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    Reporters Without Borders said in it’s 2005 special report titled “Xinhua: the world’s biggest propaganda agency”, that “Xinhua remains the voice of the sole party”, “particularly during the SARS epidemic, Xinhua has for last few months been putting out news reports embarrassing to the government, but they are designed to fool the international community, since they are not published in Chinese.”
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Archive for the ‘intellectual’ Category

Banned Book ‘Tombstone’ Chinese Author Yang Jisheng Receives Literary Prize in New York

Posted by Author on June 1, 2013


A former senior editor for the Chinese Communist Party’s propaganda mouthpiece collected the Manhattan Institute’s Hayek Prize Wednesday night.

The book award is given by the libertarian-leaning think tank to acknowledge recent works that “best reflect Hayek’s vision of economic and individual liberty.” It comes with a $50,000 cash prize. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in books, China, intellectual, People, Politics, Social, World, writer | Comments Off on Banned Book ‘Tombstone’ Chinese Author Yang Jisheng Receives Literary Prize in New York

Chinese Intellectuals Avoid Key Issues Amid Censorship Fears, Says Award-winning Author

Posted by Author on February 8, 2013


Chinese writers have shirked their responsibilities in the face of tougher censorship over the past 10 years, one of the country’s authors has said.

Yan Lianke, whose bleakly humorous novel Lenin’s Kisses is published in Britain on Thursday, had two books banned in the past decade. He said it had been easier to publish in the five years before that. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in censorship, China, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, intellectual, People, Politics, World | Comments Off on Chinese Intellectuals Avoid Key Issues Amid Censorship Fears, Says Award-winning Author

Where Does the Chinese People’s Discontent Come From?- Economist Mao Yushi’s New Book

Posted by Author on February 3, 2013


Why is there such great social discontent in China?

Mao Yunshi, a well-known economist, just published a new book “Where does Chinese People’s Anxiety Come From”.

In this book, he objectively analyzes all kinds of issues that China is facing from an economic point of view. He utilized real cases and economic analyses to reflect Chinese people’s current spiritual and living situation. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, intellectual, People, Social, World | Comments Off on Where Does the Chinese People’s Discontent Come From?- Economist Mao Yushi’s New Book

China Fears Intellectuals

Posted by Author on May 17, 2011


Beijing is now said to have problems in the balance of the economic growth and social stability, and it is not the protests from farmers, authorities worry about, but from well-educated middle class. When facing crackdown and entice from CCP (Chinese Communist Party), intellectuals need to carefully weigh out their social responsibilities.

German Development Institute fellow Doris Fischer wrote for Times 『Beijing』s Panic Of Intellectuals.』 She said that CCP followed two guidelines, the social stability and the economic growth, trying to find the balance in between. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, intellectual, Journalist, News, People, Politics, Social, World | 1 Comment »

Amnisty International- URGENT ACTION: Falun Gong practitioner at risk of torture in China: Guo Xiaojun

Posted by Author on December 21, 2010


Falun Gong practitioner, Guo Xiaojun, a former lecturer at Jiaotong University in Shanghai, is at risk of torture and other ill-treatment in prison. He was convicted solely on charges which relate to his practice of Falun Gong and based on a confession he says was extracted through torture.

Guo Xiaojun was taken from his home in Shanghai by eight plainclothes police and security officers on 7 January, 2010. They forced their way into his home, without a warrant, and pushed him to the ground in front of his wife and four year old child, cutting his head. The police then ransacked his home, finding only a few books relating to Falun Gong. Police then took him to the Baoshan District detention centre. He was later charged with ‘using a heretical organization to subvert the law’ based on allegations that he had distributed Falun Gong materials. This charge was made following a confession which Guo Xiaojun told lawyers’ was extracted through torture. Since his detention Guo’s family have not been able to visit him. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, East China, Falun Gong, Freedom of Belief, Human Rights, intellectual, Law, News, People, Politics, Religion, shanghai, Social, Torture, World | Comments Off on Amnisty International- URGENT ACTION: Falun Gong practitioner at risk of torture in China: Guo Xiaojun

Are You Being Followed by “the Man” ? (3)- What Kind of Job is “Security Information Personnel” at China School?

Posted by Author on March 19, 2010


He Qinglian, Chinese author and economist, via SecretChina.com, Mar. 17, 2010- (cont’d)

<< previous

3. What Kind of Job is “Security Information Personnel” at School?

Here is a rough description of the system.

a. The school selects some “politically reliable” students who, once they hear some “politically incorrect” comments from teachers or students, will report them to the related office in school administration.  For example, the “Security Information Team” established by Economy and Trade College in Qingdao Technological University has “two students in each class, one male one female. “ They must be student Party members or student cadre. Their prime responsibility is to report the “insecure elements” in their classes and dormitories, including the behavior of some “special students” and the content of some teachers’ lectures.

b. The Information Personnel job is a paid position. The amount they are paid varies in different schools. It could be very low. For example, at Jilin University each informer, if he or she makes twenty reports, he or she can get a 120 Chinese yen reimbursement for his or her books. So each report is worth six yen, which is less than one US dollar. Students from poor families still want to take the job. For instance, Dezhou Institute in Shandong Province has offered their students extracurricular job opportunities to have them work as “Security Information Personnel.”

c. A Security Personnel who does a good job can secure favorable consideration from the school in terms of grading and political advancement. One striking characteristic of such rules of terror is that the Security Personnel are allowed to report incidents based merely on rumor. They are not asked to authenticate the information. This, along with the number of reports affecting the rate of pay, makes many of the personnel create “information” out of nowhere in exchange for the reward, risking the well-being of their teachers and classmates.

