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Archive for the ‘mine accident’ Category

(photos) 100 China reporters collect hush money for mining accident cover-up: photographer

Posted by Author on November 8, 2008


The Epochtimes, Nov 5, 2008-

Real and “fake” reporters collecting hush money (from Internet)

Real and “fake” reporters collecting hush money (from Internet)

Dai Xiaojun, a reporter from the Shanxi branch office of West Times who took pictures of real and “fake” reporters collecting hush money from the Ganhe coal mine operation in Huobao, Shanxi Province, has recently became famous for exposing the cover-up of a mining accident.

According to beijingnews.com, Ganhe Coal Mine Company tried to cover-up a mining accident that killed a coal miner on September 20. Dai Xiaojun received a tip from a friend on September 25 that the mine company was giving out money to silence reporters, and that about 100 people had lined up to collect the hush money. Dai’s friend, a senior reporter from a newspaper in Shanxi Province who did not want to expose himself, called and suggested that Dai report the story and told Dai to take a camera with him.

Reporters lineup waiting for collecting hush money

Reporters lineup waiting for collecting hush money

Dai said that he had read similar reports before.  However, he did not expect to see so many people at the scene. There were 38 people in the 4 pictures he took, and there were many who were not in the photos. The mine company claimed that only 28 people collected hush money, which means that they not only tried to cover-up the mining accident, but also the number of so called reporters who collected the hush money.

Dai sorted through the names iof those he had taken pictures of and found only two with reporter IDs issued by the General Administration of Press and Publication of the People’s Republic of China. The great majority were fake reporters.

Reporters sign-in paper

Reporters sign-in paper

Dai said that he felt a cold chill run down his spine when he took the pictures. He thought about another reporter, Lan Chengzhang, who was beaten to death while investigating an illegal coal mine in Huiyuan County in Shanxi Province. He therefore feared that the mine owner and the fake reporters would attack him.


Escape Plan

Dai said that he and his coworker had worked up an escape plan. His coworker parked the car downstairs and started the engine, and was supposed to drive off as soon as he ran downstairs. Dai should throw the camera into the car if he was caught before getting into the car, and his coworker should just leave with the camera and call the police later.

Dai said that it only took him a few seconds to take pictures of a list with names of people who had collected hush money because he acted so fast. He took a few more pictures in the stairway. Those people did not realize what happened when he went back to the car. He and his coworker first drove in the opposite direction for fear of being followed. They then turned back.

Dai uploaded the pictures on the Zhi Bo Jian website and published an article to report his findings. He said many people had questioned his motive and reliability. He thought that’s normal because he had hit a sore spot in many people. He said he did not think too much about it once he decided to report the story.

Dai said that a few years ago he read a report about a mining accident in a village in Henan Province. He saw a picture of a tall building in a newspaper with a caption saying that a local mining accident had not been reported to the authorities, and that many people collected hush money inside the building.

Dai said that the picture impressed him so much, and he was wondering why the picture could only be taken outside a building. He wondered if his camera lens could get inside the building to take more pictures of real scenes with real people collecting hush money.

Zan Aizong, formerly a Zhejiang Province reporter for China Ocean Newspaper said that giving reporters “hush money” is a common practice for industries and government officials. Some people would rather pay money to prevent something bad from being exposed to the public.

Zan said that as long asthe  General Administration of Press and Publication exists, similar incidents like “hush money,” “fake reporters and fake news reports,” “Sanlu’s tainted milk scandal cover-up,” “earthquake damages cover-up,” and so on will continue to happen. He said that if everyone is living in an environment with untrue news reporting, people will lose their ability to make good judgments and society will become worse. He said the use of hush money is unlikely to happen if non-government-run media outlets are allowed to exist.

The Epochtimes

Posted in Business, Central China, China, corruption, Economy, Incident, Journalist, Law, mine accident, News, People, Shanxi, Social, Speech, World | 3 Comments »

Two Trapped China Miners Dig to Safety After 5 Days By Eating Coal and Drinking Urine

Posted by Author on August 29, 2007


BBC News, 29 August 2007-

Two miners who escaped from a collapsed pit in Beijing ate coal and drank urine to survive, Chinese media has reported.

Brothers Meng Xianchen and Meng Xianyou told the Beijing News they became so hungry it was impossible even to crawl.

Xianchen said he found coal “quite fragrant” at first, but later it became “bitter and unsmooth”.

