpeachable. And given the horrendous nature of the allegations—and the unimpeachable sources which have produced the report—crime cannot be legitimately ignored by legitimate journalists. It must be debated.

Journalists are entitled to dispute the methods of the Kilgour-Matas research; they have not done so.

Journalists are entitled to criticize the nature of the evidence; they have not done so.

Journalists are entitled to produce contrary evidence; they have not done so.

But what the legitimate media is not entitled to do is to leave their readers and viewers uninformed about credible and compelling evidence of a new holocaust.

Clive Ansley, US-Canada CIPFG President

Canada Free Press

Posted in Canada, China, Falun Gong, Freedom of Belief, Genocide, Human Rights, July 20, Law, News, People, Politics, Religion, Religious, Social, Special day, World | Comments Off on West Still Silent over 10-Year Persecution of Falun Gong

(Photos) NGOs support Falun Gong at Washington D.C Rally

Posted by Author on July 18, 2009


Photos by The Epochtimes, for Rally to end the persecution of Falun Gong, at Washington DC’s National Mall, July 16, 2009. Published on July 17, 2009-

Dr. Sue Gunawardena-Vaughn of Freedom House speaking at the rally

Dr. Sue Gunawardena-Vaughn of Freedom House speaking at the rally

Wendy Wright, President of Concerned Women for America, speaking at the rally

Wendy Wright, President of Concerned Women for America, speaking at the rally

Faith McDonad, Director of Religious Liberty Programs/Institute on Religion and Democracy, speaking at the rally

Faith McDonad, Director of Religious Liberty Programs/Institute on Religion and Democracy, speaking at the rally

Patricia Burkhardt of Church Women United, speaking at the rally

Patricia Burkhardt of Church Women United, speaking at the rally

Michael Horowitz of Hudson Institute, speaking at the rally

Michael Horowitz of Hudson Institute, speaking at the rally

Ms. Erin Weston of Jubilee Campaign USA, speaking at the rally

Ms. Erin Weston of Jubilee Campaign USA, speaking at the rally

Rev. Clark Lobenstine, Executive Director of The InterFaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington, speaking at the rally

Rev. Clark Lobenstine, Executive Director of The InterFaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington, speaking at the rally

Patrick Mohoney, director of Christian Defense Coalition, speaking at the rally

Patrick Mohoney, director of Christian Defense Coalition, speaking at the rally

Suzanne Scholte, President of Defense Forum Foundation, speaking at the rally

Suzanne Scholte, President of Defense Forum Foundation, speaking at the rally

Jim Geheran, Director of Initiatives for China, speaking at the rally

Jim Geheran, Director of Initiatives for China, speaking at the rally

Genghe, wife of detained prominent Chinese lawyer Gao Zhisheng, speaking at the rally

Genghe, wife of detained prominent Chinese lawyer Gao Zhisheng, speaking at the rally

Tang Boqiao, Chairman of China Peace, speaking at the rally

Tang Boqiao, Chairman of China Peace, speaking at the rally

Posted in China, Event, Falun Gong, Freedom of Belief, Human Rights, July 20, News, People, Photo, Rally, Religion, Social, Special day, World | Comments Off on (Photos) NGOs support Falun Gong at Washington D.C Rally

10 years on, Falun Gong shows strength

Posted by Author on July 18, 2009


By Shaun Tandon (AFP) , July 28, 2009-

WASHINGTON — Ten years after China banned the Falungong spiritual movement, the two sides are waging a battle both at home and abroad where the group has become a nagging thorn in Beijing’s side.

Falun Gong has taken its case straight to the Western street, where rallies highlighting the group’s signature breathing exercises and grisly photos of purported victims of China’s crackdown have become a fixture.

Falungong has tried to show its strength ahead of the anniversary of China’s ban on July 20, 1999, with thousands of supporters converging on Washington in yellow shirts for public speeches, prayers and vigils.

Sixty-two members of the US Congress signed a letter to President Barack Obama to denounce “one of the most unjust and cruel persecutions of our times.”

The lawmakers called on the Obama administration to speak out to China to end “the extreme brutality of the persecution faced by Falungong practitioners.”

Even for China, which in the past two years has witnessed deadly unrest involving Uighur and Tibetan minorities, Falungong remains an especially sensitive topic and is rarely mentioned by state media.

Unveiled in 1992 by Li Hongzhi, who now lives quietly in the New York area, Falungong emphasizes moral teachings and Qigong, slow graceful movements (and sometimes breathing techniques), to promote the circulation of qi within the human body, and enhance a practitioner’s overall health.

It was once encouraged by Chinese authorities to ease the burden on a creaky health system.

However, aghast after thousands of Falungong supporters gathered in Beijing to protest against persecution, China’s then president Jiang Zemin issued orders in 1999 to eliminate the group. China later declared it an “evil cult.”

Falungong says that more than 3,200 practitioners have since died from persecution and that Chinese authorities have harvested their organs.

While it is impossible to independently verify each case, Falungong supporters and relatives speak of constant monitoring and harassment.

Jin Pang, 26, a Chinese student in the United States, said her mother was taken away with some 100 other Falungong practitioners in the eastern city of Weifang in July last year ahead of the Beijing Olympics. She has not heard from her mother since.