In some schools, the “Security Personnel” team is incredibly large. Take for example, the Xi’an Technology University, which received the title of “Peaceful University of Shanxi Province”, jointly given by the Comprehensive Administration Office of Shanxi Province, the Department of Education, and the Department of Public Security. There are 2,627 Security Personnel among the students. In addition, among the staff and faculty members, 65 have been ascribed to be Special Information Personnel. The total number of undergraduates, graduates and three-year college students is 23,404; the number of staff and faculty is 2,326. Consequently, there is one Security Personnel in every ten students or fewer. For every 35 staff and faculty, there is one informer.

Perhaps in no other country in the entire the world can you find universities or colleges like China’s, which turns college, a place for imparting knowledge and nurturing intellectuals, into sites of spies, eroding the soul of the youngsters by encouraging the shameless behavior of “reporting”. (to be cont’d)

– From Secret China , Original Chinese article from Author’s website

Related:
Are You Being Followed by “the Man” ? (1) – Informer Is Everywhere in China
Are You Being Followed by “the Man” ? (2)- Schools Have Become Sites of the Spies

Posted in China, Commentary, He Qinglian, intellectual, News, Opinion, Overseas Chinese, People, Politics, Social, spy, Student, World, writer | Comments Off on Are You Being Followed by “the Man” ? (3)- What Kind of Job is “Security Information Personnel” at China School?

Review (video): Shen Yun Performing Arts’ Chinese Dance and Music Show

Posted by Author on January 24, 2010


Here’s a video review from professionals from around the world talking in their languages about the Shen Yun Performing Arts show, which  has been called as “mind-blowing”, “the best”, “the top”,  “state of the arts”, “perfection”.

Video  length: 2’49”, with English captions.

Show Name: Shen Yun
Produced by:
Shen Yun Performing Arts
Official Website:

http://www.shenyunperformingarts.org/

Show features:

– classical Chinese choreography
– stunning costumes
– 3D digital backdrops
– live orchestra

Related:
Shen Yun Review, by Senior Manager for the Grammy Awards, Feb 5, 2010
Video highlight (2): Shen Yun show 2010
Video highlight (1): Shen Yun show 2010
Collection of Shen Yun 2010 Show Promotion Videos (HD)

Posted in Artists, Chinese Culture, Culture, Dance, Entertainment, Event, intellectual, Music, News, Opinion, People, review, Shen Yun show, shows, Video, World | 6 Comments »

10 Forbidden Stories of 2009 in China (7)- Activists flee and testify to human rights violations

Posted by Author on January 16, 2010


Epoch Times Staff, updated: Jan 7, 2010 – (cont’d)

Qiu Mingwei, former editor of the Peoples Daily online internet forum. (Xu Xia/Epoch Times)

<< Previous

A number of activists flee China and testify to human rights violations

A number of dissidents fled China during the course of 2009, wresting freedom for themselves and embarrassing the Chinese authorities in the process.

Among them was Qiu Mingwei , deputy director of the People’s Forum, the public Internet forum of the People’s Daily, the CCP’s official mouthpiece. Qiu had participated in a July 1 march for democracy and human rights in Hong Kong. When he returned to China he was accused of “possessing secret state documents, and speaking to outside sources without permission.”

Rather than defend himself he chose to make a break for it, and fled to Hong Kong on July 30. Escapees in 2009 also include the wife and children of Gao Zhisheng, a human rights lawyer who published an account of 50 days of tortured and whose current whereabouts are unknown after being seized by the regime. (to be cont’d)

Original report from The Epochtimes

Posted in China, Dissident, Human Rights, intellectual, News, People, Politics, Social | Comments Off on 10 Forbidden Stories of 2009 in China (7)- Activists flee and testify to human rights violations

The imprisonment of Liu Xiaobo recalls a bleak tradition of China’s repression

Posted by Author on December 26, 2009


The Times, UK, Dec. 26, 2009-

Communist China was born amid trumped-up charges against supposed enemies of the State. The eleven-year prison sentence imposed yesterday on Liu Xiaobo, a literary scholar and the country’s most prominent dissident, demonstrates a bleak continuity in the regime’s practices. It was a peculiarly cynical touch that the judgment was issued on Christmas Day.

Liu was seized from his home a year ago. One of his compatriots — a blogger, in a country that seeks to control access to the internet — pointedly referred to him yesterday as the Chinese Mandela. The comparison is not far-fetched, except that in his trial for high treason in 1963, Nelson Mandela at least had the opportunity to make a five-hour speech.

Liu was given no opportunity to respond to his sentence, which was a foregone conclusion. His “crimes” consist of calls for political reform. He published half a dozen online articles, including one for the BBC, and organised a petition for a reform entitled Charter 08. His model was the Charter 77 movement in Czechoslovakia, which proved to be a rallying point, that aided the triumph of liberty. Several hundred Chinese intellectuals have signed Liu’s petition. As happened in Czechoslovakia, a repressive communist regime uses a catch-all law against subversion in order to stifle dissent.

Western diplomacy faces a conundrum. China has emerged as a 21st-century economic giant, yet its embrace of the global market has gone unaccompanied by political reform. There is a long tradition in Western political thought, from Charles James Fox through the Victorian free- traders John Bright and Richard Cobden, that sees commerce as the route to comity. Yet China is a counter to the assumption that repressive regimes are inevitably softened by greater prosperity, and a burgeoning middle class.

As the advanced industrial democracies suffer the consequences of a huge financial crisis, China’s relative influence in the global economy has increased. It is as if, having attained a crucial status in international economic relations, China’s regime sees its new prosperity as a means of asserting its political model. Western governments must deal with that fact.