He described how they filled two water bottles with urine, saying: “You can only take small sips, and when you’ve finished, you just want to cry.”

Rescue efforts were halted after two days, with officials and the families of both men believing they were dead.

But the pair managed to dig their way out of the pit using just their hands, after spending more than five days under ground.

“At the end, we were so hungry we ate coal and thought it tasted delicious,” Meng Xianchen said.

‘Total breakdown’

The brothers said they had been hopeful of being rescued until the sound of digging outside stopped.

Then they “totally had a breakdown” and eventually began to use humour to help them get through the ordeal.

“I told my brother ‘your wife is going to have to marry someone else'”, Meng Xianyou told the newspaper.

His brother replied: “I laughed too. I said my wife could find a rich man in Shenyang.

“But then I thought, I have two children and my wife is ugly, so it would be hard for her to remarry.”

The men were working at an illegal mine on the outskirts of Beijing when they were trapped by a rock fall on 18 August.

“At the beginning, our mobile phone still had power so there was a little bit of light.

“Two days later, the battery ran out so we could only feel with our fingers and listen.”

Doctors said that the brothers had suffered kidney damage due to lack of water, but had no other injuries.

China’s mines are the world’s most dangerous, with about 5,000 deaths reported every year.

– Original report from BBC News : China miners ‘survived on urine’

Posted in Beijing, China, Economy, Food, Health, Incident, Life, mine accident, News, People, Social, Worker, World | Comments Off on Two Trapped China Miners Dig to Safety After 5 Days By Eating Coal and Drinking Urine

Bad News Under Control- 181 Miners Are Lost In China Flood

Posted by Author on August 20, 2007


Jane Macartney, of The Times, UK, August 20, 2007-

Beijing- Frantic relatives of 181 Chinese miners trapped by flash floods hundreds of metres underground scuffled with security forces today as they criticised rescue efforts.

More than 200 people massed at the mine entrance toppled an iron fence and broke into the compound, desperate to discover the fate of missing husbands and fathers in what threatens to become one of China’s deadliest ever mining disasters.

Li Chuanmei said her 42-year-old brother was one of the missing. “No one has said anything about what is happening. They are treating these people like they are sacrificial goods.”

An official had earlier given them little cause for hope. “I’d guess that the miners down the shaft have no hope of survival,” said the chief rescue officer, Zhu Wenyu, according to state media.

The accident was triggered when the torrential rains that have lashed swaths of China this summer breached a river levee and sent water cascading into the Zhangzhuang mine via an old shaft. More than 750 men were underground when the waters rushed in but most managed to escape. Officials said 172 were trapped.

Nine other miners were also missing after the flash floods poured into a nearby mine.

The Zhangzhuang mine, in eastern Shandong province, some 450 kilometres south of Beijing, is owned by the Huayuan Mining Co. Rescue teams, with help from the army, battled all day Saturday to close the breach in the levee.

President Hu Jintao urged rescuers to “take all necessary measures to rescue the trapped miners,” Xinhua news agency reported. However, officials at the scene held out little hope for the missing men and the absence of obvious signs of rescue activity exacerbated the distress of their families.

Li Xuehua screamed: “Save my little brother. Get him out.” Two relatives propped up the desperate woman. But stone-faced officials turned down pleas from relatives for news of the missing men.

Zhou Jun, the 19-year-old son of one trapped miner, had travelled from the coastal city of Qingdao to be close to his father. After officials could give him no news, the teenager collapsed and was taken to hospital.

Senior officials reported today that the levee had been restored. “This is the first step, which is good. Now we are preparing to pump water out of the mine before sending in rescue workers,” said Wang Dequan, a spokesman for the Taian city government. “There is a lot of water to be pumped.”

The main state television news did not mention the disaster until the end of its evening broadcast, devoting just a minute to reports of efforts to pump out the water and making no mention of how many miners were missing — a sign of the seriousness of the situation.

China prefers to limit the amount of bad news that it tells its people, and just last week ordered a new campaign to ensure that most of the news is good in the run-up to a crucial five-yearly Congress of the ruling Communist Party expected in October.

Its coal mines are the world’s deadliest, with thousands of fatalities each year in fires, floods and other disasters. Many are blamed on managers who disregard safety rules.

The Government has promised for years to improve mine safety, but the country depends on coal for most of its electric power and its economic boom has created voracious demand.

