Status of Chinese People

About China and Chinese people's living condition

  • China Organ Harvesting Report, in 19 languages

  • Torture methods used by China police

  • Censorship

  • Massive protests & riots in China

  • Top 9 Posts (In 48 hours)

  • All Topics

  • Books to Read

    1. A China More Just, Gao Zhisheng
    2.Officially Sanctioned Crime in China, He Qinglian
    3.
    Will the Boat Sink the Water? Chen Guidi, Wu Chuntao
    4.
    Losing the New China, Ethan Gutmann
    5.
    Nine Commentaries on The Communist Party, the Epochtimes
  • Did you know

    Reporters Without Borders said in it’s 2005 special report titled “Xinhua: the world’s biggest propaganda agency”, that “Xinhua remains the voice of the sole party”, “particularly during the SARS epidemic, Xinhua has for last few months been putting out news reports embarrassing to the government, but they are designed to fool the international community, since they are not published in Chinese.”
  • RSS Feeds for Category

    Organ Harvesting

    Human Rights

    Made in China

    Food

    Health

    Environment

    Protest

    Law

    Politics

    Feed address for any specific category is Category address followed by 'Feed/'.

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 223 other followers

Archive for the ‘Zeng Jinyan’ Category

European Parliament Rewards Jailed China Rights Activist Hu Jia

Posted by Author on December 17, 2008


DPA , via earthtimes.org, Wed, 17 Dec 2008 –

Strasbourg – The European Parliament on Wednesday awarded its Sakharov Prize to jailed Chinese human rights activist Hu Jia, rebuffing warnings from Beijing that doing so might damage the European Union’s relations with China. The prize, which each year honours worthy human rights activists around the world, was given to Hu in absentia.

“I would like to express my deep concern that our laureate Hu Jia could not be here today with us and receive the award in person as he remains imprisoned for defending human rights in China – freedom of speech, freedom of thought and the basic right of access to the health service,” said Laima Andrikiene, the conservatives’ spokesman on human rights issues.

The award ceremony in Strasbourg came against the backdrop of souring EU-China relations.

Beijing cancelled an EU-China summit, due to have taken place earlier this month, over a meeting between the rotating chairman of the EU, French President Nicolas Sarkozy, and the Dalai Lama, Tibet’s spiritual and political leader, in Poland.

The wife of the jailed Chinese dissident has thanked the European Parliament and others in the West for their support.

“It is not only for us, it is also for all Chinese human rights defenders,” Zeng Jinyan told Deutsche Presse-Agentur dpa.

“It is important, it makes us feel warm and encouraged,” she said in an interview via the internet, which is normally the only way she can communicate with foreign journalists without police interference.

Attending the ceremony in Strasbourg, which also marked the 20th anniversary of the Sakharov Prize, were a number of former winners. Among them Wei Jingsheng of the Chinese Democratic Movement and the leader of the Belarusian Democratic Opposition, Aliaksandr Milinkevich.

Myanmar’s Aung San Suu Kyi and two Cuban dissidents are among other former winners to have been prevented by their national authorities from receiving the prize in person.

Hu was rewarded by the European Parliament over his efforts to spread knowledge about the AIDS virus and his campaigns to protect the environment.

The Chinese authorities have sentenced him to three and a half years in prison for “inciting subversion of state power”, European lawmakers said.

– DPA, Via The Earth Times: European Parliament rewards Chinese dissident Hu Jia

Posted in Activist, China, Dissident, Freedom of Speech, Hu Jia, Human Rights, Law, News, People, Politics, Speech, World, Zeng Jinyan | Comments Off on European Parliament Rewards Jailed China Rights Activist Hu Jia

China: German MEP and journalists blocked by Beijing police from visiting jailed dissident’s wife

Posted by Author on December 1, 2008


Reporters Without Borders, 25 November 2008-

Reporters Without Borders deplores the behaviour of the Chinese police in preventing European parliament member Helga Trüpel from visiting Zeng Jinyan, the wife of jailed dissident Hu Jia, in her Beijing apartment building today. Foreign journalists who wanted to visit Zeng were also turned back.

Hu Jia is this year’s winner of the European parliament’s Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought.

“How can the Chinese police show so much contempt to a member of the European parliament and to foreign journalists, refusing to let them see a Chinese citizen who wanted to meet them?” Reporters Without Borders said. “We urge the Chinese authorities to lift all the restrictions surrounding Zeng Jinyan and her daughter, and to release Hu Jia at once so that he can go to Strasbourg to receive his prize.”