Western standards of living are increasingly tied to China. America’s wide current account deficit is, in effect, being supported by the huge stock of savings that China has built up and invested in dollar-denominated financial instruments over the past decade. China matters to the West. Yet it appears, from the draconian treatment meted out to Liu, that it is futile to expect economic development on its own to support trends towards Western liberal political rights within China.

There lies the diplomatic importance of the Liu case. A brave man has been treated in the worst traditions of an autocratic regime. As Liu takes as his model the campaigns for human rights in the Eastern bloc, then Western governments should follow him. The Helsinki final agreement, signed by the US and the Soviet Union in 1975, established human rights as an integral concern of the superpower relationship and gave heart to dissident movements. As Liu begins his incarceration, the West should seek a new Helsinki with an emerging superpower. Trade is not enough.

The Times

Posted in Business, China, Dissident, Economy, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, intellectual, Law, News, People, Politics, Speech, Trade, World | 1 Comment »

China: Liu Xiaobo’s 11-Year Sentence Send Message of Zero Tolerance for Universal Human Rights

Posted by Author on December 25, 2009


Human Rights in China, December 25, 2009 –

In one of the most high-profile political trials in China in recent years, a Beijing court today found Liu Xiaobo (刘晓波) guilty of “inciting subversion of state power” and sentenced him to 11 years of imprisonment and two years’ deprivation of political rights.  Liu’s lawyers told Human Rights in China (HRIC) they do not agree with the decision, stating that Liu was merely exercising his right as a citizen to freedom of expression. According to his lawyers and family, Liu plans to appeal.

“The guilty verdict demonstrates once again the Chinese authorities’ intolerance for free expression and their incapacity to respond constructively to critical voices,” said Sharon Hom, HRIC’s executive director. “But the Chinese government must recognize that the free pass on human rights that it has been receiving from the international community will not insulate it forever from the growing demands of its own people for freedom and democratic reforms.”

“By using the police and security apparatus and the legal system to violate the rights of its citizens, the Chinese government may find itself, in time, subverting its own state power,” said Hom.

The conviction and sentence were pronounced by judge Jia Lianchun (贾连春) of the Beijing Municipal No. 1 Intermediate People’s Court (北京市第一中级人民法院), who previously convicted and sentenced rights defense lawyer Gao Zhisheng (高智晟) and AIDS activist Hu Jia (胡佳) on similar charges. The government based the conviction on Liu’s role in drafting and organizing the signing of Charter 08, a petition issued in December 2008 calling for human rights protection and political reform, and on six essays Liu published between 2005 and 2007 critical of the Chinese government. (Click here for excerpts selected and translated by Human Rights in China.)

Liu, 53, was detained, imprisoned, and put under house arrest many times for his writing and activism, including a 20-month detention (June 1989 to January 1991) for participating in the 1989 Democracy Movement, and a three-year Reeducation-Through-Labor sentence (October 1996 to October 1999) for criticizing government corruption. Liu continued to write essays about the human rights condition in China and to advocate for political reform up until his most recent detention on December 8, 2008, one day before the release of Charter 08. In the weeks before Liu’s trial, more than 450 co-signatories of Charter 08 signed an online petition accepting collective responsibility……. (more details from Human Rights in China)

Posted in Activist, Beijing, China, Dissident, Human Rights, intellectual, News, People, Politics, Speech, World | Comments Off on China: Liu Xiaobo’s 11-Year Sentence Send Message of Zero Tolerance for Universal Human Rights

Liu Xiaobo Essay excerpt: “The Communist Party of China’s Dictatorial Patriotism”

Posted by Author on December 25, 2009


Essay excerpts from “The CPC’s Dictatorial Patriotism” (《中共的独裁爱国主义》) (2005), Via Human Rights in China website-

. . . Since the Communist Party of China (CPC) took power, it has always yakked about patriotism in order to maintain its absolute rule over the people and country. It has also emphasized a specious logic of governance — the theory of “death of the party is death of the nation”. . . .

In fact, the “death of the party” and the “death of the nation” have no inevitable causality. This is because any political party is a representative of a special interest group and does not have the grounds to assert that it represents the “nation, ethnic groups, and people.” Even if it is the ruling party, it does not equal the nation, and even less the ethnic groups or culture. The CPC regime does not equal China, and even less the Chinese culture. . . .

All dictatorships like to proclaim patriotism but dictatorial patriotism is just an excuse to inflict disasters on the nation and calamities on its people. The official patriotism advocated by the CPC dictatorship is a fallacious system of “substituting the party for the country.” The essence of this patriotism is to demand that the people love the dictatorship, the one-party rule, and the dictators. It usurps patriotism in order to inflict disasters on the nation and calamities on the people.

(The original Chinese article was first published on the Epoch Times website on October 4, 2005, http://www.epochtimes.com/gb/5/10/4/n1074197.htm.)

– from Human Rights in China

Posted in China, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, intellectual, News, People, Social, World | Comments Off on Liu Xiaobo Essay excerpt: “The Communist Party of China’s Dictatorial Patriotism”

Christmas Day in China: 11-year jail sentence for free speech activist Liu Xiaobo

Posted by Author on December 25, 2009


Reporters Without Borders, Dec. 25, 2009-

Reporters Without Borders is profoundly shocked by this unbelievable and outrageous sentence. A Beijing court today sentenced leading Chinese free speech activist Liu Xiaobo 刘晓波) to eleven years in prison on a charge of subverting state authority for posting outspoken articles online and helping to draft Charter 08, a call for democratic reform. He had been facing a possible 15-year sentence. The dissident said he would appeal.