Jin, who has sought help from dozens of US politicians, fears the worst. She said police held her mother for 11 days in 2001 and beat her with electric batons that burned her body. She said her mother was freed after police demanded 2,000 yuan (300 dollars) from the family……. (more details from AFP)

Posted in China, Falun Gong, Freedom of Belief, Human Rights, July 20, Law, News, People, Politics, Religion, Religious, Social, Special day, USA, World | Comments Off on 10 years on, Falun Gong shows strength

(photos) US Congress members support Falun Gong at Washington D.C. Rally

Posted by Author on July 18, 2009


Photos by The Epochtimes, July 17, 2009-

Rally to end the persecution  of Falun Gong, Washington D.C, July 16, 2009 (By the Epochtimes)

Rally to end the persecution of Falun Gong, Washington D.C, July 16, 2009 (By the Epochtimes)

Congress woman Ms. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congress woman Ms. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congressman Mr. Christopher Smith speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congressman Mr. Christopher Smith speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congressman Mr. Dana Rohrabacher speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congressman Mr. Dana Rohrabacher speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congressman Mr. Roscoe Bartlett speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congressman Mr. Roscoe Bartlett speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congress woman Ms. Sheila Jackson Lee speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congress woman Ms. Sheila Jackson Lee speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congressman Mr. Lincoln Diaz-Balart speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congressman Mr. Lincoln Diaz-Balart speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congressman Mr. William Clay speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congressman Mr. William Clay speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congressman Mr. Gus Bilirakis speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congressman Mr. Gus Bilirakis speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congressman Mr. Anh Joseph Cao speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Congressman Mr. Anh Joseph Cao speaking at the rally (by the Epochtimes)

Posted in China, Event, Falun Gong, Freedom of Belief, Human Rights, July 20, News, People, Photo, politician, Rally, Religion, Special day, USA, World | Comments Off on (photos) US Congress members support Falun Gong at Washington D.C. Rally

Pictures of the Day, July 17 – Falun Gong mark the 10th anniversary of China’s ban

Posted by Author on July 18, 2009


Pictures of the Day, The Wall Street Journal, July 17, 2009-

Hundreds of Falun Gong parishioners meditated through body movements on Washington’s National Mall Thursday to mark the 10th anniversary of China’s ban on the practice.

Hundreds of Falun Gong parishioners meditated through body movements on Washington’s National Mall Thursday to mark the 10th anniversary of China’s ban on the practice.

More photos from The Wall Street Journal’s Pictures of the Day

Posted in China, Falun Gong, Freedom of Belief, Human Rights, July 20, News, People, Photo, Religious, Social, Special day, Spiritual, USA, World | 1 Comment »

Speech: Falun Gong As Decade Long Victims of Rule by Terror

Posted by Author on July 17, 2009


By Hon. David Kilgour, via mwcnews.net, July 17, 2009

Falun Gong As Decade Long Victims of Rule by Terror

Media Conference , 130s Centre Block, House of Commons
Ottawa ,16 July 2009
Hon. David Kilgour

Almost exactly ten years ago, the party-state in Beijing launched its campaign against a government-estimated 70-100 million Falun Gong practitioners. The then determinedly-non-political Falun Gong, which is an exercise community with a spiritual component, soon became the latest in a long list of  ‘enemies of the party’.  Atrocities against Falun Gong supporters continue today across China.

Reigns of terror against Party-selected groups and persons  have occurred periodically since Mao Zedong seized power in 1949. In the name of revolution, millions were starved to death, for example, in the Great Leap Forward of 1958; countless others were tortured, abused, executed and deprived of basic human dignity.  Probably very few Chinese citizens have been treated more brutally than the Falun Gong.

Organ pillaging from Falun Gong practitioners has been studied in an independent report by legal scholar David Matas and myself ( http://organharvestinginvestigation.net ).  The two of us found 52 kinds of evidentiary proof indicating that this crime against humanity is occurring.  The Government of China has  to date made no substantive response to our report.

Just this month, three lawyers were arrested in China for daring to defend Falun Gong practitioners. The persecution of  another prominent attorney, Gao Zhisheng, who defended Falun Gong, continues.  He was twice arrested and suffered seventy days of torture. Despite repeated appeals from a range of Chinese and international groups for accounts of his whereabouts and release, Beijing ignores them.

Genocide?

David Matas to the International Association of Genocide Scholars at George Mason University in Arlington, Virginia, concluded on June 9th of this year:

”Every Chinese embassy around the world participates in this incitement (against Falun Gong). Despite their denials, they have to know about the mass killings of Falun Gong practitioners. The evidence fills human rights reports. There are constant media stories. The information is a click of a mouse away on the internet. Any claim of ignorance would mean that they have wilfully been turning blind eyes to the obvious, not a defense in law. So, in sum, the crime of genocide has been committed against the Falun Gong community, through torture, through organ harvesting and through the incitement that leads to both. The elements of the crime, the mass killings based on identity and the intent to destroy the group, can be established. ”

Mr. Matas provided detailed reasons for coming to this legal conclusion, which are available in the Update section of our report website.

China’s Gulag

Forced labour is tragically all too common today, but only the party-state of China uses it to punish and suppress fellow citizens. Any Chinese national can be sent to a camp without any form of trial for up to four years upon committal by a police signature. No appeal is possible. Mao in the 1950s closely duplicated the work camp model set up in Stalin’s Russia and Hitler’s Germany, which in China alone continues today.

In China, only Falun Gong camp inmates are used as a live organ bank to be pillaged for sales to foreigners or Chinese nationals. Medical testing is required before organs can be matched with recipients, but only Falun Gong prisoners in the camp populations are tested medically on a regular basis. In the estimated 340 camps across China as of 2005, up to 300,000 “workers” toil in inhuman conditions for up to sixteen hours daily without any pay, producing a wide range of consumer products, mostly for export in blatant violation of World Trade Organization rules.