When Trüpel, a German MEP, arrived at about 3 p.m. today at the Beijing apartment building where Zeng and her one-year-old daughter live, police and guards physically prevented her from going through the gate. The journalists were also turned back although the rules for the foreign press grant them freedom to interview. The police also refused to take the present Trüpel had brought for the girl, making her the world’s youngest political prisoner.

Trüpel told Reporters Without Borders: “It was a very unfriendly situation. Firstly, the secret services followed us by car and were clearly waiting for us outside the apartment building. I wanted to see Zeng Jinyan, whom I already met two years ago. She confirmed to us by phone that she was not allowed to come and see us. I told her by phone that we were proud of her.”

The German MEP from the Green party added: “Preventing a member of the European Parliament to meet Zeng Jinyan, Hu Jia’s wife, reveals that Chinese authorities are furious and unwilling even to open the door to negotiations.”

Trüpel is part of a group of MEPs who are visiting China. During a meeting with Chinese parliamentarians, an official was very critical of the European parliament’s decision to award the Sakharov prize to the “criminal” Hu Jia.

Reporters Without Borders

Posted in Activist, Beijing, censorship, China, Europe, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, Journalist, News, People, politician, Politics, Speech, World, Zeng Jinyan | Comments Off on China: German MEP and journalists blocked by Beijing police from visiting jailed dissident’s wife

China: Beijing police prevent European parliamentarian from visiting jailed dissident’s wife

Posted by Author on November 25, 2008


Reporters Without Borders, Nov. 25, 2008 –

Reporters Without Borders deplores the behaviour of the Chinese police in preventing European parliament member Helga Trüpel from visiting Zeng Jinyan, the wife of jailed dissident Hu Jia, in her Beijing apartment building today. Foreign journalists who wanted to visit Zeng were also turned back.

Hu Jia is this year’s winner of the European parliament’s Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought.

“How can the Chinese police show so much contempt to a member of the European parliament and to foreign journalists, refusing to let them see a Chinese citizen who wanted to meet them?” Reporters Without Borders said. “We urge the Chinese authorities to lift all the restrictions surrounding Zeng Jinyan and her daughter, and to release Hu Jia at once so that he can go to Strasbourg to receive his prize.”

When Trüpel, a German MEP, arrived at about 3 p.m. today at the Beijing apartment building where Zeng and her one-year-old daughter live, police and guards physically prevented her from going through the gate. The journalists were also turned back although the rules for the foreign press grant them freedom to interview. The police also refused to take the present Trüpel had brought for the girl, making her the world’s youngest political prisoner.

Trüpel told Reporters Without Borders: “It was a very unfriendly situation. Firstly, the secret services followed us by car and were clearly waiting for us outside the apartment building. I wanted to see Zeng Jinyan, whom I already met two years ago. She confirmed to us by phone that she was not allowed to come and see us. I told her by phone that we were proud of her.”

The German MEP from the Green party added: “Preventing a member of the European Parliament to meet Zeng Jinyan, Hu Jia’s wife, reveals that Chinese authorities are furious and unwilling even to open the door to negotiations.”

Trüpel is part of a group of MEPs who are visiting China. During a meeting with Chinese parliamentarians, an official was very critical of the European parliament’s decision to award the Sakharov prize to the “criminal” Hu Jia.

Reporters Without Borders

Posted in Activist, Beijing, China, Europe, house arrest, Human Rights, Law, Life, News, People, Politics, Social, Speech, Women, World, Zeng Jinyan | Comments Off on China: Beijing police prevent European parliamentarian from visiting jailed dissident’s wife

European Rights Prize to China Activist Hu Jia hailed as “great victory for Chinese prisoners of conscience”

Posted by Author on October 25, 2008


Reporters Without Borders, Oct. 23, 2008-

Today’s decision by the European Parliament to award the 2008 Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought to Hu Jia, a Chinese human rights activist held since December 2007 for posting articles online and giving interviews to foreign journalists, is welcomed with enthusiasm by Reporters Without Borders.

“Europe is sending a very strong message of solidarity and hope to Chinese prisoners of conscience, of whom Hu Jia is one of the best known,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The Chinese government should heed Europe’s appeal for the release of Hu and other political prisoners. The Chinese authorities are making a big mistake by treating him as a criminal and by threatening both the Nobel Peace Prize jury and the European Parliament’s members.