“It is a disgrace that Liu Xiaobo is going to spend the next eleven years in prison when all he did was defend free expression and participate in a debate about his country’s future with many other Chinese intellectuals,” Reporters Without Borders said. “It is also disgraceful that such a sentence was announced on Christmas Day.”

The press freedom organisation added: “Where are the universal values of freedom of expression that China is supposed to represent in Shanghai in 2010? The national and international pressure for this famous dissident’s release must be redoubled. The international community must not be manipulated by the Chinese authorities, who are trying to minimise reaction by concluding this case during the end-of-year holidays.”

Arrested in December 2008, Liu spent nearly a year in prison before being formally charged with subversion on 12 December. His trial on 23 December was accompanied by a high degree of police surveillance. Dozens of foreign journalists, foreign diplomats and Liu supporters were kept away from the courthouse. Liu’s wife, who had wanted to attend, was prevented from leaving her home.

This is not the first time that the Christmas period has proved to be particularly dangerous for Chinese human rights activists. See the previous release.

Inspired by Charter 77, the charter circulated by Czechoslovak dissidents in 1977, Charter 08 was released on 8 December 2008, two days before the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Originally signed by some 300 intellectuals and human rights activists, it now has more than 10,000 signatures.

A former University of Beijing philosophy professor and winner of the Reporters Without Borders press freedom prize in 2004, Liu is committed to the idea that the Chinese media will one day be able to operate as a real fourth estate and stand up to the omnipotent Communist Party.

Examples of some of Liu’s statements about free expression.

Reporters Without Borders

Posted in Beijing, China, Dissident, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, intellectual, Law, News, People, Politics, Speech, World | Comments Off on Christmas Day in China: 11-year jail sentence for free speech activist Liu Xiaobo

China: What Constitutes Liu Xiaobo’s “Incitement to Subvert State Power”?

Posted by Author on December 23, 2009


Human Rights In China, December 23, 2009 –

The trial of prominent intellectual Liu Xiaobo (刘晓波) in the Beijing Municipal No. 1 Intermediate People’s Court (北京市第一中级人民法院) took less than three hours under near total security lock down outside the courtroom. Like much of China’s judicial process, especially cases deemed politically sensitive, what happened inside the courtroom remains largely out of public view. What is known includes: Liu pleaded not guilty to the charge of “incitement to subvert state power”; about twenty people attended the trial as observers, including Liu’s brother, Liu Xiaoxuan (刘晓暄), and brother-in-law; the presiding judge was Jia Lianchun (贾连春), who previously convicted and sentenced rights defense lawyer Gao Zhisheng (高智晟) and AIDs activist Hu Jia (胡佳) on the same charges; and the verdict will be issued on Friday, December 25.

Many were barred from the trial, including Liu’s wife, Liu Xia (刘霞). Personnel from about a dozen foreign embassies in Beijing, including those of the United States, Germany, and Australia, requested to observe the trial but were told that all the observer passes had already been given out. Liu’s lawyers, Zhang Baojun (尚宝军) and Ding Xikui (丁锡奎), are reportedly under strict orders from the State Judicial Bureau not to grant any interview until after the verdict.

Liu, 53, has been in detention for more than a year, since December 8, 2008, one day before the release of Charter 08. In the weeks before his trial, more than 450 co-signatories of Charter 08 have signed an online petition accepting collective responsibility. Last week, activist Ding Zilin (丁子霖) called upon Liu’s supporters to “join” the trial by gathering outside the courtroom. Human Rights in China (HRIC) has learned that many rights activists who had planned to go to the court, including Ding Zilin herself, have been put under surveillance or house arrest, and others who made it to the court, including Jiang Qisheng (江棋生), Zhang Hong (章虹), Zhang Xianling (张先玲), Liu Di (刘荻), and Teng Biao (滕彪), were forcibly taken away by police.

Liu’s lawyers pointed out that the government bases its charge on 1). Liu’s role in drafting and organizing the signing of Charter 08, an appeal for human rights protection and political reform issued in December 2008 that has since garnered more than 10,000 signatures online, and 2). six essays that Liu published between 2005 and 2007.

“If proposing democratic reform and raising questions about the current leadership constitute incitement to subvert state power, then freedom of speech has been completely gutted in China,” said Sharon Hom, executive director of Human Rights in China.

So that the public can get a closer look at what the Chinese government considers to be “incitement to subvert state power,” HRIC is providing below the English translation of excerpts from Liu’s six essays……. (more details from Human Rights In China)

Posted in Beijing, China, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, intellectual, Law, News, People, Politics, World | Comments Off on China: What Constitutes Liu Xiaobo’s “Incitement to Subvert State Power”?

Visiting Chinese Scholar Blocked by China Stranded in Sweden

Posted by Author on December 9, 2009


By Huizhi, Epoch Times Staff, Dec. 9, 2009 –

SWEDEN—Visiting scholar Xiao Qiao is stranded in Sweden with no legal status after she was banned from returning home to Shanghai by the Shenzhen Public Security Bureau.

In 2002 Xiao, whose given name is Li Jianhong, started an independent Web site in China called QiMeng Forum or A Forum for Enlightenment. The site carried information about the June 4th Tiananmen Square Massacre and was shut down by Chinese authorities.

Xiao came to Sweden in 2008 by invitation of the Swedish Ministry of Culture. She lived in Stockholm on a visa until October of 2009. On her return trip to Shanghai, the Division of Exit-Entry Administration in Shenzhen deported her to Hong Kong—a place where she has no permanent residency status. Consequently, she flew back to Sweden to appeal for humanitarian intervention.