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Such practices are fully consistent with Beijing`s rejection of the recommendations advanced by a number of governments, including Canada’s, in a Universal Periodic Review by the UN Human Rights Council earlier this year……. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Canada, China, Crime against humanity, David Kilgour, Falun Gong, Freedom of Belief, Genocide, Human Rights, July 20, Law, News, People, Religion, Religious, Special day, World | Comments Off on Speech: Falun Gong As Decade Long Victims of Rule by Terror

Falun Gong rallies in US on 10-year anniversary of crackdown

Posted by Author on July 17, 2009


AFP, July 16, 2009-

WASHINGTON — Hundreds of supporters of the Falun Gong spiritual movement have rallied in Washington ahead of the 10th anniversary of its ban by China, with a special push to free a prominent rights lawyer.

China banned Falun Gong, whose Buddhist-inspired teachings focus on exercises, on July 20, 1999. Beijing has since branded Falun Gong an “evil cult” and sometimes brutally suppressed its practitioners.

Hundreds of Falun Gong members wearing yellow shirts converged outside of the US Capitol, holding banners demanding that China “end the persecution” and handing out fliers to passers-by.

“One must wonder exactly why Falun Gong, a serene movement based upon traditional Chinese breathing exercises and meditation, has drawn such a frenzied response,” Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen told the rally.

“The answer, my friends, is all too simple,” the Republican said. “Falun Gong stands for the principles of truthfulness, compassion and tolerance. These principles represent the very antithesis of what the Communist Party of China stands for — lies, brutality and intolerance.”

Dana Rohrabacher, another outspoken critic of Beijing in the US Congress, pledged that “we will not forget the persecution and the prosecution of the Falun Gong.

“You have remained courageous. You have gained the attention of good people throughout the world. That is what will change the world — not violence, but open hands and open hearts,” he said.

Falun Gong supporters pleaded for the release of Gao Zhisheng, a lawyer who has been tipped for the Nobel Peace Prize who defended the spiritual movement, underground Christians and other unpopular groups.

Chinese authorities took him away on February 4 and he has not been heard from since, colleagues say.

His wife Geng He, who defected with their children to the United States in March, told the rally that Gao felt obliged to fight persecution that has gone “beyond anyone’s imagination.”

“Gao has said that to end this nation’s sufferings, we need people with high morals. Falun Gong practitioners have done so, and we must also do our part,” she said.

ChinaAid, a Christian rights group, said it delivered petitions with 100,000 signatures seeking Gao’s release to the Chinese embassy in Washington and the US State Department.

AFP

Posted in China, Event, Falun Gong, Freedom of Belief, Genocide, Human Rights, July 20, Law, News, People, Rally, Religion, Religious, Social, Special day, USA, World | Comments Off on Falun Gong rallies in US on 10-year anniversary of crackdown

China’s Falun Gong still suppressed after 10 year’s crackdown

Posted by Author on July 17, 2009


By Julia Duin, The Washington Times, USA, Thursday, July 16, 2009 –

At noon Thursday on the lower west terrace lawn of the U.S. Capitol, members of Congress, human rights and religious freedom activists will meet to commemorate a sad anniversary: 10 years of imprisonment and torture of the Chinese meditation group Falun Gong.

You may remember how Wenyi Wang, a reporter for the Epoch Times, sneaked into the press section during an April 20, 2006, speech on the South Lawn of the White House just before Chinese President Hu Jintao was to give a speech. Suddenly, “Stop persecuting Falun Gong,” she screamed while unfurling a yellow banner with the group’s name on it. It took several minutes for the Secret Service to arrest her.

Falun Gong is a Chinese spiritual discipline that is Buddhist in nature. It consists of moral teachings, meditation and four exercises that resemble tai-chi.

The group says 3,200 of its members, at a minimum, have been tortured to death by the Chinese government. It cites Wang Lixuan, who had to watch her 7-month-old son die in front of her after he was hung upside down. Then police broke her neck and crushed her skull.

Then there are the forced organ transplants, one of the things Miss Wenyi was protesting. Just before her White House visit, this newspaper interviewed a Chinese journalist who uncovered a secret detention center in northern China that was used to harvest human organs for sale to domestic and international buyers. (The Chinese, of course, denied such a place exists.) The journalist estimated 6,000 Falun Gong prisoners were being mined for body parts. The U.N. Special Rapporteur on Torture, which chronicled the practice in March 2007, said the harvesting began in 2001.

What got the communist government going on April 25,1999, was the Falun Gong’s ability to summon 10,000 of its practitioners, standing in silent protest, in a mass demonstration in Zhongnanhai, the government’s compound in Beijing. The government struck back July 20, arresting the ringleaders of the April demonstration. Thousands of practitioners, the Falun Gong says, were dragged from their beds at dawn that day by police.

The Falun Gong is one of many groups I have listed in the fat religious persecution folder in my office. Buddhists, Muslims (especially out west) and Christians likewise get brutalized in China. But the Falun Gong, whose numbers were 70 million to 100 million at its height, seem to outrage the Chinese leaders the most. Maybe it’s because the Falun Gong outnumbered the membership of the Communist Party and their practices are so quintessentially Chinese.

New Jersey Reps. Christopher H. Smith, a Republican, and Robert E. Andrews, a Democrat, plus 59 other members of Congress wrote a July 8 letter to President Obama asking that, “In view of the extreme brutality of the persecution faced by Falun Gong practitioners, our government should speak very clearly and specifically on their behalf to the Chinese government.”

