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    1. A China More Just, Gao Zhisheng
    2.Officially Sanctioned Crime in China, He Qinglian
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    Will the Boat Sink the Water? Chen Guidi, Wu Chuntao
    4.
    Losing the New China, Ethan Gutmann
    5.
    Nine Commentaries on The Communist Party, the Epochtimes
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    Reporters Without Borders said in it’s 2005 special report titled “Xinhua: the world’s biggest propaganda agency”, that “Xinhua remains the voice of the sole party”, “particularly during the SARS epidemic, Xinhua has for last few months been putting out news reports embarrassing to the government, but they are designed to fool the international community, since they are not published in Chinese.”
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Archive for the ‘Li Hong’ Category

Renowned Dissident Writer Li Hong Dies, Chinese Authorities Prevent Funeral

Posted by Author on January 5, 2011


Founding editor of the popular Zhejiang News and former chief-editor of the Chinese literary and news website Aegean Sea (Aiqinhai), Li Hong, died on Dec. 31. He was in his hospital bed, surrounded by domestic security police.

Chinese authorities sealed off news of his death and stopped dissidents and human rights activists from attending the funeral.

Li Hong, renowned for his poetry, plays, and freelance writing, was born Zhang Jianhong. He died at age 52 in Ningbo, Zhejiang Province, according to Chinese Human Rights Defenders, an NGO. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, Journalist, Li Hong, News, People, Politics, Social, World, writer | Comments Off on Renowned Dissident Writer Li Hong Dies, Chinese Authorities Prevent Funeral

Two Imprisoned Chinese Democracy Activists Gravely Ill, Require Immediate Medical Parole

Posted by Author on May 6, 2010


Human Rights in China (HRIC) has learned that political prisoners Zhang Jianhong (张建红) (also known by his pen name, Li Hong [力虹]) and Yang Tianshui (杨天水) are in extremely critical medical condition.

HRIC urges the prison authorities where Zhang and Yang are respectively held, in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, and Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, to grant immediate medical parole to the prisoners on humanitarian grounds so that they may receive the proper care that they desperately require. HRIC also appeals to the international community to closely monitor the prisoners’ conditions and join the call for their release.

Zhang Jianhong (张建红), a.k.a. Li Hong (力虹)

Zhang is a 52-year-old writer and poet who has authored a number of essays calling for democratic reform. For his role in the 1989 Democracy Movement, Zhang served 18 months of Reeducation-Through-Labor for engaging in “counter-revolutionary propaganda.” More recently, on September 4, 2006, Zhang authored “Olympicgate,” an article criticizing the government’s human rights record in advance of the 2008 Beijing Olympics [《活摘门方兴未艾,“奥运门”又将开启》]. As a result, on March 19, 2007, Zhang was convicted of “inciting subversion of state power” and sentenced to six years in prison and an additional two years of deprivation of political rights. He is currently being held at the General Prison Hospital of Zhejiang Province in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, and is scheduled for release on September 5, 2012.

Zhang suffers from advanced-stage muscular dystrophy and his condition has rapidly deteriorated over the past several months. Although the prison doctor who diagnosed Zhang stated that his illness was serious enough to qualify for medical parole, a full four months passed before Zhang was sent to the prison hospital for treatment. Officials have rejected repeated requests for medical parole by Zhang’s family and have refused to grant permission to seek treatment outside of prison facilities.

According to a May 3, 2010, report by China Free Press (Canyu), Zhang’s daughter said that when she saw her father on April 25, during the latest monthly family visit, he could no longer take food by mouth and was being sustained through intravenous feeding. He was no longer able to get up from the hospital bed and could barely talk. She said that Zhang only spoke a few sentences, mainly about what the family should do after his death. Zhang’s daughter said that the family wishes to have Zhang undergo a thorough medical evaluation outside the prison system in order to determine whether treatments are still an option, and if not, to at least provide comfort to him at home and be with him during his last days.