Production has more than doubled since 2000. The deadliest reported coalmine disaster since the 1949 Communist revolution was an explosion that killed 214 miners in 2005 in northeastern Liaoning province.

– Original report from The Times : Family fury as 181 miners are lost in flood

Posted in censorship, China, disaster, East China, Flood, Media, mine accident, News, People, Politics, Shandong, Social, Worker, World | Comments Off on Bad News Under Control- 181 Miners Are Lost In China Flood

8 Killed Again- at Least 13 deaths per day in China mine accidents

Posted by Author on June 24, 2007


The Times of India, 24 Jun, 2007- 

BEIJING: Eight miners were killed and one seriously injured in separate colliery accidents this week in southwest China’s Yunnan Province, media reports said on Sunday.

A gas blast occurred in a coal mine in Chuxiong city on Wednesday, leaving five dead and one seriously injured. Gas leaked on the same day in the Chinahe coal mine in Xuanwei city in eastern Yunnan, killing one miner.

Another miner was killed on Tuesday when a shaft collapsed in the Xuekong colliery in the Dali Bai Autonomous Prefecture.

A colliery worker died of the same reason in the Dachonggou coal mine of Shizong County on Monday. Yunnan province has witnessed eight coal mine accidents that killed 12 people since June 1.

Fifty-five coal mine accidents occurred in Yunnan so far this year, killing 79 miners. China is the world’s biggest coal producer and consumer.

However, Chinese mines are notorious for its spate of major accidents.

Figures from the State Administration of Work Safety, China’s safety watchdog, show that coal mine accidents killed 4,746 people in China in 2006 with an average of 13 deaths per day.

original report from  The Times of India

Posted in Asia, China, Economy, mine accident, News, People, Rural, SW China, Worker | Comments Off on 8 Killed Again- at Least 13 deaths per day in China mine accidents

1000 Unlicensed “black” Mines in 1 Province: China Shanxi

Posted by Author on June 13, 2007


Jin Ying, reporter from Democracy and Legal Times (Minzhu yu Fazhi Shibao), translated and edited by China Labour Bulletin, Hong Kong-

THE northern province of Shanxi is the centre of China’s ever expanding coal industry, and deep in the very heart of Shanxi are the mountainous rural county of Fenxi and the smoke enveloped city of Linfen, officially the most polluted place in China.

Air, land and water pollution are so bad in Fenxi and Linfen that local clinics have seen a dramatic rise in cases of bronchitis, pneumonia and lung cancer over the last decade. And with the privatisation of China’s health system, this has placed an intolerable financial as well as medical burden on the region’s already impoverished population. Very often the only way the people of Fenxi and Linfen can pay their family medical bills is by working in the very industry responsible for the environmental degradation and pollution all around them. With an ample supply of labour, the county has seen a rapid growth in the coal mining industry, especially small unlicensed mines producing poor quality, highly polluting coal in hazardous and all too often life-threatening conditions. There are nearly a thousand unlicensed mines in Fenxi, which, despite numerous clampdowns, continue to operate covertly with the connivance of local officials.

In April, 2007, Jin Ying, a reporter from Democracy and Legal Times (Minzhu yu Fazhi Shibao), investigated the operation of illegal mines in Fenxi, known locally as “black mines,” and exposed an elaborate network of official corruption and collusion that creates lethal working conditions for miners.

His report, translated and edited here, is important not only because of the story about the mining industry it tells but because it demonstrates the determination of many journalists in China today to report the ugly truth, even at considerable risk to their own safety.

Shanxi Province’s 1,000 unlicensed mines:
Owners collude with officials over “black” pits

There are nearly a thousand unlicensed coal mines operating in Fenxi County. These “black” pits are the result of years of unbridled expansion, defying repeated banning orders, with new mines opening after every batch of closures.

One of the many local labourers attracted to this illegal industry was named Liu Wei. In mid-March this year, Liu was working in a “black” pit in Fenxi County‘s Dianping village. He was crushed to death when the underground roof of the mineshaft he was working in collapsed.

Because he was working in a “black” pit, Liu’s death was completely ignored by officialdom until Liu’s brother, in desperation, turned to the legal support centre of the Judicial Bureau of Ziyang County. From late March to early April, Yang Pei of the legal support centre repeatedly took members of Liu’s family to Dianping village to seek a settlement.

Finally, with three mine accidents in Linfen this March alone, and a province-wide campaign underway to clean up local mining and end unsafe and uncontrolled extraction, local officials and police launched an investigation. After many setbacks and delays, on April 10, Liu’s family were paid RMB 250,000 in compensation.