Mr. Obama hasn’t said much about religious persecution during his brief time in office and the U.S. government isn’t exactly known for standing up to China on human rights issues. Our massive indebtedness to China gives us little heft when it comes to pressuring them. But where there’s a will, there’s a way and the Falun Gong deserves a break.

Julia Duin’s Stairway to Heaven column runs Thursdays and Sundays. Contact her at jduin@washingtontimes.com.

The Washington Times

Posted in China, Falun Gong, Freedom of Belief, Genocide, Human Rights, July 20, Law, News, People, Politics, Religion, Religious, Special day, USA, World | Comments Off on China’s Falun Gong still suppressed after 10 year’s crackdown

Rally July 19: Crackdowns in China prompt rally in Washington DC

Posted by Author on July 15, 2009


Rally anouncement, The China Support Network (CSN)-

CSN invites the public for July 19 (2009) rally, 3-6pm
Marking the tenth anniversary of Falun Gong persecution in China

“I think that one year of genocide is too much. So why are we talking about ten?” This rhetorical question sets up the speech we anticipate to be delivered by John Kusumi, founder of the China Support Network (CSN), at a Washington DC rally upcoming on Sunday, July 19 2009. Rock band Light Club, known for its songs that present Chinese human rights issues in the form of American rock music, will also appear and debut a new sonic experience to boost Chinese human rights. Live streaming video of the event will be viewable in China (to those who can get around the Great Firewall of regime-sponsored internet blockage.)

These are weighty times in the China issue. On July 5, the CCP (Chinese Communist Party-led government) commenced a new crackdown with a massacre of Uyghur residents in the city of Urumqi in the west of China. News reports have likened that crackdown to the one which occurred in Tibet last year. China’s President Hu Jintao quickly abandoned the G8 summit and left Italy to return to China.

“He had to hurry home to commit genocide and crimes against humanity,” offered CSN’s John Kusumi as his interpretation of the move. Kusumi has also published an article, “What recently happened with Uyghurs?” that offers more nuanced analysis and is currently making its way around the internet.

Kusumi offered some more perspective by saying, “The China Support Network began in order to denounce one crackdown, the Tiananmen Square crackdown [of 1989]. Now look at what is on our plate today: Tiananmen crackdown [1989], Falun Gong crackdown [1999-present], Tibetan crackdown [of 2008], and Uyghur crackdown [of 2009]. The CCP can’t finish having one problem before it commences to add new ones into the record of history.”

In terms of death toll, the Falun Gong crackdown is the biggest and deadliest, followed by the 1989 Tiananmen crackdown, the 2009 Uyghur crackdown, and the 2008 Tibetan crackdown in that order. Hence, it is fitting that the rally which is planned for Sunday on the National Mall (between 3rd and 4th Streets, in Washington DC) is in observance of the tenth anniversary of the still-ongoing Falun Gong crackdown. “The Communists are stubborn, and don’t change their ways,” observed Kusumi.

The rally is sponsored by Friends of Falun Gong, with the China Support Network and Light Club as co-sponsors. Thousands of Falun Gong practitioners are likely to be in attendance. Additional music and speeches will come from other quarters as well. The China Support Network and Light Club are mainstream in the Chinese pro-democracy movement, and their starting point was response to the 1989 Tiananmen massacre. They have strongly supported the Falun Gong, and so the program will now blend these angles into a more general angle that is pro-freedom and in line with the international human rights community.

Light Club is an American rock act started by CSN man Tim Britt. Britt is the band leader, songwriter, guitarist, and at the University of Hartford, Britt is a professor of audio technology. Previous rallies have heard performances of “Remember Tiananmen Square,” “Freedom First, Olympics Second,” and “Bye Bye CCP.” Could there be something new this year? Yes. According to Kusumi, “It’s safe to spill the beans. This will be the premier live performance of ‘Chinese Democracy Defiled.’ It nicely rounds out an excellent quartet of songs for this cause. The existence of the song is not a secret; it’s already on MySpace. What will be new is to hear it live with a large audience.”

For those who want to preview the new song, ‘Chinese Democracy Defiled,’ it is at www.myspace.com/lightclubmusic.

– by The China Support Network

Posted in China, Event, Falun Gong, Human Rights, July 20, News, Rally, Special day, USA, World | Comments Off on Rally July 19: Crackdowns in China prompt rally in Washington DC

Hong Kong carries the flame for Tiananmen Massacre

Posted by Author on June 6, 2009


By Paul Lin 林保華, The Taipei Times, Taiwan, Saturday, Jun 06, 2009-

Thursday marked the 20th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square Massacre. For 20 years, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has created a mass of lies about what happened and has used China’s economic development to cover up its murderous acts.

Self-styled anti-communist President Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九) has said he has been deeply moved by the CCP’s progress. In stark contrast, the people of Hong Kong have been staging a protest on the Sunday before June 4 each year; this year they also held a candlelight vigil on June 4, which was attended by tens of thousands of people in Victoria Park.

Sunday’s demonstration saw the biggest turnout since 1992, which means that it was the largest since handover. But there was more to the protest than the 20th anniversary of the massacre: Recent actions of the CCP and the Hong Kong government also set off anti-CCP feelings among Hong Kong residents.

First, the CCP has been trying to establish a second power base in Hong Kong to intervene directly in government affairs because it is unsatisfied with the administration’s insistence that “Hong Kong people rule Hong Kong.”