“The time has come to release Hu and those he defended peacefully, including Chen Guangcheng, Shi Tao and Xu Zerong. This prize is also being awarded for Hu’s tireless work on behalf of the environment, AIDS suffers and prisoners of conscience. China needs men and women like Hu.

“Our thoughts go out above all to Hu’s wife, Zeng Jinyan, and their daughter, who is about to celebrate her first birthday. Watched and harassed by police officers stationed permanently outside her Beijing apartment building, Zeng Jinyan will receive the news of this award with great emotion and dignity, as she has always supported her husband’s fight for human rights.

“We also hail the active support that Hu has received from the European Parliament’s members, especially those in the Greens and Alliance for Liberals and Democrats groups that nominated him, and the courage of the parliament’s president, Hans Gert Pöttering.”

It was Pöttering who announced to a full session of the parliament at noon today that Hu Jia was this year’s winner of the Sakharov Prize, which will be awarded at a ceremony in Strasbourg in December.

The Chinese ambassador to Brussels warned that giving the Sakharov Prize to Hu would have negative consequences for the European Union’s relations with China. “If the European Parliament should award this prize to Hu Jia, that would inevitably hurt the Chinese people once again and bring serious damage to China-EU relations,” the ambassador wrote in a letter to Pöttering.

Aged 35, Hu was recently transferred to Beijing municipal detention centre after spending five months in Hubai prison in Tianjin, 200 km east of Beijing. He has not been getting the medicine he needs for a liver ailment and has been punished several times for defending the rights of fellow inmates.

Arrested on 27 December 2007 on a charge of “inciting subversion of state authority,” Hu was tried on 18 March before a Beijing intermediate court for posting information about matters of state on websites based abroad. The court sentenced him on 3 April 2008 to three and a half years in prison.

A humanitarian activist since the start of the 1990s, Hu was involved not only in HIV prevention and helping HIV/AIDS sufferers, but also in protecting the environment and defending prisoners of conscience. He used the Internet, especially his blog and videos, to expose the regime’s repression of those who defend human rights.

He was arrested and held incommunicado for 40 days in the spring of 2006 and, on his release, he was placed under house arrest. Police stationed around the couple’s apartment building prevented him from going out while his wife, Zeng, was followed whenever she left the apartment.

Hu and Zeng were awarded the Reporters Without Borders – Fondation de France special “China” prize in December 2007. Time magazine named Zeng as one of the world’s 100 most influential people in 2007.

Reporters Without Borders

Posted in Activist, Beijing, China, Dissident, Europe, Freedom of Speech, Hu Jia, Human Rights, News, People, Politics, World, Zeng Jinyan | Comments Off on European Rights Prize to China Activist Hu Jia hailed as “great victory for Chinese prisoners of conscience”

Beijing Activist Zeng Jinyan, Wife of Hu Jia, Disappeared on Eve of Olympics Opening Ceremony

Posted by Author on August 11, 2008


(Chinese Human Rights Defenders, August 9, 2008) – Zeng Jinyan (曾金燕), a Beijing-based human rights activist, disappeared on August 7. All attempts to contact her have failed. It is feared that Zeng has been taken into police custody and might be mistreated.

Zeng has been under intermittent residential surveillance for the last two years by police from the National Security Unit under Beijing Public Security Bureau (PSB). Since her husband and fellow human rights activist, Hu Jia (胡佳) was taken into detention on December 27, 2007, Zeng has been under tightened residential surveillance. Journalists who attempted to visit her at her apartment were turned back by those guarding her. As the Olympics open in Beijing, it is believed that Zeng was taken away to ensure that no journalists will have access to her and that she will be unable to speak out about Hu Jia during the Games.

“The Beijing police are either so incompetent that they would let her disappear under their nose or that they must be responsible for taking her away. How can a young woman with an infant child ‘sabotage’ the Olympics while under such heavy and round-the-clock police presence?” asked a friend of Zeng……. (more details from Chinese Human Rights Defenders)

Posted in Activist, Beijing, China, Human Rights, Law, News, People, Politics, Social, World, Zeng Jinyan | 1 Comment »

Police Occupied Neighbour Room To Monitor Zeng Jinyan With 4~8 Stationing At The Entrance of The Building

Posted by Author on February 22, 2008


Reporters Without Borders, 20 February 2008-

After imprisoned human rights activist Hu Jia was formally charged on 29 January, police stepped up surveillance of the home he shares with his wife in a Beijing apartment building. The police took over an apartment (No. 552) near the couple’s apartment (No. 542) and three security cameras were installed in the grounds of the complex. Between four and eight policemen continue to be stationed permanently at the entrance to the building.