In Fenxi County, the local view is that Liu was lucky: his death generated a hefty compensation payment. With nearly 1,000 “black” mines in the area, they say there is no way of knowing who might have died underground, adding that many accident victims get no compensation at all.

In the town of Heping, a former “black” mine boss, who we shall call Yiming (One Light) told Democracy and Legal Times; “Believe it or not, we have over a hundred black mines in this one town here, and the whole county has a thousand. I heard personally from Deputy Mayor Ma, that Heping has altogether 167 unauthorised mines. In fact, it’s a lot more than that. My understanding is that the real number is at least 200.” ( …… for more details click here)

Posted in air, Businessman, Central China, China, Company, corruption, Economy, Environment, Law, Life, mine accident, News, Official, People, Report, Rural, Social, water, Worker | 1 Comment »

China Mining Accidents Cause 13 Deaths Per Day in 2006

Posted by Author on April 15, 2007


The China Scope, 4/13/2007-

According to the Chinese State Administration of Work Safety, recent accidents in the Wangjiasai Coal Mine and the Baijiao Coal mine (two major national coal mines in Guizhou and Sichuan respectively) have resulted in fourteen deaths.

On March 27, 2007, inadequate safety measures resulted in an explosion at the Wangjiasai Coal Mine, and a similar accident took place on April 1, 2007, at the Baijiao Coal Mine.

According to the State Administration of Work Safety, these two incidents reveal troubling issues related to the safety, work and mining conditions of the nation’s state-owned mines.

Moreover, a total of 2,845 mining accidents were reported in 2006, resulting in 4,746 deaths, or an average of 13 deaths per day.

– original report from The China Scope report: Government Reveals 2,845 Mining Accidents Reported In 2006

Posted in China, Economy, Guizhou, Law, Life, mine accident, News, People, Rural, Sichuan, Social, SW China, Worker | Comments Off on China Mining Accidents Cause 13 Deaths Per Day in 2006

China mine accident again, 20 died, 9 missing

Posted by Author on March 10, 2007


While the news of 15 miners killed in a Chinese coal mine accident happened 3 days ago ( on March 8)  is still fresh in mind, today’s news shows there are another 20 miners killed in a new accident. Here’s the report from Reuters:

BEIJING, March 11 (Reuters) – A flood in a colliery in northeastern China has killed 20 miners and 9 are missing, the Xinhua news agency said on Sunday.

The accident happened on Saturday evening at a mine in Liaoning province run by state-owned Fushun Mining Group, Xinhua quoted the local government as saying.

China has the world’s deadliest coal industry.

Last year, 4,746 workers were killed in mine blasts, floods and collapses as collieries pushed production beyond safety limits to meet buoyant demand.

Posted in China, Economy, Life, mine accident, News, People, Rural, Social, Worker | 1 Comment »

China Mine Blast Kills 15

Posted by Author on March 8, 2007


Reuters, 08 Mar 2007-

BEIJING, March 8 (Reuters) – An explosion in a Chinese coal mine killed 15 miners, with investigators blaming faulty equipment for the country’s latest addition to a grim record of industrial carnage, state media media reported.

The blast ripped through the mine in Shaodong county in south China’s Hunan province on Tuesday after a build-up of gas, Xinhua news agency reported.

By late on Wednesday, rescuers had found the remains of 15 dead miners. Seventeen miners survived, Xinhua reported. They were mostly local farmers. “Damaged ventilation shafts and illegal electrical systems were believed to be the cause of the accident,” Xinhua reported late on Wednesday, quoting officials.

The mine had been ordered to stop production last August, and lacked an operating licence and safety permit.

China has the world’s deadliest major coal industry, and while mine deaths have been falling after a safety crackdown, accidents like the latest explosion remain commonplace.

Last year, 4,746 workers were killed in mine blasts, floods and collapses as collieries pushed production beyond safety limits amid buoyant demand.

Police have arrested two of the mine owners and were hunting its general manager, Xinhua said.

China plans to this year shut 4,000 inefficient and dangerous coal mines with combined annual capacity of about 100 million tonnes, the head of the State Administration of Work Safety said this week.

“We will shut more dangerous and polluting coal mines this year according to government regulations,” Li Yizhong told reporters on the sidelines of China’s annual parliament session.