Second, on the eve of Tiananmen Square Massacre memorial services, Chief Executive Donald Tsang (曾蔭權) — under pressure from Beijing — tried to use China’s economic development to gloss over the murderous acts of the CCP, claiming that this represented the opinion of the people of Hong Kong. Tsang immediately apologized, but his comments caused an uproar.

Third, early last month, Hong Kong University Students’ Union chairman Ayo Chan (陳一諤) said at a forum on the Tiananmen Square Massacre that China should rehabilitate the June 4 movement. But he added that the suppression could have been avoided if students had dispersed before the crackdown. Chan also described Beijing’s bloody actions as being “slightly problematic” and said Beijing should not be blamed. As a result, students at the university organized a referendum to recall Chan.

Fourth, during the live talk show City Forum on Radio Television Hong Kong late last month, Stanley Lui (呂智偉), the convener of the Hong Kong Youth Development Network, said the early part of the student movement was patriotic. But he said that when Lee Cheuk-yan (李卓人), vice chairman of the Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements of China, brought donations from Hong Kong to Beijing, the movement changed in character. This reference to support for China’s democratic movement in Hong Kong as a “cash transfer” incensed Hong Kong’s democrats.

As many as 61.2 percent of Hong Kongers now think that the Tiananmen student movement should be rehabilitated, an increase of 12 percentage points compared with last year and the highest figure since 1997.

The Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements of China and the pro-democracy camp consist of moderates and radicals, with the moderates being the mainstream. Although the factions quarrel and pro-China media and politicians take the opportunity to discredit them, they unite at crucial times to stop pro-China lawmakers from changing legislative procedures. They also stage joint protests, because they know who the common enemy is.

The people of Hong Kong are pragmatic and do nothing that strays too far from their goals. Their support for China’s democracy movement is a sincere contribution; they avoid attacking one another in order to make best use of limited resources. They stand up when the values they believe in are in crisis. They did so six years ago when China forced through its National Security Law, and they are doing so now as the truth of the Tiananmen Square Massacre struggles to be heard.

Paul Lin is a political commentator.

The Taipei Times

Posted in Asia, Beijing, China, Hong kong, Human Rights, June 4, News, People, politician, Politics, Social, Special day, Tiananmen, World | Comments Off on Hong Kong carries the flame for Tiananmen Massacre

China’s ‘socialist road’ to misery

Posted by Author on June 4, 2009


By Jeff Jacoby, Globe Columnist, The Boston Globe, USA, June 3, 2009 –

IT IS 20 YEARS since the Tiananmen Square massacre, and China’s communist regime hasn’t budged an inch.

The government has no reason to regret its murderous crackdown during “the political storm at the end of the 1980s,” a foreign-ministry spokesman in Beijing told reporters last month. “China has scored remarkable success in its social and economic development. Facts have proven that the socialist road with Chinese characteristics that we pursue is in the fundamental interests of our people.”

As a euphemism for dictatorial savagery, “the socialist road with Chinese characteristics” may not rise to the level of, say, “Great Leap Forward” or “Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution.” And certainly the material riches and capitalist bustle that characterize much of China in the 21st century are a far cry from the mass starvation and unspeakable chaos that devastated the country in the 20th. But make no mistake: The junta in Beijing is no kinder or gentler today than it was at Tiananmen 20 years ago, and no less prepared to crush anyone who resists its grip on power.

Perhaps nothing today so exemplifies the totalitarian implacability of China’s rulers as their ruthless persecution of Falun Gong, a quasi-religious discipline of meditation and breathing exercises, combined with moral teachings about truth, compassion, and forbearance. By civilized standards, it is incomprehensible that anything so innocuous and peaceable could provoke bloody repression. But China’s uncivilized government fears any movement it does not control, and Falun Gong – with its uplifting values so different from the regime’s Stalinist ethic – has attracted tens of millions of adherents, independent of the Communist Party.

There is nothing subtle about Beijing’s decade-long campaign to suppress Falun Gong. At http://www.faluninfo.net/gallery/12, the Falun Dafa Information Center describes several of the torture techniques the government uses to break Falun Gong practitioners. Burning, for example. In hundreds of reported cases, police or labor camp authorities have used cigarettes, car lighters, or red-hot irons to sear Falun Gong believers on their faces, torsos, and genitals .

Other victims have been forced into water dungeons – locked cages immersed in filthy water. “Some water dungeons . . . have sharp spikes protruding on the inside of cramped cages,” the center reports. “Usually, the water dungeons are well-hidden rooms or cells where practitioners are forced to stay for days and nights on end in total darkness. The water is most often extremely filthy, containing garbage and sewage that leaves the victim with festering skin.” Other torture methods include electric shock, brutal forced “feeding” with concentrated salt water or hot pepper oil, and injection of nerve-damaging psychotropic drugs capable of inducing “horrific states of physical pain and mental anguish.”

Independent and third parties have raised numerous alarms about China’s inhumane war on Falun Gong.

The UN’s Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial Executions has cited reports of “harrowing scenes” of Falun Gong prisoners dying from their treatment in government custody, and noting that “the cruelty and brutality of these alleged acts of torture defy description.” Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch have repeatedly highlighted the agonies inflicted on Falun Gong practitioners. So have a handful of supremely courageous Chinese lawyers, among them Gao Zhisheng and Li Heping. In 2007, Canadian attorney David Kilgour, a former prosecutor and member of Parliament, co-authored a detailed report documenting the systematic harvesting of vital organs from imprisoned Falun Gong believers, in order to supply China’s lucrative transplant industry.