In an interview with The Epoch Times, Xiao said, “My passport has expired. I have submitted a letter to the Chinese embassy appealing my passport status. In addition, I am demanding an open apology and financial compensation from the Division of Exit-Entry Administration of the Shenzhen Public Security Bureau for denying my re-entry into China last month.”…… (more details from The Epochtimes)

Posted in China, Human Rights, intellectual, News, People, Politics, Social, World | Comments Off on Visiting Chinese Scholar Blocked by China Stranded in Sweden

China’s Famous AIDS Activist Arrives in U.S.– New book exposes the AIDS epidemic

Posted by Author on November 28, 2009


By Liang Zhen, Epoch Times Staff, Nov. 28, 2009-

After more than two years of silence, 82-year-old Gao Yaojie spoke publicly in Hong Kong at the release of her new book, China’s AIDS Plague: 10,000 Letters. Through a review of individual cases, the book uncovers the making of a man-made disaster led by Chinese Communist Party (CCP) officials. She asserts that millions have been victimized because of a blanket of silence and misinformation imposed by the communist regime.

Dr. Gao, formerly a professor at the Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, and known as one of China’s foremost experts on AIDS, has now arrived in the U.S. She plans to hold a press conference in Washington, D.C. on Dec. 1—World AIDS Day.

Pastor Bob Fu of the U.S.-based ChinaAid Association assisted Dr. Gao in leaving China. The pastor said that Gao managed to come to the U.S. with legal status despite the Communist Party’s efforts to block her from leaving. Over the past three months, Gao has been in hiding, forced to keep moving from place to place to avoid almost certain abduction and persecution, Fu said. Because of the necessity of keeping her whereabouts unknown, not even Dr. Gao’s family knew that she had come to the U.S.

The New Book

Gao first paid attention to the spread of AIDS in China in 1996, and began devoting all of her efforts towards AIDS prevention and rescue. She traveled to villages throughout Henan Province, using her own pension money to treat more than 1,000 patients. She also printed hundreds of thousands of flyers to educate peasants about the causes of the epidemic.

Initially her actions received a lot of attention, and many patients began to contact her. Desperate victims wrote to her, describing their situations and looking for help. The letters arrived by the thousands. When letter number 10,001 arrived, she decided to publish them as a way of raising awareness.

The new book discusses problems in China’s medical system such as people selling fake drugs to exploit AIDS patients for money. She writes that Chinese Communist Party officials, for a share of the money, provide protection for these profiteers. Others, in collusion with their doctors, pretend to be AIDS patients to receive a government subsidy. Orphans become ill after contracting the disease from their parents, and AIDS patients are treated very unfairly.

First Book Suppressed

Gao ’s original book, 10,000 Letters, published in 2004, received the Best Chinese Book Award in 2005. Hundreds of influential people attended the awards ceremony in the Great Hall of the People hosted by Beijing News and the Nanfang Daily. Despite the accolades, however, and much to Gao’s surprise, few copies were sold.

She could not understand what happened but remembered several people at the ceremony telling her that “the content was poorly edited and the stories seemed overly simplified.” They suggested that she rewrite the book using the original letters. That evening, Gao met with her editor, asking him to recheck the book. The young man burst into tears but said nothing. After half an hour, he left quietly.

Through this incident, Gao felt the unspoken pressure keenly. She decided not to hand over the original letters, and did not reply to anyone else offering to publish her book. Five years later, when her contract with the publisher expired, she contracted with Open Magazine in Hong Kong to publish this revision of her previous book…….(More details from The Epochtimes)

Posted in Activist, AIDS, China, Health, intellectual, Life, News, People, World | Comments Off on China’s Famous AIDS Activist Arrives in U.S.– New book exposes the AIDS epidemic

China Democracy Activist Guo Quan Sentenced 10 Years for Subversion

Posted by Author on October 20, 2009


NTDTV, 2009-10-20 –

A former Chinese judge and university professor has been found guilty of “subversion of state power” and given a 10-year prison sentence. Guo Quan had challenged China’s one-party rule.

Guo had been detained several times since 2007 for things like posting articles on the Internet that called for a democratic system in China. In 2008, he founded the New Democracy Party of China.

Guo’s online postings eventually became a target of China’s Internet police, and he was fired from his job at Nanjing Normal University. Last November, he was arrested in Nanjing and has been detained ever since.

On Friday, the Suqian Intermediate People’s Court in Jiangsu Province found Guo guilty of so-called “subversion of state power.” The ill-defined charge is often used by the communist regime to suppress political dissidents.

One legal expert told Sound of Hope Radio that the verdict is against China’s own constitution.

[Professor Zhang Zanning, Chinese Law Expert]:
“This is like the modern literary inquisition. Legally, it doesn’t have a foot to stand on. Doesn’t China’s constitution allow the freedom of expression and the freedom of association? So this verdict violates the constitution.”

NTDTV

Posted in China, Freedom of Speech, Guo Quan, Human Rights, intellectual, Jiangsu, Law, Nanjing, News, People, Politics, SE China, Social, Speech, World | Comments Off on China Democracy Activist Guo Quan Sentenced 10 Years for Subversion

China: Public interest organization director detained by police for 7 days without explanation

Posted by Author on August 4, 2009


Human Rights in China, August 04, 2009 –

Seven days after Xu Zhiyong (许志永), the director of Gongmeng, a public interest organization in Beijing, was taken away by State Security of the Beijing Municipal Public Security Bureau, there is still no official explanation for his detention. According to unofficial reports, Xu Zhiyong is being detained on tax evasion charges and is currently being held at the Beijing No. 1 Detention Center.