 – original report

Posted in China, Economy, Law, mine accident, News, People, Rural, Social, Worker | Comments Off on China Mine Blast Kills 15

China Police Deny Reporter’s Beaten to Death as a Press Freedom Violation

Posted by Author on January 22, 2007


Reporters Without Borders, 22 January 2007-

The owner of the mine where The China Trade News employee Lan Chenzhang was fatally beaten on 10 January surrendered to the authorities on 19 January after a police manhunt. The mine-owner, Hou Zhenrun, is alleged to have told eight men to attack Lan with iron bars and other improvised weapons.

There is still considerable uncertainty about the motives of Lan and his colleague Chang Hanwen for going to the mine. The police maintain that they did not go there to write about the working conditions of its miners but to extort the equivalent of 130 US dollars from the owner in return for their silence.

Despite an outcry about the case, The China Trade News and other state media refuse to regard Lan’s death as a press freedom violation, arguing that he was just a ordinary employee of the newspaper and not a journalist.

———
Related:  China Mine Probe Reporter Killed, BBC News

Posted in China, Economy, Human Rights, Journalist, Law, Media, mine accident, News, People, Politics, Social, Speech | Comments Off on China Police Deny Reporter’s Beaten to Death as a Press Freedom Violation

China Mine Probe Reporter Killed

Posted by Author on January 16, 2007


BBC News, 16 January 2007-

A Chinese journalist has been beaten to death while investigating the country’s notoriously dangerous coal mining industry, his newspaper has said.

Lan Chengzhang was set upon by a “group of mining thugs” near a mine in Huiyuan county, Shanxi province, the Beijing-based China Trade News said.

Another newspaper quoted a journalist with Mr Lan as saying the attack had been ordered by a local coal mine boss.

China’s coal mines are among the most dangerous in the world.

More than 5,000 deaths are reported every year, many of them in illegal or unregulated mines.

Lan Chengzhang had only just started at the newspaper and was still in his trial period when he was killed, the China Trade News’ head of news Wang Jianfeng said.

Mr Wang said the newspaper had sent a team to investigate the killing and had made official complaints to the local police and government.

“We will do everything we can to protect the rights of journalists,” he told the AFP news agency.

Search for profits

Mr Lan had been investigating the story with a fellow journalist, another newspaper, the Southern Daily, reported.

The surviving journalist accused an unnamed boss of a coal mine in Huiyuan of orchestrating the beating.

He said he had been detained in the boss’s office while the attack was carried out, the newspaper said.

Beijing has pledged to take action to improve the mining industry, which is blighted by poor safety procedures and a lack of proper equipment.

Mine owners are accused of frequently ignoring government regulations in search of greater profits.

Coal provides more than two-thirds of China’s electricity.

original report 

Posted in China, Economy, Human Rights, Journalist, Law, mine accident, News, People, Social, Speech | Comments Off on China Mine Probe Reporter Killed

All 47 Trapped Coal Miners Die in North China

Posted by Author on November 16, 2006


Reuters, Nov 16, 2006-

BEIJING, Nov 16 (Reuters) – All 34 coal miners trapped underground on Sunday in north China after explosives caught fire have been confirmed dead, state media said on Thursday, bringing the death toll from two recent accidents to 81. The miners suffocated after more than four tons of illegally stored explosives caught fire, generating toxic gas, at the Nanshan Colliery in Shanxi province, where a quarter of China’s coal is produced.

All 47 miners trapped by a Nov. 5 gas blast at the Jiaojiazhai coal mine, also in Shanxi, had been confirmed dead with one last body found on Thursday, Xinhua news agency said.

The almost daily series of accidents highlights China’s uphill battle to clean up its mining industry while struggling to meet booming demand and high prices for coal, which fuels about 70 percent of its energy consumption.

In the rush for profits, safety regulations are often ignored, production is pushed beyond limits and dangerous mines that have been shut down are reopened illegally.

Zhao Tiechui, head of China’s coal mine safety watchdog, criticised local officials for lax supervision of the village-run Nanshan Colliery, whose licences had expired nearly a year ago and whose owner and managers had fled the scene. He warned officials across the country against allowing closed mines to restart production, the Beijing News said.

Many grassroots officials have secretly flouted orders to close mines as they don’t want to lose tax revenue and, in some cases, dividends from their own stakes in the mines.