All these atrocities, of course, account for only one narrow lane on that “socialist road with Chinese characteristics” that Beijing so adamantly defends. The government of China is no less vicious in its persecution of devout house Christians, of Tibetan Buddhists, of democratic dissidents who seek greater liberty, of journalists who fail to toe the Communist Party line, of the countless inmates enslaved in “re-education through labor” camps, or of women who wish to decide for themselves how many children to have.

Twenty years after the screams and blood and slaughter at Tiananmen Square, the People’s Republic of China is still a great dungeon. “China is first and foremost a repressive regime,” the noted China scholar Ross Terrill has written. “The unchanging key to all Beijing’s policies is that the nation is ruled by a Leninist dictatorship that intends to remain such.” That was the truth in 1989. It remains the truth today.

Jeff Jacoby can be reached at jacoby@globe.com

The Boston Globe

Posted in Beijing, China, Communist Party, Falun Gong, Human Rights, Incident, June 4, News, Opinion, People, Politics, Social, Special day, Tiananmen, World | Comments Off on China’s ‘socialist road’ to misery

What must be sacrificed for a future in China

Posted by Author on June 4, 2009


By Irwin Cotler and David Grossman, Citizen Special, The Ottawa Citizen, Canada, June 4, 2009 –

Gao Zhisheng rose from poverty to become one of China’s best lawyers — even making the country’s “top 10” list in 2001. He taught himself the law and stood up for justice. He gained fame as a human rights attorney defending China’s otherwise voiceless victims. And the government tolerated him, for a while.

Wang Bingzhang was a prominent lung surgeon in late 1970s China. He was chosen to be among the first Chinese doctors allowed to study abroad — and this is what brought him to Canada’s McGill University. While here, Wang began to appreciate what true freedom felt like.

Both Gao and Wang began their lives thriving in a China that could offer them great personal success — for a price. That price was silence: silence in the face of totalitarian control, silence in the face of systematic human rights abuses, silence in the face of oppression and repression.

Gao and Wang had the option of staying silent and reaping the rewards. But both chose to speak out against injustice.

Gao’s life changed when he started representing Christians and Falun Gong practitioners who were persecuted and tortured in China. He was convicted of “inciting subversion” and, in December 2006, began his new life of constant monitoring, frequent confinement to his apartment, and repeated abductions and beatings — for both him and his family.

The next year, in response to his letter to U.S. Congress, Gao was detained for 59 days, during which time he was severely tortured. The year after that, Gao’s 15-year-old daughter was barred from school, leaving her depressed and suicidal. This prompted Gao’s family to run away to the United States this January; thereafter, Gao — still under 24-hour surveillance by the government — ominously “disappeared.” He was last seen being abducted by police officers in Shaanxi province, and has not been heard from since.

As for Wang, after his experience in Canada in 1979, he worked tirelessly to become the leader of China’s overseas democracy movement. In 2002, while visiting with labour activists in Vietnam, he was forcibly abducted and carried into China, where he was immediately apprehended by police. A closed-door trial — at which Wang was not granted the right to speak, and at which no evidence was presented against him — led to his conviction and sentence of life imprisonment. A 30-minute appeal later confirmed the verdict.

Wang is now in his seventh year of arbitrary detention by China, as confirmed by the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention. He has suffered three strokes in that time, all suffered while being kept in solitary confinement. His health is rapidly deteriorating and he is plagued by depression.

Wang has a daughter named Ti-Anna, in remembrance of the Tiananmen Square massacre. A Montrealer, she decided to delay her studies at McGill University this year to devote herself to campaigning for her father’s freedom.

After many delays, the Chinese government finally approved Ti-Anna’s visa to visit her father last month under strict conditions. And then, without any explanation, she was turned away at the border; her visa was cancelled. Repeated attempts to obtain a rationale from the Chinese embassy have proven fruitless.

And so this is where we are 20 years after Tiananmen Square. Heroes of democracy and justice, like Gao and Wang, see their rights — and the rights of their loved ones — trampled upon, because they spoke out for what is right. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Canada, China, Gao Zhisheng, Human Rights, June 4, Law, Lawyer, News, People, Politics, Social, Special day, Spiritual, World | Comments Off on What must be sacrificed for a future in China

China’s regime hasn’t changed

Posted by Author on June 4, 2009


Calgary Herald, Canada, June 4, 2009-

Today marks the 20th anniversary of the culmination of the Chinese government’s savage crackdown on the pro-democracy protesters in Tiananmen Square and while, on the surface, China appears to be almost an entirely different country, the ugly methods by which the country’s oppressive government retains power remain the same.

Once an isolated and murderous Communist enclave which kept its shutters tightly bolted, China has become the world’s workshop, an exemplar of freewheeling capitalism with seemingly endless supplies of cheap labour harnessed to fuel global demand for consumer goods. China is now an economic heavyweight with leaders who receive deferential hearings at the most prestigious summits.Last sum-mer, China even garnered the ultimate laurel of international respectability when it played host to the 2008 Olympics. This is quite a sea change for a nation which, only two decades past, was slaughtering its own citizens for the crime of demanding a voice in their own governance.

On closer inspection, however, the changes at the political level are only skin deep. The Communist Party still reigns supreme and brooks no opposition. Human rights abuses against dissidents and vulnerable members of society such as prisoners, the Falun Gong, Christians and the poor are still widespread and often unchecked. Reports of naysayers being silenced via the harvesting of their vital organs still surface.