Gongmeng, also known as Open Constitution Initiative (OCI), is an organization set up to provide legal consultation and assistance to the public. Despite the public-interest nature of its work, Gongmeng has registered as a for-profit company in order to operate independent of government control. Under Chinese regulations, all civil society organizations must be supervised by a high-level government unit, an arrangement that effectively puts them under direct government control. On July 17, the Chinese authorities shut down Gongmeng’s Law Research Center, citing its failure to register with the government. Three days earlier, tax authorities had notified Gongmeng that they would be fined 1.42 million yuan ($208,000) for tax violations. Gongmeng’s website has also been shut down by the authorities.

Xu Zhiyong, 36, is a professor at the Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications and was a representative of Beijing’s Haidian District at the Thirteenth and Fourteenth People’s Congress. In October 2003, he, Yu Jiang, Zhang Xing Shui, and Teng Biao founded Gongmeng with the goal of advancing the rule of law and social justice, and promoting civil rights defense activities. Its high effectiveness has gained it the moniker the “cradle” of China’s rights defense lawyers. It recently provided continuous legal assistance to the victims of the Sanlu tainted milk scandal in their damages compensation lawsuit.

Xu Zhiyong was born in Minquan County, Henan Province. Having resolved in middle school to devote himself to public service, he earned his Bachelor of Law and Master of Law degrees at Lanzhou University. He later entered Peking University Law School, where he gained a doctorate. His pursuit of rights defense issues has included many famous cases: in 2003, Xu Zhiyong, Yu Jiang, and Teng Biao petitioned the People’s Congress in the Sun Zhigang incident,1 and one month later, the custody and forced repatriation procedure was abolished. Xu Zhiyong also defended the legal rights and interests of privately-run enterprises in the Sun Dawu2 case and represented Chen Guoqing3 from Chengde in a nine-year-long case of deferred death sentence. Unafraid of violence, he has persisted in investigating “black jails” used to lock up government petitioners.

Human Rights in China urges the international community to scrutinize the progress of Xu Zhiyong’s case. “It is clear the authorities are using the legal process to harass and prosecute right defense lawyers,” said Sharon Hom, executive director of Human Rights in China. “By suppressing Xu Zhiyong, who is a moderate voice for social change and has dedicated his career to helping forge a society with genuine rule of law, the authorities are running the risk of radicalizing the forces for reform and change in China.”

Human Rights in China

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China: Retired Dissident Professor Beaten to Ribs Broken

Posted by Author on April 7, 2009


Human Rights in China, April 06, 2009-

On April 4, 2009, Sun Wenguang (孙文广), 75, retired professor of Shandong University, was brutally beaten by five unidentified men as he returned from paying respects to memory of the late Zhao Ziyang, former General Secretary of the Communist Party of China who visited students on Tiananmen Square during the 1989 democracy movement, and of Zhang Zhixin, a dissident killed during the Cultural Revolution.

In the early morning of Qing Ming, the traditional day of remembering and honoring the dead, Sun defied university authorities to make the trip to Yingxiong Mountain (英雄山) in Jinan, Shandong Province. The police sent nine vehicles to follow Sun’s taxi. He was attacked at around 10:00 a.m. The attackers threw him down a two-meter drop and then beat him for over ten minutes, breaking three of his ribs. He was brought to Jinan’s Qilu Hospital (齐鲁医院). At present he is unable to turn his head but is conscious and reportedly in stable condition.

Between 1966 and 1981, Sun Wenguang was detained and imprisoned multiple times for a total of more than ten years for expressing his opinions on political issues. In the days leading up to the 2008 Beijing Olympics, Sun was put under 24-hour surveillance. Unidentified persons scrawled “Traitor, Rapist” on the walls of his home, and his home was searched by state security police, who seized two computers, manuscripts, and books published in Hong Kong. In March 2009, Sun sued Shandong University for deducting from his pension after Sun refused to sell his house at the price the university offered, which he claimed was only one-tenth of its market value. The case has not yet reached a resolution.

“Human Rights in China condemns the violence against Sun Wenguang,” said Sharon Hom, executive director of HRIC. “This deplorable act, committed in broad daylight and clear view of the police, against a man for remembering a former Party secretary on Qing Ming, calls into serious question officials’ professed commitment to building a society that puts people first.” HRIC urges the authorities to undertake a thorough investigation of the crime and bring those responsible to justice.

Human Rights in China

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Former Lawmaker: “Shen Yun’s magnificent performance” Would Be a Blessing for Hong Kong

Posted by Author on March 25, 2009


By Billy Shyu, Epoch Times Staff, Mar 22, 2009-

HSINCHU, Taiwan
— The New York-based Shen Yun (Divine) Performing Arts International Company successfully concluded its last show in Hsinchu on the evening of March 22. Mr. Tai Cheuk-Yin, former Member of Hong Kong Legislative Council, flew all the way from Hong Kong to Taiwan to see Shen Yun and said that he was lucky to see the show in Hsinchu.

“Shen Yun’s magnificent performance reminded us of China’s prosperity in the Tang Dynasty and the tribulations people nowadays are suffering in China. What’s more important is that it inspired us to think about our future, and how to pass down the 5,000-year-old Chinese culture.

“In fact, each piece of the program is unique, from the opening act depicting the divinely bestowed culture [The Five Millennia Begin], to the Tibetan folk dance [Dance of the Snow-Capped Mountain] performed later. Every act was embedded with different meanings and implications. Every program was really wonderful, and every dancer’s performance was at an international standard.”

Mr. Tai also mentioned that Shen Yun had broadened his horizons. He added, “I really admire them, and I really benefitted by coming here.”