Yang Tianshui (杨天水)

Yang, 48, is a prolific author of essays and articles calling for democratic reform and accountability for human rights abuses. Yang previously served a ten-year prison sentence for organizing “counter-revolutionary activities” related to his involvement in the 1989 Democracy Movement. From 2002 to 2005, Yang published a number of essays on overseas Internet websites, for which he was detained, arrested, and on May 17, 2006, convicted of “subversion of state power.” Yang was then sentenced to 12 years in prison and an additional four years of deprivation of political rights. He is currently serving his sentence at Nanjing Prison in Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, and is scheduled for release on December 22, 2017. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Activist, China, Dissident, Human Rights, Li Hong, News, People, Politics, World | Comments Off on Two Imprisoned Chinese Democracy Activists Gravely Ill, Require Immediate Medical Parole

International Rights Group Call For Immediate Release of China Cyber-dissident Li Hong

Posted by Author on January 19, 2008


Reporters Without Borders, 17.01.2008-

Reporters Without Borders today repeated its appeal for the release of cyber-dissident Zhang Jianhong, pen-name Li Hong, so he can be taken to hospital and treated appropriately for his illness.

The Chinese authorities on 2 January 2008 rejected the cyber-dissident’s second request for his release. “The Chinese authorities have for more than seven months remained unmoved by the request from Li Hong to be allowed to get treatment in hospital,” the worldwide press freedom organisation said.

He is suffering from muscular dystrophy and his health has been seriously deteriorating since August 2007. He is in danger of being left paralysed. Prison authorities at Zhejiang jail told his wife, Dong Min, in a letter that Li Hong, “is receiving appropriate treatment in the prison hospital”.

Li was sentenced on 19 March 2007 to six years in prison by a court in Ningpo, Zhejiang province in south-eastern China after he was convicted of writing “articles defaming the Chinese government and calling for agitation to overthrow the government”. He in 2005 founded the literary website Aiqinhai.org and regularly posted articles on the Weilai Zhongguo forum and on foreign-based Chinese websites. The release of a sick prisoner depends on his pathology, the treatment he should receive and an assessment of the situation by prison officials. They have said they will not undertake a further medical examination as Dong Min had asked.

Li’s lawyer, Li Jianqiang received a letter in June 2007 in which his client described his state of health: “My illness is extremely rare. There is currently no effective medication or treatment. My health has worsened this last month and my muscles are atrophying. I can hardly move my arms any more and this will extend to my legs. If it goes on, I will suffer the terrible experience of being completely paralysed like the British physicist, Stephen Hawking”.

Original report from Reporters Without Borders

Posted in Blogger, China, East China, Freedom of Speech, Health, Human Rights, Journalist, Law, Li Hong, Life, News, People, Politics, Social, Speech, World, writer, Zhejiang | Comments Off on International Rights Group Call For Immediate Release of China Cyber-dissident Li Hong

CPJ Calls For Release of Ailing Imprisoned Chinese Writer Li Hong

Posted by Author on August 21, 2007


The Committee to Protect for Journalists (CPJ), New York, August 16, 2007-

New York, August 16, 2007— CPJ sent a letter today to Chinese President Hu Jintao about the deteriorating health of writer Zhang Jianhong, calling for his immediate and unconditional release on humanitarian grounds.

August 16, 2007

His Excellency Hu Jintao
President, People’s Republic of China
C/o Embassy of the People’s Republic of China
2300 Connecticut Ave.,
NW Washington, D.C. 20008

Via facsimile: (202) 588-0032

Dear President Hu:

The Committee to Protect for Journalists (CPJ) is deeply concerned about the deteriorating health of writer Zhang Jianhong and calls for his immediate and unconditional release on humanitarian grounds. Zhang has been diagnosed with a rare nerve disorder that could lead to permanent paralysis if left untreated. His numerous appeals to judicial authorities in Zhejiang province seeking release on medical parole have been ignored, according to both his wife and lawyer.

Zhang, also known by his pen name, Li Hong, was arrested on September 6, 2006, just days after posting an essay online about China’s human rights record and, in particular, the poor treatment of journalists and their sources in the run-up to the 2008 Olympic games.