The party often claims that it is clamping down in the name of stability and social harmony, but more and more this looks like naked aggression designed to nip potential challengers in the bud. Protesters of all stripes, not just democracy activists, are still routinely detained. For instance, nearly 20,000 schoolchildren died in last year’s earthquake in the province of Sichuan, victims of shoddy school construction and China’s culture of endemic corruption and low accountability. Bereaved parents trying to raise awareness of the issue and secure punishment for those responsible have been threatened, detained and silenced by a government anxious to cover its tracks and avoid any sign that it is susceptible to popular opinion.

When foreigners protest, China’s stock response is to claim that the complaints constituteunwarrantedinterference in its sovereign affairs. Sadly, many countries and businesses seem willing to go along with this out of self-interest.

Were the Tiananmen Square protests to happen today, there is little doubt that the party’s response would be the same –a massive crackdown and killing of those involved. The only difference would be the world’s reaction.There would be token condemnations but little or nothing in the way of sanctions. China is such a vital cog in the economy that few outside parties would turn their backs on the regime or do more than wish for the whole mess to go away.

The legacy of the Tiananmen protests is one of failure because China has changed the world more than the world has changed China.

The Calgary Herald

Posted in Beijing, China, Commentary, Communist Party, Human Rights, Incident, June 4, Killing, military, News, Politics, Social, Special day, World | Comments Off on China’s regime hasn’t changed

China’s harassment of activists escalates ahead of Tiananmen anniversary

Posted by Author on June 3, 2009


Amnesty International, 03 June 2009 –

The Chinese authorities have stepped up curbs on dissenting voices and escalated censorship of activists throughout the country, said Amnesty International today, a day before the 20th anniversary of the Tiananmen crackdown.

Roseann Rife, Asia-Pacific Deputy Director at Amnesty International, said:

‘Cutting off communication and preventing movement will not stop activists from fighting for their rights and will not stop people from marking the twentieth anniversary of the crackdown. The quest for truth will only be fuelled by excessive harassment.’

The reports come as survivors of the crackdown Shao Jiang, Dr. Wang Rongfen and Yenhua Wu assemble at Amnesty’s Human Rights Action centre in London to tell their stories (3 June) and lay flowers of commemoration outside the Chinese embassy (4 June). Amnesty members across the UK will hold candlelit vigils and will re-name local squares ‘Tiananmen Square’ as an act of solidarity.

Amnesty International is calling on the Chinese authorities to hold an open and independent inquiry into the 1989 violent military crackdown on peaceful demonstrators in and around Tiananmen Square. The organisation is urging people to sign an international online petition, calling for an inquiry, at www.protectthehuman.com/tiananmen.

Over the past few days, Amnesty International has received reports of serious harassment of human rights activists:

In Beijing, HIV/AIDS activist, Wan Yanhai, was forced to travel to the northern city of Changchun ahead of the anniversary. Police officers knocked at his door and requested he leave to ‘avoid possible conflict’. He refused but was forced to board a train to leave the capital with his family.

On 3 June, Zeng Jinyan, carrying her infant daughter, attempted to leave home to attend her mother’s birthday celebration. Five policemen roughly pushed her back inside and told her she was not allowed to leave the house in the coming days.

On 3 June, in Hangzhou, police officers gathered outside the house of human rights activist Wen Kejian and invited him for a ‘talk’.

On 2 June, two police officers and four ‘Neighbourhood/Residential Committee” members were stationed outside the Shanghai-based reproductive rights activist, Mao Hengfeng’s house. They forced her back inside after she attempted to leave and told her she was forbidden to go out until the 4 June anniversary was over.

On 2 June, in Inner Mongolia, internal security police reportedly took away internet writer Tian Yongde at around 3:30pm, while he was visiting his mother in hospital. His whereabouts are currently unknown.

On 1 June, police took up positions outside the houses of lawyers Jiang Tianyong and Li Xiongbing, and other police drive them wherever they go.

At midnight on 2 June, lawyers Lan Zhixue and Tang Jitian were discussing a case in the offices of an NGO. When they were leaving in the early hours of 3 June, police took the two lawyers in for questioning. They have not yet been released.

In order to limit communication between activists and internet campaigners, Chinese authorities have shut down Twitter, Flickr and Hotmail.

Background

Amnesty International has documented at least one hundred cases of activists who have been detained briefly or faced violence from authorities this year as they defended land rights, housing rights and labour rights. Signatories of the Charter 08, a petition calling for legal and political reforms, continue to face questioning.

Recently, lawyers have been threatened with denial of their licences in retaliation for their work on human rights defence cases. On 31 May, at least 18 lawyers still had not received their license renewals by the 6pm deadline. These lawyers, from 11 different law firms, are involved in defending and providing legal aid to Tibetans who were detained in connection with March 2008 protests, Falun Gong practitioners, human rights defenders detained for exercising freedom of expression, families of victims of the Sichuan earthquake, families of victims of the poisoned milk powder scandal, and other public interest cases. Some of them have called for the democratic election of Beijing lawyers Association executive committee members and are thus being targeted.

Amnesty International

Posted in Activist, Beijing, China, Dissident, Human Rights, June 4, Law, News, People, Politics, Social, Special day, Tiananmen, World | Comments Off on China’s harassment of activists escalates ahead of Tiananmen anniversary

Taiwan urged to export democracy to China

Posted by Author on June 1, 2009


REMEMBERING TIANANMEN:  A conference in Taipei yesterday heard calls for Taiwan’s government to initiate discussions on human rights issues during cross-strait talks

By Loa Iok-sin, STAFF REPORTER,The Taipei Times,Taiwan, Monday, Jun 01, 2009-

It’s about time for Taiwan to become an “exporter of democracy,” speakers at a conference on the 1989 Tiananmen Massacre said in Taipei yesterday, urging the government to discuss human rights issues during cross-strait negotiations.