As an overseas Chinese who values Chinese history very much, Mr. Tai praised Shen Yun highly, saying, “It is indeed very remarkable to interpret the 5,000-year-old traditional culture so well in such a short period of time.

“People in China nowadays and those who have moved overseas should see the show presented by Shen Yun, so they are able to carefully ponder their future. I felt it [the Shen Yun show] conveyed many important messages, which deserve to be considered, so that people can better plan their future.

“If Hong Kong people have the opportunity to see this wonderful show, it would a blessing for them. They would be able to gain enlightenment from it, and their inner world would be more peaceful. I felt that they [Hong Kong people] have many choices,” he continued. In addition, he said that as a resident of Hong Kong, he looked forward to the time when Shen Yun would perform there.

As to his flying thousands of miles from Hong Kong to see this magnificent show, Mr. Tai said, “I have benefited tremendously from it. The entire show conveys strong messages. If more people were able to enjoy this wonderful performance, I think it would be great. As a matter of fact, this is something that needs our concerted efforts. Let’s look forward to it together.”

The Epoch Times is a proud sponsor of the Shen Yun Performing Arts 2009 World Tour. For more information please visit ShenYunPerformingArts.org

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Leading dissident’s house arrest signals China’s rejection of dialogue

Posted by Author on January 6, 2009


Reporters Without Borders, 2 January 2009 –

Reporters Without Borders
reiterates its call for the release of leading free speech activist Liu Xiaobo (刘晓波), who has been held in a secret location since his arrest on 8 December. Liu was reportedly placed under a form of house arrest yesterday under article 57 of the code of criminal procedure.

“Liu has been held for nearly a month in an unknown location without any official explanation because he helped to draft Charter 8, a call for democratic reform in China,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The harassment of its signatories is not letting up, and Liu’s detention is meant as a signal to all Chinese dissidents. By putting him under house arrest, the authorities are making it clear they reject any form of dialogue about the country’s situation.”

Inspired by Charter 77, the charter circulated by Czechoslovak dissidents in 1977, Charter 8 was released on 8 December, two days before the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Originally signed by some 300 intellectuals and human rights activists, it now has more than 5,000 signatures.

Signatories who have been harassed include dissident Zang Zuhua, who was detained by members of the Beijing Public Security Bureau on 26 December for the second time since 8 December (this time for three hours), and Wen Kejian (温克坚), a writer from the eastern region of Hangzhou, who was briefly detained on 25 December.

A former University of Beijing philosophy professor, Liu refuses to give up on the idea that the Chinese media will one day be able to operate as a real fourth estate and stand up to the omnipotent Communist Party. He was awarded the Reporters Without Borders prize for press freedom in 2004.

Reporters Without Borders

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Crackdown lays bare China’s harder stance

Posted by Author on January 4, 2009


By Jamil Anderlini, Kathrin Hille, The Financial Times, January 3 2009-

China celebrated the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights last month by detaining prominent dissidents across the country.

Their apparent transgression was signing their names on “Charter 08”, a manifesto published on the internet on December 10 calling for all Chinese citizens inside and outside the government to embrace the “rapid establishment of a free, democratic and constitutional country” and the end of one-party authoritarian rule by the Communist party.

Many of the signatories are prominent establishment intellectuals not known for their radical views or political activism. In private, Chinese intellectuals are calling Charter 08 the most significant document of its kind for at least a decade and probably since the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre.

Beijing clearly sees it as a serious challenge to its authority at a time when rising unemployment and a cooling economy are heightening social tensions. The country’s efficient repression apparatus has swung into action, with at least 70 of the 303 people who initially signed the charter summoned or interrogated.

While the government has recently tried hard to portray itself as more open to dissent, it has now clearly shifted to a tougher stance.

Beijing moved yesterday to silence parents of victims of the poisoned milk scandal, underscoring the determination to quell unauthorised action in response to social and economic problems.

Zhao Lianhai, the organiser of a network of parents whose children fell ill after consuming baby formula tainted with the industrial chemical melamine, was detained as his group prepared to lobby the government jointly for continued free treatment for their children and other victims.

Mr Zhao said he was being held by police at a compound outside Beijing where police formerly held people who were to be sent to labour camps.

“There are more than 20 police watching me here, and they are not letting me go,” Mr Zhao said when contacted by the Financial Times on his mobile phone. “I protest [at] this illegal treatment.”

In a separate case, parents of children killed when their schools collapsed in the May 12 Sichuan earthquake told the FT this week they had been warned that continuing to pursue compensation and talking to foreign journalists were illegal activities that would land them in jail.

China has no such laws, according to rights groups and lawyers.

Charter organisers say it is these sorts of case they are trying to tackle.

“As these conflicts and crises grow ever more intense. . . the decline of the current system has reached the point where change is no longer optional,” according to Charter 08.

All mention of the charter in Chinese is blocked from websites, search engines and even e-mails. Propaganda officials have banned domestic media from interviewing any signatories or publishing any of their work.

According to Amnesty International, the authorities now consider the charter a “counter-revolutionary platform”, a likely sign that signatories will be dealt with more harshly.

Liu Xiaobo, a prominent literary critic and dissident who helped organise the charter, has been held in an undisclosed location for nearly a month without contact with family or a lawyer.

His detention, which apparently violates China’s laws, prompted a long list of academics, legal experts, writers and Nobel prize winners, including Salman Rushdie, Seamus Heaney and Umberto Eco, to send an open letter to Hu Jintao, the Chinese president, last week.

Some other signatories to the charter have come under more subtle pressure. Xu Youyu, professor of philosophy at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, a government think-tank, was asked by a senior academy official at his academy for details of the charter, and then told the document was illegal and ordered to retract his signature.