On Wednesday, the New York-based group, Human Rights in China (HRIC), urged China to examine the case of a private mine owner in the southwestern province of Guizhou whose colliery, it said, was taken away from him after he refused to give free dividends to local officials. ”

HRIC also urges the Chinese authorities to undertake a comprehensive review of official abuse of power and corruption that has contributed to life-threatening conditions in mine operations nationwide,” it said in a faxed statement.

Despite a 22 percent decline in fatalities from a year earlier, a total of 3,726 miners died in over 2,300 floods, blasts and other accidents in the world’s deadliest coal mining industry in the first 10 months of 2006.

Posted in China, Economy, Law, Life, mine accident, News, North China, People, Rural, Social, Worker | Comments Off on All 47 Trapped Coal Miners Die in North China

Death toll climbs to 23 in China mine disasters

Posted by Author on November 13, 2006


Reuters

BEIJING, Nov 12 (Reuters) – Accidents at two Chinese coal mines have killed at least seven workers as the death toll from a gas explosion at a third mine a week ago rose to 23, the official Xinhua news agency said.

In the latest disaster to hit the coal-dependent nation, two miners were killed on Friday after the wagon in which they were travelling broke free from a steel cord in the Xinchun mine in Jilin province in the northeast, Xinhua said.

The news came as the toll from an explosion on Wednesday at the privately owned Xinpo mine in the central province of Hunan rose to five, with at least 12 still unaccounted for, it said. Both the chief and deputy head of that mine had fled the scene.

Meanwhile, hopes had all but faded for 24 workers missing at the mine in the northern province of Shanxi, where Xinhua said 23 miners were now known to have died in a gas blast a week ago.

China, which relies on coal to fuel around 70 percent of its energy consumption, has the world’s deadliest mining industry.

Safety regulations are often flouted as production is pushed beyond its limits in the name of profit.

A task force set up by the State Council, or cabinet, on Friday to investigate the cause of the Shanxi accident had criticised poor management and a disregard of safety norms at the mine, Xinhua said.

The mishap was “rooted (in) production safety ignorance and a chaotic management of the mine owner,” Xinhua quoted Li Yizhong, chief of China’s work safety authority, as saying.

Xinhua said the Xinchun mine in Jilin had flouted recent government orders to halt production until proper safety checks had been carried out.

Accidents in China’s coal mines killed 345 miners in October, nearly 50 percent more than in the previous month, despite years of government pledges to improve standards.

Between January and October, around 3,630 Chinese miners died in more than 2,000 accidents.

Posted in China, Economy, Health, Life, mine accident, NE China, News, People, Social, Worker | Comments Off on Death toll climbs to 23 in China mine disasters

19 miners killed and 28 others trapped after coal mine blast

Posted by Author on November 7, 2006


China Labour Bulletin, 7 November 2006-

Nineteen miners were killed and 28 others were trapped after a coal mine explosion in Shanxi Province.

The gas explosion occurred at the state-owned Jiaojiazhai Coal Mine in Xinzhou on 5 November. According to the rescue headquarters, 393 workers were working in the mine when the blast took place, and 346 miners escaped. As of 7 November, 19 miners were killed and 28 others were still trapped inside the mine.

Shanxi Governor Yu Youjun blamed the accidents for mine operators not following safety regulations. “Based on our preliminary analysis, this accident happened because [the mine] did not follow safety procedures in production. This is a big lesson for us,” he said.

A coal miner told China Labour Bulletin that armed police blocked the site after the coal mine explosion. Most of the miners at Jiaojiazhai were rural migrant workers. A trade union official of the mine said the union gathered the victims’ families at the mine’s guesthouse to “avoid anyone making any troubles”.

Wang Xianzheng, a vice-director of the State Administration of Work Safety, told Xinhua on 6 November that 345 miners were killed in 174 mine accidents in October. The number of deaths has increased by 44.4 percent comparing with that of September and the number of fatal accidents was up 26.1 percent.

Meanwhile, another mine accident on 4 November in Jilin Province that killed seven people was caused by miners smoking underground, according to Xinhua. Investigators found cigarette butts at the site in the Nanyang Hongyuan Coal Mine in Fudong.

Sources: Xinhua News Agency (7 November 2006), South China Morning Post (7 November 2006), China Labour Bulletin

Original report from China Labour Bulletin

Posted in China, Economy, Law, Life, mine accident, News, People, Rural, Social, Worker | Comments Off on 19 miners killed and 28 others trapped after coal mine blast

Gas blast kills 29 coal miners in northwest China

Posted by Author on October 31, 2006


BEIJING, Oct 31 (Reuters) – A gas explosion at a coal mine in northwest China on Tuesday killed 29 miners and injured 19, Xinhua news agency said, in the latest accident to hit the world’s deadliest mining industry.