Hu received a visit from his lawyer Li Jinsong in prison on 4 February. The lawyer said Hu showed no sign of being mistreated. His three cell-mates are non-political detainees.

Hu’s parents and his wife, Zeng Jinyan, were able to visit him on 10 February, but Zeng was not allowed to take their baby daughter. Several prison guards monitored the meeting. Zeng said Jia appeared “tired and stressed.” The prison has given him the medicine he needs.

Zeng has received permission to leave the apartment three times in the past two weeks. On two of these occasions, she took the baby to see a doctor. Each time she went out, neighbours said they saw policemen enter the apartment.

On 11 February, Zeng recovered several items previously confiscated by the police, including her mobile phone.

– Original report from Reporters Without Borders: Hu Jia allowed visit by family, surveillance of home stepped up

Posted in Activist, Beijing, China, housing, Hu Jia, Human Rights, Law, Life, News, People, Police, Politics, Social, Women, World, Zeng Jinyan | Comments Off on Police Occupied Neighbour Room To Monitor Zeng Jinyan With 4~8 Stationing At The Entrance of The Building

Reporters Without Borders Condemns China Regime On the First Day of the Chinese New Year

Posted by Author on February 8, 2008


Reporters Without Borders, 7 February 2008-

There are just six months left until the opening of the Beijing Summer Olympics. The world’s biggest sports event will get under way in the Chinese capital on 8 August. The Chinese authorities gave very specific promises in 2001 in order to win the games for Beijing. They said the holding of the games would “help improve human rights” and that there would be “total press freedom” before and during the games.

None of this has happened. About 80 journalists and Internet users are currently imprisoned in China. Some have been detained since the 1980s. The government blocks access to thousands of websites and the cyber-police watch Internet users closely. A total of 180 foreign reporters were arrested, attacked or threatened in China in 2007.

There are no grounds for claiming that the situation has improved. The number of journalists imprisoned in China in 2001 was 14. Currently there are 32 journalists and more than 50 cyber-dissidents and Internet users in prison in China. The overall number of political prisoners runs into the thousands.

The International Olympic Committee and the sponsors of the Olympic Games meanwhile remain silent, thereby discrediting the Olympic values.

We do no think it is too late to get people released. There was evidence of this just two days ago, when the Hong Kong-based journalist Ching Cheong was freed two years before completing a five-year sentence. Some journalists, many well-known figures and even the authorities in Hong Kong had long been pressing for his release.

The repression is continuing without any let-up, sidelining all those who dare to call for concrete improvements before the start of the games. Blogger Hu Jia, for example, is being held on a charge of “inciting subversion of state power” despite an international outcry. He is facing the possibility of a long prison sentence. Human rights activist Wang Guilin, who took part in a campaign with the slogan “We want human rights, not Olympic Games,” has just been sentenced to 18 months of reeducation through work in northeastern China. But IOC president Jacques Rogge keeps silent. And the Chinese government condemns attempts to politicise the games.

Families, the forgotten victims

Today, the first day of the Lunar New Year, Reporters Without Borders would like to draw attention to the wives and families of imprisoned journalists and cyber-dissidents. As well as the financial problems they must face, they are often the victims of threats and sanctions. At the moment is that of Hu Jia’s young wife, Zeng Jinyan, who is under house arrest in Beijing with their three-month-old daughter. Zeng cannot leave their apartment or communicate with the outside world. One of their friends, Yuan Weijing, the wife of imprisoned human rights lawyer Chen Guangcheng, is permanently watched by the police and by thugs recruited by the local authorities who recently threw stones at a German TV crew trying to interview her.

The wives and partners of dissidents often lose their jobs. This has been the case with the partners of cyber-dissidents Yang Zili (held since 2001) and Ouyang Yi (held from 2002 to 2004). The wife and son of the publisher Hada, imprisoned in Inner Mongolia since 1996, have been subjected to all sorts of harassment. The son, Uiles, even served a two-year prison sentence for alerting international organisations about his father, who was given a 15-year jail term. The authorities refuse to give him ID papers as long as he “continues to create problems.”