“China has become an ‘exporter of authoritarianism — not because of any ideological reasons, but for its own national interests,” said Yiong Cong-ziin (楊長鎮), director of the Democratic Progressive Party’s (DPP) Department of Social Movement.

“China has become strikingly similar to what it once criticized as ‘American imperialists,’” Yiong said.

He said that because of its need for oil and other raw materials, as well as for the access to the Indian Ocean, “China is providing support and weapons to authoritarian rulers in Myanmar, Sudan and Zimbabwe.”

CRACKDOWNS

“As the Chinese government cracks down on Tibetan demonstrators in Lhasa, arrests Chinese human rights activists and even allows live organ harvest of Falun Gong practitioners, we cannot pretend that all these do not happen and we only focus on economic exchanges,” Yiong said.

“If we do, we would become a member of China’s ‘axis of evil,’” he said.

Taiwan should seek to become an “exporter of democracy” and bring up human rights issues — such as urging Beijing to give justice to victims of the Tiananmen Massacre — during cross-strait talks, he told the conference.

“Taiwan received much help from the international community — especially from international human rights groups—during our struggle for democracy,” former DDP legislator Lin Cho-shui (林濁水) said.

Several Chinese democracy activists also attended the conference, which was organized by a Chinese democracy movement support group.

JUSTICE DELAYED

“We’re talking about commemorating the Tiananmen Massacre here, but it’s not just about remembering a historic event, because Tiananmen Square is not yet history,” Chinese democracy activist Xue Wei (薛偉) said.

“Justice is yet to be rendered even judged by the lowest standards, many Tiananmen Square demonstrators are still in jail or in exile,” Xue said.

“Remembering Tiananmen Square itself is a resistance to the Chinese Communist Party regime,” he said.

All the speakers expressed their concerns that less people seem to care about democracy in China today as the country evolves into a strong economic power.

“I’ve heard some people attributing China’s economic development to the iron-handed crackdown of demonstrators in Tiananmen Square,” former New Party legislator Yao Li-ming (姚立明) said. “That’s highly inappropriate.”

Yao said he was sorry that President Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九) seems to have become more ambivalent about the the massacre since he became president.

“I understand that he may have other considerations as a president who represents the entire Republic of China,” Yao said.

“But I do expect him to make a gesture on June 4,” Yao said.

The Taipei Times

Posted in Activist, Asia, Beijing, China, Dissident, Event, forum, Human Rights, June 4, News, People, Politics, Social, Special day, Taiwan, Tiananmen, World | Comments Off on Taiwan urged to export democracy to China

China cuts off dissent ahead of Tiananmen anniversary

Posted by Author on May 29, 2009


By Malcolm Moore in Shanghai, Telegraph, UK, 28 May 2009-

Beijing has taken steps to prevent dissent in response to a groundswell of pressure for the authorities to atone for what happened.

Students at Beijing and Dalian Universities have been banned from giving any interviews to the foreign media until after the anniversary.

The Public Security Bureau in Dalian warned: “Any indication of an approach from a foreign journalist must be reported immediately.”

University exams have been scheduled across China on June 4, in what appears to be an attempt to keep students inside their classrooms.

Security officers have also been targeting known dissidents including Bao Tong, 76, an aide to Zhao Zhiyang, the late Chinese leader. He has been taken out of Beijing to the mountain region of Huangshan on Monday.

Bao helped to orchestrate the release of Zhao’s secret memoirs, which revealed clashes at the top of the Communist Party over how to respond to the student protests of 1989.

“When the Communist Party thinks it needs to win the praise and trust of the Chinese people, that is when they will apologise,” he said in an interview with the Daily Telegraph. “But if they think it is not necessary to win that trust and praise, they will never apologise.”

Qi Zhiyong, who lost a leg after being shot in the suppression of the protests, said he had also been forcibly removed from Beijing but allowed to return in order to have access to medication.

“They are strengthening their surveillance over me and escorting me wherever I go,” he said.

Yu Jie, an outspoken writer, sent an email to his friends on Wednesday saying that four plain clothes policemen had been sent to monitor him. “They said they had received orders and the restraint of my personal freedom would remain after June 4,” he said, referring to the date of the anniversary.

According to Radio Free Asia, Zhang Shijun, a former soldier who took part in the armed response has been under house arrest since he published a critical open letter to Hu Jintao, the Chinese president, in March. His wife and daughter have been separated and are being monitored.

Since the beginning of the month, there have been growing calls for the government to admit a massacre took place. Wang Dun, one of the most-wanted student leaders, suggested that Chinese wore white on June 4 in memory of the dead. On Google China, the phrase “6 + 4, 20”, representing June 4, 20th anniversary, was briefly one of the most searched terms.

Yesterday (Thurs), 128 family members of Tiananmen victims issued a public statement calling for a fair and independent investigation, and the publication of the names and number of those who died. They also called for compensation and for “those responsible” to be prosecuted.

Meanwhile, popular internet forums on Baidu, China’s leading internet portal, have been closed down in Beijing and tightly restricted across the rest of China.

In Guizhou, a seminar planned for June 4 to discuss human rights has been shut down by local police, and the organisers were detained. There are dozens of other reports of house searches, including of Zha Jianguo, a founding member of the China Democratic Party. One retired professor was beaten when he tried to visit Zhao Ziyang’s tomb in Jinan.

In Shanghai, petitioners have been warned by the local police not to visit Beijing in the ten day period over June 4.

The Telegraph

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