The blast occurred just after noon at the Weijiadi coal mine in Baiyin city in Gansu, an underdeveloped province containing part of the Gobi Desert, Xinhua said.

Seventy-one miners were working underground at the time of the explosion and 36 escaped immediately after the blast, 13 of whom were among the injured, Xinhua said.

It had previously quoted Wang Jun, general manager of the Jingyuan Coal Industry Corporation, the mine’s operator, as saying 39 miners had been working in the mine, with four escaping unhurt.

China is struggling to meet booming demand for coal, which fuels about 70 percent of its energy consumption.

In the rush for profits, safety regulations are often ignored, production is pushed beyond limits and dangerous mines that have been shut down are reopened illegally.

Last year, 3,300 coal mine blasts, floods and other accidents killed nearly 6,000 people, according to official figures.

Despite a 23 percent decline in the death toll for the first nine months of 2006 compared with the year-ago period, 3,284 coal miners have died in more than 2,000 accidents through September.

Posted in China, Economy, Life, mine accident, News, People, Rural, Social, Worker | Comments Off on Gas blast kills 29 coal miners in northwest China

Gas explosion kills 11 Chinese miners

Posted by Author on October 26, 2006


Reuters, 26 Oct 2006-

BEIJING, Oct 26 (Reuters) – A gas explosion has killed 11 miners at a coal mine in the northeastern Chinese province of Jilin, the official Xinhua news agency said on Thursday.

The blast happened in the early hours of Thursday morning at the Xinyu mine near Baishan city, trapping the 11 who were working underground, it said.

Rescuers found their bodies five hours later, Xinhua added.

China is struggling to meet booming demand for coal, which fuels about 70 percent of its energy consumption. In the rush for profits, safety regulations are often ignored, production is pushed beyond limits and dangerous mines that have been shut down are reopened illegally.

Last year, 3,300 coal mine blasts, floods and other accidents killed nearly 6,000 people, according to official figures.

Posted in China, Economy, Life, mine accident, News, People, Rural, Social, Worker | Comments Off on Gas explosion kills 11 Chinese miners

China coal mine fire kills 10, one missing

Posted by Author on October 16, 2006


Reuters, 16 Oct 2006-

BEIJING, Oct 16 (Reuters) – Ten miners died and one was missing after fire blazed through a coal mine in northern China, state media reported on Monday, adding to the country’s unrelenting toll of industrial fatalities.

The fire broke out at about midday in the mine near Handan, a small city in Hebei province.

By late in the evening, 52 miners had been safely lifted from the mine shaft, and rescuers were searching for the missing worker, Xinhua news agency reported.

China is struggling to meet booming demand for coal which fuels about 70 percent of its energy consumption.

In the rush for profits, safety regulations are often ignored, production is pushed beyond limits and dangerous mines that have been shut down are reopened illegally.

Last year, 3,300 coal mine blasts, floods and other accidents killed nearly 6,000 people, according to official figures.

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Chinese coal mine explosion kills 13

Posted by Author on October 7, 2006


dpa German Press Agency, October 6, 2006-

Beijing- At least 13 people died and seven were injured Friday in China after gas exploded underground at a coal mine in the south-western province of Sichuan, the government said. The explosion ripped through the Furong Coal Mine in Yibin city just after 3 a.m. (1900 GMT Thursday), the State Administration of Work Safety said on its website.

The 13 bodies were recovered and seven injured miners were sent to hospital for emergency treatment, the administration said.

The report did not say how many miners were working at the time of the accident, but it said the rescue operation had ended.

The licensed mine had a designed annual capacity of 1.2 million tons, it said.

Nine miners and one rescue worker were missing after another gas explosion Thursday in north-eastern China’s Liaoning province, state media said.

Rescue efforts continued Friday to find 10 people missing at the Baoxing mine in Liaoning’s Fangzheng county, the China News Service said.

Nineteen of the 28 miners working underground managed to reach the surface after the explosion, the agency said.

About 6,000 coal miners were killed in accidents in China last year, according to official figures.

Out-of-date equipment, illegal mining as well as poor safety systems and supervision are behind many accidents.

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