Protest in Paris

Tomorrow, on 8 February 2008, Parisians will be invited to join Reporters Without Borders in condemning repression in China. Reporters Without Borders activists will station themselves in one of Paris’ busiest districts at midday and ask passers-by to let themselves be photographed wearing the “Beijing 2008” campaign T-shirt, on which the Olympic rings have been turned into handcuffs. A video about imprisoned journalists will at the same time be shown on a large screen.

Some 30 leading European sports personalities and actors have already agreed to take part in this campaign by wearing the “Beijing 2008” T-shirt.

Reporters Without Borders hails the announcement on 28 January that Britain’s Prince Charles has decided not to attend the Beijing Olympics inauguration above all because of the violation of basic freedoms in Tibet, where free expression is even more restricted. Three Tibetans were given long prison sentences last year because of reports about repressions they had sent abroad.

More information about Reporters Without Borders’ campaign: http://www.rsf.org/rubrique.php3?id_rubrique=174

Original report from Reporters Without Borders

Posted in Activist, Asia, Beijing Olympics, Campaigns, Chen Guangcheng, China, Europe, Event, Freedom of Speech, Hu Jia, Human Rights, Life, News, People, Politics, Social, Spiritual, Sports, World, Zeng Jinyan | Comments Off on Reporters Without Borders Condemns China Regime On the First Day of the Chinese New Year

China: Well-wishers Detained Outside AIDS Activist Hu Jia’s Beijing Home

Posted by Author on January 25, 2008


Radio Free Asia, 2008.01.23-

HONG KONG–Chinese well-wishers and bloggers were detained and questioned by police standing guard outside the home of detained AIDS activist Hu Jia, reporting their experience later online.

Dozens of petitioners went to Hu Jia’s home in an eastern suburb of Beijing on Sunday, in a bid to bring baby formula to Hu’s wife Zeng Jinyan. Zeng has been held with her baby daughter under house arrest since Hu’s arrest Dec. 27 for “subverting state power.” Their internet and phone connections have been cut off.

Some of the well-wishers were taken to the Dispersion Center for petitioners from out of town, suggesting they travelled from elsewhere in China to help Zeng.

One netizen, identified online as “Little Hammer,” said he had tried to deliver baby formula to Zeng but police blocked his way, questioning him for several hours.

“How precious freedom is! But Hu Jia sacrificed his own freedom for all of us,” “Little Hammer” wrote.

Several other people reported in blog posts and forum messages that they also tried to visit Zeng, or bring milk powder to her, but apparently none succeeded.

Instead, Zeng barred police from entering her apartment Sunday, saying it was illegal to hold her and her baby under house arrest.

According to Hu’s friend, legal scholar Teng Biao, the police replied: “You are not innocent. You were involved in many of the things that Hu Jia did.”

Teng said the police appeared to be threatening Zeng also with detention, talking within earshot about allowing her home from detention to feed her baby……. (more details from Radio Free Asia)

Posted in Activist, Beijing, Blogger, China, Friend, house arrest, Hu Jia, Human Rights, Law, Life, News, People, Politics, Social, Women, World, Zeng Jinyan | Comments Off on China: Well-wishers Detained Outside AIDS Activist Hu Jia’s Beijing Home

(video) Modern China Life: AIDS Activist Hu Jia’s Family Traced and Monitord by Polices 24 Hours a Day

Posted by Author on January 25, 2008


From Youtube-

01/18, 2008: Zeng Jinyan remains trapped at home with her 2 month old baby and all communication with the outside world cut off. It is unknown whether they have anything to eat; what is known is that one blogger* sent a parcel of milk formula, but it was intercepted by police.

Prisoners in Freedom City (1)

Prisoners in Freedom City (2)

Prisoners in Freedom City (3)

Prisoners in Freedom City (4)

Prisoners in Freedom City (5)

Prisoners in Freedom City (6)

Prisoners in Freedom City (7)

– From Youtube

Posted in Activist, Asia, Beijing, Blogger, China, City resident, Family, house arrest, housing, Hu Jia, Human Rights, Law, Life, News, People, Police, Politics, Social, Video, Women, World, Zeng Jinyan | 1 Comment »

China Is Listening To Our Silence

Posted by Author on January 21, 2008


Sarah Cook, The National Post, Canada, January 18, 2008-

The fact that Time magazine named Zeng Jinyan, right, one of the world’s 100 most influential people did not help her much on Dec. 27, when 30 Chinese agents arrested her husband, prominent rights activist Hu Jia.