In March 2007, the Ningbo Intermediate People’s Court, in the eastern province of Zhejiang, convicted him of “inciting subversion of state authority” and sentenced him to a six-year jail term followed by one year’s deprivation of political rights.

Zhang, founding editor of the popular news and literary Web site Aiqinhai (“Aegean Sea”) and a contributor to numerous other Chinese-language Web sites published from overseas, was accused of writing 60 articles that “slandered the government and China’s social system to vent his discontent with the government.”

Zhang was diagnosed on May 30 with a rare nerve disorder affecting his upper extremities, according to a letter he sent to his lawyer. Zhang wrote that the condition had deteriorated since being incarcerated. “The muscles of both my arms have seriously shrunk. As a result, they have lost the ability to function (even worse for the right hand),” he wrote, as translated by the Epoch Times Web site. “The symptoms are also spreading to my legs. They feel numb and weak, as if stepping on cotton. If this continues, I fear I will soon have to face the cruel situation of being completely paralyzed…”

Zhang’s lawyer, Li Jianqiang, told CPJ that he received the letter on August 3, though it was dated June 11. It was the last time he heard from his client.

Zhang’s wife, Dong Min, told CPJ that she has been barred from contacting her husband since June 26, when he was transferred from the Chenghu Prison, in Huzhou City, Zhejiang, to a detention center in Ningbo, also in Zhejiang province. Zhang is believed to be held currently at the Ningbo detention center, however neither his wife nor his lawyer have been able to visit or speak to him there.

As an international organization of journalists dedicated to the defense of our colleagues around the world, CPJ requests that you to use your good offices to ensure Zhang’s immediate release on humanitarian grounds. We respectfully remind you that your government is responsible for his welfare and must ensure that he receives the urgent medical attention he requires.

CPJ believes that Zhang should never have been jailed in the first place, as the use of national security charges to inhibit the peaceful expression of political views contravenes the international standards set forth by the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which China has signed but not yet ratified. Your government signed the Covenant in October 1998, less than two months before Beijing announced its plan to bid for the 2008 Olympic Games, in an apparent attempt to address international concerns about China’s human rights record.

Article 19 of the Covenant guarantees all people the right to freedom of expression, including “freedom to seek, receive, and impart information and ideas of all kinds, regardless of frontiers.” Yet China persists in its attempts to restrict the free flow of information and ideas, through outright censorship, bureaucratic media restrictions, and by jailing journalists perceived as critics of the government.

On August 15, official news outlets announced a new campaign to tighten control over the domestic media, ostensibly aimed at “false news reports, unauthorized publications, and bogus journalists” but actually casting a much wider net, including “newspapers and magazines illegally published in China using overseas registration … newspapers and magazines imported from overseas without authorization, illegal foreign language newspapers aimed at foreigners living in China, illegal political newspapers and magazines that fabricate political rumors … and illegal military newspapers and magazines that leak state secrets,” according to Liu Binjie, director of the General Administration of Press and Publication, as reported by The Associated Press.

China also holds the world record as the leading jailer of journalists, with 29 currently imprisoned, according to CPJ research. This dubious distinction does great damage to China’s reputation as the country seeks to improve its image one year before the Beijing Olympics.

CPJ calls for the release of all journalists currently imprisoned in China. Freeing Zhang on humanitarian grounds would be a first step toward improving China’s record at this critical juncture.

Thank you for your attention to this urgent matter. We await your response.

Sincerely,

Joel Simon
Executive Director

Original report from CPJ

Related:
Muscles Shrinking, Jailed Chinese Writer Asks For International Help, Aug 08, 2007

Posted in censorship, China, East China, Freedom of Speech, Hangzhou, Health, Human Rights, Internet, Journalist, Law, Li Hong, Media, News, People, Politics, Report, website, World, Zhejiang | Comments Off on CPJ Calls For Release of Ailing Imprisoned Chinese Writer Li Hong

Muscles Shrinking, Jailed Chinese Writer Asks For International Help

Posted by Author on August 9, 2007


By Xin Fei, Epoch Times Staff, Aug 08, 2007-Li Hong

Li Hong, a Chinese writer who is currently in prison for writing articles critical of the CCP, is seeking international aid in his quest for medical parole due to his worsening health.