“In fact the charter is consistent with China’s own constitution and in line with the United Nations human rights conventions that China has already signed and I absolutely refuse to retract my support for this document,” Prof Xu told the FT. “I’m not scared, even if they take away my job.”

The intimidation and threats have done nothing to damp enthusiasm for the charter among Chinese intellectuals at home and abroad, and the number of signatories has risen to about 7,000.

The Financial Times

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Nobel Laureates around the world and China Scholars Call for Liu Xiaobo’s Release

Posted by Author on December 24, 2008


Reporters Without Borders, 23 December 2008 –

Leading writers, China scholars, lawyers, and human rights advocates from around the world today are releasing a letter to Chinese President Hu Jintao urging the writer Liu Xiaobo’s immediate and unconditional release. Liu is one of some 300 original signatories of Charter 08, a call for the rule of law and respect for human rights in China.

A literary critic and former professor of literature, Liu Xiaobo has been held in incommunicado detention since December 8, 2008. Human Rights Watch has pointed out that the detention of Liu Xiaobo is arbitrary and violates the minimum procedural guarantees specified under Chinese law. Over 30 signatories of Charter 08 have been questioned, summoned by the police, or put under surveillance since Liu’s arrest.

“Liu Xiaobo is the most significant Chinese dissident case in a decade,” said Brad Adams, Asia director for Human Rights Watch. “Jailing Liu might serve as a warning to other dissidents, but it would also indicate a political hardening that runs against the current aspirations of the Chinese people.”

The list of prominent signatories of the letter to President Hu includes top China academics, legal experts, and writers and Nobel prize winners, including Salman Rushdie, Umberto Eco, Nadine Gordimer, Seamus Heaney, Carlo Ginzburg, Wole Soyinka, and Hari Kunzru.

For the full text of the letter and signatories, please visit: http://www.hrw.org/en/news/2008/12/22/letter-consortium-release-liu-xiaobo-chinas-president-hu-jintao

For an English translation of Charter 08, please visit: http://www.nybooks.com/articles/22210

Reporters Without Borders

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Over 5,000 China Scholars Support Charter 08’s Political Reform

Posted by Author on December 20, 2008


By Wang Zhen, Epoch Times Staff, Dec 19, 2008 –

On December 9, one day before the 60th Anniversary of the proclamation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, a diverse group of 303 Chinese jointly published an open letter called “Charter 08,” calling for political reform. The letter has attracted wide attention. By December 17, more than 5,000 people had signed petitions to support the letter.

2008 has been a disastrous year for China, man-made and natural disasters have followed one after another. Over 100 million suffered when severe snowstorms hit southern China in January; a new military crackdown started in Tibet in March; 80,000 people died in the Sichuan earthquake in August; and the melamine-contaminated baby food scandal surfaced in September.

After many years of government suppression of social conflicts, the tension between civilians and the regime is like a cloud of explosive gas waiting for any spark to ignite.

Over 30,000 civilians staged a strike at al police and government center in southwest China to protest a female student’s alleged rape and murder; in June; tens of thousands of people protested and smashed government signs over the government’s involvement in an illegal financing scandal in Central China’s Hunan province in September; more than 50,000 protesters fought with police in northwest China’s Longnan, Gansu province in November. The scale and number of protest in China are increasing monthly.

It was a sure sign of change, that the majority of mainland Chinese showed great sympathy towards alleged cop-killer Yang Jia, who was hastily executed by the regime on November 26, just five days after his death sentence was confirmed by the Supreme Court. Yang’s words“You don’t give me a answer, then I will teach you a lesson” has become the motto of many Chinese living at the lower levels of society. Chinese people now tend to condemn the ruling communist party more openly than ever before, even shouting anti-communist slogans or defacing communist flags to vent their anger.

Compared to the violent civil disobedience mentioned above, “Charter 08” is a gentle appeal; the letter calls for legal reforms, democracy and the protection of human rights, the realization of a power balance, and the nationalization of military power etc.; all ideas which are widely accepted in Chinese scholarly circles.

The letter has been cosigned by many renowned Chinese scholars and activists, such as jurist Yu Haocheng, economist Ma Yishi, attorney Mo Shaoping, writer Liu Xiaobo, journalist Li Datong, attorney and rights activist Zheng Enchong and others.

Political commentator Cheng Pokong said, “Charter 08” is actually a move copying the Czech and Slovak “Charter 77” of 1977. These Chinese scholars appeal to the ones in power with a gentle voice, hoping democracy can be realized in this critical moment in China.

However, the Chinese communist regime could not even tolerate such gentle suggestions; one day before the release of “Charter 08”, the regime detained writer Liu Xiaobo and Constitutional scholar Zhang Zuhua, who took part in drafting the Charter. Although Zhang was released soon after his arrest, Liu’s whereabouts are still unknown.

Immediately, the regime launched a nationwide interrogation and investigation. Many scholars and activists who signed the letter are under surveillance or under house arrest.

Commentators believe, the “Charter 08” incident, once again, proves that the Chinese communist regime cannot improve itself through reform. Visiting Columbia University schola Gao Wenqian, the author of Zhou Enlai: The Last Perfect Revolutionary, commented that Liu’s arrest demonstrates that the current ruling regime has no intension of political reform.

The China Interim Government also declared its support of “Charter 08.” Their declaration also made it clear that the existence of the Chinese Communist Party is itself the ultimate obstruction to realizing the goals of  “Charter 08.” Therefore, the China Interim Government believes that eliminating communist tyranny and disintegrating the CCP is the prerequisite for realizing “Charter08.”

The Epochtimes

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