Security agents showed up at the couple’s Beijing apartment with a warrant for “subversion against the state,” a catch-all phrase used to lock up pretty much anyone who says something the Communist Party does not like. Despite liver problems and a two-month-old daughter, Hu now potentially faces years in prison.

He is not alone. Three months ago, one of his best friends — leading rights attorney Gao Zhisheng — met a similar fate. On Sept. 22, Gao, who like Hu had recently questioned the legitimacy of Beijing hosting the Olympic Games, was apparently taken by plainclothes police from the home he shares with his wife and two children. He has not been seen since.

To those who follow human rights in China, these may seem like common scenarios. But these two men are anything but common — they are key leaders of what is often termed China’s Rights Defence Movement, a diverse collection of lawyers, intellectuals and activists. Reaching beyond a narrow elite of dissidents, they have drawn support from large numbers of farmers and workers as they use nonviolent means to demand basic rights and challenge the Communist Party’s decades of repression.

Hu and Gao’s work has focused on different issues. Hu is an environmental and AIDS activist, while Gao has represented the gamut of China’s “have-nots,” from disabled children to coal miners to evicted tenants. As a Christian, he is particularly passionate about defending victims of religious persecution, especially house-church members and people who practise Falun Gong.

The duo’s approach for bringing change has been surprisingly bold. Besides publicly quitting the Communist Party, in February, 2006, they launched a relay hunger strike for human rights which quickly became one of the largest and most unified mobilizations in years.

Activists, farmers and workers from 29 provinces joined, as well as overseas democracy activists. Gao has received phone calls of support from sympathetic government officials.

In regular touch with activists and petitioners across the country, Hu Jia has acted as a funnel, channelling to the rest of the world how people on the ground in China actually feel.

No wonder the Communist Party fears them.

As the Olympics approach, there is a prevalent sense that the world is in for a spectacular display of anti-Communist Party demonstrations, potentially met by violent repression. Here in the West, this is often accompanied by an implied attitude of “let’s watch and see what happens,” as if we were not a party to this battle.

But we already are, certainly when these rights defenders are getting in trouble precisely for asking our help. Gao was detained in September within days of sending a letter to U.S. Congress stating the Olympics are hurting the Chinese people and should be boycotted. Hu Jia expressed similar sentiments last month when he testified via webcam at a European Parliament briefing on China.

Despite what our leaders may say, public international pressure makes a difference. It is what kept Hu and Gao out of jail for as long as they were. It is also what turned Gao’s three-year prison term in 2006 into a “suspended sentence,” which at least protected him from torture.

But the dynamic works both ways. With every arrest, Party leaders watch to see how the world will react. When there’s silence, when Western states continue to dutifully roll out the red carpet for every Chinese delegation, when abuses barely get mentioned at press conferences, then Chinese security agencies step up arrests. That is exactly what we have seen happen for the past year and a half.

And it is already playing out in Hu’s case. With no outcry from the International Olympic Committee or Western governments since his detention, his lawyers are now blocked from visiting him, placing him at greater risk of torture.

That is why the international community cannot stand on the sidelines. Silence is a stance in itself–a stance on the side of the authoritarian Communist

Party’s regime. And if Hu and Gao’s work shows anything, it is that this is not the side that tens of millions of Chinese people really want us on.

cook@freedomhouse.org. – Sarah Cook is a research assistant at Freedom House and co-editor of the English translation of Gao Zhisheng’s memoir, A China More Just.

– Original report from the National Post: Beijing is listening to our silence

Posted in Activist, Beijing, China, Family, Gao Zhisheng, Hu Jia, Human Rights, Law, Lawyer, News, People, Politics, Social, Spiritual, World, Zeng Jinyan | Comments Off on China Is Listening To Our Silence

China: One dream, One prison

Posted by Author on January 14, 2008


by Lindsey Hilsum, Channel 4, UK, 11 Jan 2008-

She’s the Chinese blogger who’s been dubbed “Tiananmen 2.0” and was selected for the TIME 100 list of heroes and pioneers. Lindsey Hilsum writes on the day she had to shout to Zeng Jinyan through a barred window.

I last saw Zeng Jinyan in December, a month after her baby was born. Jinyan is a sparrow-like woman, who looks even younger than her 24 years. She was in love.

Her mother looked on indulgently as Jinyan told my friend Bessie and me how beautiful the baby was, how perfect, how exceptional – until she giggled in embarrassment at her own enthusiasm.

We saw her again today.