On May 30, Li Hong received a complete physical exam and was diagnosed with nerve damage, which has since led to muscle atrophy. However his appeals for medical parole have this far been ignored.

Li Hong eventually wrote to his lawyer, Mr. Li Jianqiang, describing his situation.

Li Hong’s letter was written on June 11, but it did not reach the attorney till August 3.

In an interview with The Epoch Times on August 3, Mr. Li Jianqiang and Li Hong’s family members appealed to the international community for support and assistance to save Li Hong.

Li Jianqiang indicated that the only hope for Li Hong to be released on medical parole lies in public outcry and public pressure. He pointed out that the Chinese communist regime would not consider issues from a humanitarian point of view. Only when the international community builds up enough pressure on the Chinese authorities could there be hope of Li Hong to get released on bail to get proper medical treatment.

Li Hong wrote in his letter that on May 31 he was taken to the Chenghu prison in Zhejiang’s Huzhou City. On May 30, the Ningbo Detention Center sent him to Ningbo First Hospital for a thorough physical exam. The results showed that he had suffered nerve injury of the upper extremities.

Li Hong said in the letter, “This illness is very rare. No cure has been found so far … In the past month, especially during the first dozen days since I was sent to prison, the condition has gotten worse. The muscles on both of my arms have seriously shrunk. As a result they have lost the ability to function (even worse for the right hand). The symptoms are also spreading to my legs. They feel numb and weak, as if stepping on cotton. If this continues, I fear I will soon have to face the cruel situation of being complete paralyzed…”

At the end of the letter Li Hong said “I’m writing to you, my lawyer, about my illness in the hope that you can present this to the Zhejiang provincial judicial department, and make all efforts to earn me a medical parole. The disease symptoms spread like wildfire. The earlier my medical parole is obtained the greater the hope there is in recovery!”

Li Jianqiang told the reporter that Li Hong, his family and he himself have all applied many times to get Li Hong released on medical parole, but to no avail. The fact that the prison sent Li Hong back to the Detention Center indicates that Li Hong’s condition is indeed critical, as the prison most probably made this transfer out of fear of responsibility for his paralysis or even death.

Li Hong’s wife, Dong Min, said that ever since Li Hong was taken back to the Ningbo Detention Center on June 26, she has not been allowed to visit him. The detention center has not allowed Dong Min to send her husband daily necessities. The detention center forbids visiting and mail communication, and does not allow any nutritious products for the prisoners.

The last time Dong Min was allowed to visit her husband was on June 6. The couple talked through a glass window. She noticed her husband was very thin, and was too weak to stand stable. Li Hong told his wife that his condition was getting worse and worse. His muscles were withering, his whole body was weak, and he couldn’t take care of himself. His health had steadily deteriorated. If this went on, he would be paralyzed. He feared the illness would affect his heart, and endanger his life, if he did not receive prompt medical treatment.

Background:

Li Hong is the pen name of Zhang Jianhong. Li (Zhang) participated in the student pro-democratic movement in 1989, and was sentenced to two years in a labor camp under the crime of “counter-revolutionary incitement during the June 4 movement (when the Chinese communist regime perpetrated the Tiananmen Square Massacre).”

In recent years Li Hong has published articles criticizing the communist regime. He and his friends jointly established the Aegean Sea website, which is known for daring to publish facts regarding the Party and the true situation inside China. On March 9, 2006, the website was shut down by the Zhejiang provincial news office and communication administration.

On September 6, 2006, Li Hong was taken from his home by the police.

On November 12 the local authorities officially arrested him for “instigating the subversion of the political power of the state.”

On January 12, 2007, the local authorities secretly held a hearing in the Ningbo Intermediate Court, convicting him of the same crime.