She stood at the window of her fourth floor flat, behind the burglar bars, holding herZeng Jinyan and her baby sleeping daughter and shouting to us below. We couldn’t go in, because Jinyan is now under house arrest.

(photo by Channel 4)

Her slightly nerdy-looking bespectacled husband, Hu Jia, was arrested on December 27th and charged with “incitement to subvert state power,” a charge known as “counter revolution” in the bad old days.

Jinyan said the police cut her telephone line, and took her computer, mobile phone and bank card. Her mother is able to go and buy food, but they’re running out of cash. Friends who try to bring things for the baby are blocked.

For several days, the police camped in her flat – she protested and now they’re outside the door, day and night.

It’s hard to see how this couple, who seem like rather earnest and maybe naïve students, are a threat to the Chinese state. Hu Jia, who’s 33, started by campaigning for people with AIDS. Jinyan was catapulted into the spotlight in 2006, soon after their marriage, when he was first arrested.

She started a blog about her quest to find her husband and suddenly she was more famous then he. In 2006, Time magazine put her in their top 100 influential people in the world.

The Chinese government targets Hu Jia and Zeng Jinyan because they join the dots. They use the internet to express their opinion that issues like land rights and AIDS are indivisible – the fundamental problem in China is the abuse of power by the state and Communist Party officials.

The government can tolerate isolated protests, but it knows that if one angry community makes common cause with another, that could become a nation-wide movement. The only national organisation allowed in China is the Party.

The Chinese government is determined to show China in a good light during the Olympics this August. The slogan is “One World, One Dream”, the idea that China is a leader amongst civilised peoples, a full member of the community of nations.

It’s all about giving a good impression – there are campaigns to stop taxi drivers from eating garlic, and pedestrians from spitting in the street.

Earlier this week we watched Olympic hostesses being put through their paces – learning to smile showing only six to eight teeth, stand up straight (with an English grammar book on their heads) and bow while presenting a medal.

The government’s fear is that people like Hu Jia and Zeng Jinyan will spoil the party by presenting a bad image of China to the world – their solution is to lock them up.

But that will cause far more trouble. The images which will resonate around the world are not the identikit young women in immaculate uniforms learning to walk gracefully, but one young woman holding a tiny baby, shouting through the bars that they took her husband away and have imprisoned her at home.

Original report from Channel 4

Posted in Activist, Beijing, Beijing Olympics, Blogger, China, Family, house arrest, Hu Jia, Human Rights, Law, Life, News, People, Politics, Social, World, Zeng Jinyan | Comments Off on China: One dream, One prison

China Activist Hu Jia’s Lawyer Put Under House Arrest, Foreign Journalists Prevented From Visiting Wife and Daughter

Posted by Author on January 13, 2008


Reporters Without Borders, 11 January 2008-

Reporters Without Borders today accused the Chinese authorities, especially state security, of violating the new regulations for foreign journalists by preventing them from visiting the wife of detained human rights activist Hu Jia and of violating the right of Hu’s lawyers to visit their client. One of the lawyers was placed under house arrest for a few hours.

“Despite all the appeals from within China and throughout the world for Hu’s release, the government is taking an even tougher position by depriving his wife and their two-month-old daughter of their freedom,” the press freedom organisation said.

On January 10th, one of Hu’s lawyers, Li Jinsong, was placed under house arrest for a few hours in a Beijing hotel, after inviting foreign journalists to confirm that it was impossible for him to see Hu’s wife, Zeng Jinyan. He is under surveillance by the police. His other lawyer, Li Fangping, was not detained but he was strongly urged not to try to approach Zeng’s home.

Previously, the authorities prevented them from visiting Hu in prison on 4 January on the grounds that the case had been classified as a “state secret.”

The police today prevented a group of foreign journalists from entering the Beijing apartment building where Zeng, a well-known blogger, lives with the couple’s two-month-old daughter Qianci, saying it was because a “criminal investigation” was under way. After checking their passports, the police allowed the reporters to leave but made the photographers delete the photos they had taken.

On 8 January, Zeng was able to talk to some German journalists through one of the windows of her apartment. She talked about the conditions in which her husband is being held and how the police are preventing all his friends and relatives from seeing her. “The police have searched the apartment several times and have taken our computer and telephones,” she said, adding: “I am very worried about Hu Jia.”

After that conversation, the police installed a curtain to prevent Zeng from being seen from outside the apartment. More than 20 police officers are permanently stationed around her home. Zeng has been completely isolated since Hu’s arrest, when the phone lines and Internet connection were cut off.