On March 19, Li Hong was sentenced to six years in prison. Li Hong submitted his appeal at the court. However, on May 21, the Zhejiang Provincial Superior Court rejected his appeal and sustained the original judgment.

– Original report from the Epochtimes : Jailed Chinese Writer Asks for Medical Parole

Posted in China, East China, Freedom of Speech, Health, Human Rights, Journalist, Law, Li Hong, Life, medical, News, People, Politics, Social, World, writer, Zhejiang | Comments Off on Muscles Shrinking, Jailed Chinese Writer Asks For International Help

China Cyber-dissident Gets 6 Years in Prison For Views His Express

Posted by Author on March 19, 2007


Reporters Without Borders, 19 March 2007-

Reporters Without Borders voiced dismay on learning that cyber-dissident Zhang Jianhong, who is also known by the pen-name of Li Hong, was sentenced today to six years in prison by a court in Ningbo, in the eastern province of Zhejiang. He has appealed against the sentence.

A member of the Chinese branch of the independent writers association PEN, Zhang was arrested in September 2006 and was charged the following month with “incitement to subvert the state’s authority” for calling for political reform in articles posted on the Internet. Two other cyber-dissidents who were arrested six months ago, Chen Shuqing and Yang Maodong, are still awaiting trial.

“This verdict is sadly yet another example of the judicial system being used by the political authorities,” Reporters Without Borders said. “It is outrageous that cyber-dissidents get severe prison sentences just for the views they express. Yet again, they are being made to pay a heavy price for their commitment. After Zhang’s conviction, we fear that the same fate is in store for Chen and Yang.”

According to the New China news agency, Zhang was convicted of writing “articles defaming the Chinese government and calling for agitation to overthrow the government.” The court said it was showing clemency to the defendant, who posted around 100 articles on the Internet from May to September 2006, because he expressed remorse during the trial.

Aged 48, Zhang founded the literary website Aiqinhai.org in August 2005 and was its editor until the authorities shut it down in March 2006. He also wrote regularly for sites such as Boxun and The Epoch Times. He already spent a year and a half in a reeducation-through-work camp for “counter-revolutionary propaganda” after getting involved in the 1989 pro-democracy movement.

Chen’s case has been sent back to the police for further investigation. A member of the banned China Democracy Party (CDP), he was charged on 17 October 2006 with “incitement to subvert the state’s authority.” He was already detained for four months in 1999 for helping to create the CDP.

Better known as Guo Feixiong, Yang was arrested on 14 September 2006. A lawyer, writer and human rights activist, he has been accused of “illegal business activity.” He was previously arrested for “disturbing the peace” after a rally on 13 September 2005 in the village of Taishi (in Guangdong province).

original report from Reporters Without Borders

Related:
Writers in Prison: China’s Crackdown on Dissident Writers, Writers in Prison Committee of International PEN, 10th October, 2006

Posted in China, East China, Human Rights, Internet, Journalist, Law, Li Hong, News, People, Politics, Social, Speech, website, World | 2 Comments »

Writers in Prison: China’s Crackdown on Dissident Writers

Posted by Author on October 12, 2006


Cathy McCann, Writers in Prison Committee of International PEN, 10th October, 2006-

The Writers in Prison Committee of International PEN is alarmed about an apparent crackdown on dissident writers in China. Three writers have been detained in recent weeks: they are Zhang Jianhong (aka Li Hong), Yang Maodong (aka Guo Feixiong) and Chen Shuqing. All three appear to be held for their critical writings and dissident activities. There are serious concerns that they are at risk of ill-treatment in prison.

International PEN calls for their immediate and unconditional release in accordance with Article 19 of the United Nations International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to which China is a signatory, and seeks immediate assurances that whilst detained they are treated humanely.

According to PEN’s information, prominent writer Zhang Jianhong (aka Li Hong) was arrested on 6 September 2006 when more than 20 police officers searched his home in Ningbo City, Zhejiang Province, Eastern China. His computers were seized and his wife interrogated. He is reportedly charged with ‘incitement to subversion of state power’ for critical articles published online on overseas websites.

Zhang Jianhong, aged 48, is a leading writer in the region and is known for his dissident activities and prolific writings. He is a member of Independent Chinese PEN centre (ICPC).

Zhang was imprisoned from 1989-1991 for his pro-democracy activities. In August 2005 he founded the literary website Aiqinhai.org (http://www.aiqinhai.org/), of which he was editor-in-chief, which was banned by the authorities in March 2006. He is also a regular contributor to the overseas Chinese sites Boxun (http://www.boxun.com) and The Epoch Times (http://www.dajiyuan.com).

Yang Maodong (aka Guo Feixiong), a well-known dissident writer, independent publisher and civil rights activist, has been detained since 14 September 2006. According to his wife, police officers searched their home in Guangzhou City, Guangdong Province, Southern China, and took away Yang’s computers, cell phone, books, manuscripts and other documents. The following day Yang was reportedly charged with illegal business practices for allegedly publishing and selling 20,000 books using false ISBNs (international standard book number). His wife claims that the charges are totally unfounded. There are reports that he is being ill-treated in detention.

Yang Maodong, aged 40, has been known to the authorities for some time for his critical writings and civil rights activism. He was previously detained on 12 September 2005 and held without charge until December 2005 for his involvement in and reporting of an anti-corruption campaign by villagers in Taishi Village, Guangdong Province. PEN campaigned for his release. (http://www.internationalpen.org.uk/index.php?pid=33&aid=393&return=33) Yang has since been subject to repeated harassment by the authorities, most recently on 9 August 2006 when he was reportedly beaten by railway police and briefly detained for carrying an allegedly false ticket.

Yang Maodong is a writer and independent publisher, and his writings include two novels and one collection of short stories. He has also published many essays, poems and articles.

Chen Shuqing, a dissident writer and leading member of Zhejiang Branch of the banned Chinese Democratic Party (CDP), has been detained since 14 September 2006. He went voluntarily to the Daguan Police Station, Hangzhou City, Zhejiang Province, after being summoned the previous day. He was arrested on subversion charges, after which police raided his home and took away his computer and some documents. The reason for the charge is not known, although he is known for his critical articles published on various overseas Chinese Websites such as Boxun, Minzhu Luntan, Dajiyuan, Yi Bao, Guancha, and Xin Shiji.

Chen, aged 42, was previously detained in 1999 for 4 months for his role in the setting up the banned Chinese Democratic Party. After his release, he trained to become a lawyer, but in 2005, after passing his exams, he was refused a lawyer’s licence by the Justice
Bureau of Zhejiang Province, who alleged his articles published online had violated China’s Constitution. Chen challenged this ruling in court, but lost the case in both the lower and the appeal courts. He has since been subject to police harassment.

Please send appeals:

  • protesting the detention of writers Zhang Jianhong (aka Li Hong), Yang Maodong (aka Guo Feixiong) and Chen Shuqing, and calling for their immediate and unconditional release in accordance with Article 19 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to which China became a signatory in 1998;
  • seeking immediate assurances that they are not ill-treated in prison;
  • urging the authorities to respect their basic rights whilst detained and to granted them full access to their families, lawyers and any necessary medical care.

Please note that there are no fax numbers for the Chinese authorities. WiPC recommends that you copy your appeal to the Chinese embassy in your country asking them to forward it and welcoming any comments.

Government addresses:
His Excellency Hu Jintao
President of the People’s Republic of China
State Council
Beijing 100032
P.R.China.

Procurator General Mr. Jia Chunwang
Supreme People’s Procuratorate
Beiheyan Street 147
100726 Beijing
P.R.China

Please note that fax numbers are no longer available for the Chinese authorities, so you may wish to ask the diplomatic representative for China in your country to forward your appeals.

Please copy appeals to the diplomatic representative for China in your country if possible.

Posted in censorship, Chen Shuqing, China, Dissident, Guo Feixiong, Internet, Journalist, Law, Li Hong, News, People, Politics, Social, Speech | Comments Off on Writers in Prison: China’s Crackdown on Dissident Writers