A friend of Hu’s told Reporters Without Borders he had also been prevented from visiting Zeng at home and that police officers were subsequently stationed outside his own home. On 5 January, the police searched the home of Hu’s parents to ensure they did not have documents about his arrest that they could give to the news media.

Hu has been held since 27 December on a charge of “inciting subversion of the state.” Referring to his arrest on 3 January, a foreign ministry spokesman said: “Everyone is equal before the law and no one is above the law. We are handling this case according to the law.”

Li, the lawyer who was placed under house arrest today, was awarded the French government’s human rights prize last month. French justice minister Rachida Dati met him when she accompanied President Nicolas Sarkozy on a visit to China in November.

Fifty-seven Chinese activists and writers released an open letter on 6 January calling for Hu’s immediate release and urging the police to ensure that his health does not deteriorate while in detention. Hu has a liver ailment.

Original report from Reporters Without Borders

Posted in Activist, Beijing, Blogger, China, Dissident, Freedom of Speech, house arrest, Hu Jia, Human Rights, Journalist, Law, Lawyer, Life, News, People, Police, Politics, Social, World, Zeng Jinyan | Comments Off on China Activist Hu Jia’s Lawyer Put Under House Arrest, Foreign Journalists Prevented From Visiting Wife and Daughter

Fears For Rights As Beijing 2008 Olympics Nears

Posted by Author on January 6, 2008


By Michael Bristow, BBC News, Jan. 2, 2008, Beijing-HU Jia

A few days ago, about 30 police officers broke into the home of Chinese activist Hu Jia and took him away.

(photo at right: Hua Jia/ by BBC News)

His wife, fellow activist Zeng Jinyan, is now under house arrest. At least 10 security personnel guard her home.

Mr Hu’s arrest comes as China celebrates the start of one of its most important years in recent history.

This summer, all eyes will be on it as it plays host to the Olympic Games.

Foreign campaigners say Beijing has not fulfilled its promise to improve human rights ahead of the Olympics – a charge the Chinese government flatly denies.

But the country’s human rights record – including Mr Hu’s case – will be under scrutiny as much as its sporting endeavours.

‘Inciting subversion’

Mr Hu was arrested two days after Christmas, during the afternoon, as he sat at his computer in the dining room of his home.

When officers barged into his flat, his wife was in the bedroom, feeding their two-and-a-half-month-old baby.

According to his arrest warrant, issued by the Beijing Public Security Bureau, the 34-year-old is accused of inciting subversion.

His wife has not been told where he is being held.

Mr Hu is a well-known HIV/Aids activist who also helps publicise other human rights cases in China.

He has been arrested several times before.

On the night he was taken away, six police officers stayed at Mr Hu’s home to guard his wife, her mother and their child.

Telephone lines and internet access to the home, in an eastern Beijing suburb, have been cut off.

When the BBC visited the couple’s flat, we found Ms Zeng was being closely guarded by at least 10 public security officers.

We arrived as three of them were escorting her as she walked her baby in a shared garden next to her apartment.

After a lengthy check of our identification papers, officers finally refused to allow us to interview Ms Zeng, who also publicises Chinese human rights abuses.

Four of them then pushed the 24-year-old back towards her apartment.

“I try to be strong because I need to feed my baby, but during the first three days after my husband’s arrest I lost 2kg,” she said as she was forced away.

Still clutching her baby, she added: “I don’t know where my husband is, because I have no contact with the outside world.”

The officer in charge at the scene refused to say why Ms Zeng could not leave her home or why she could not be formally interviewed.

Redefining human rights

When China made its bid to stage this year’s Olympic Games, it said the event would lead to improvements in the country’s human rights situation.

The International Olympic Committee, which awarded Beijing the games, said it would keep a close eye on that record in the run-up to the event.

“We’ve said very clearly that we want full respect of human rights,” Olympic chief Jacques Rogge told the BBC in 2004.

But critics say the detention of Hu Jia, and his wife’s house arrest, shows China is doing little to fulfil its promise.

Some even claim the Chinese government is cracking down harder on dissenters as the Olympics approach, to prevent embarrassing demonstrations.

“As China prepares to welcome the world in 2008, it has to demonstrate that it respects human rights and the rule of law,” said Sharon Hom, executive director of Human Rights in China, in response to Mr Hu’s detention.

“Otherwise the promises made by the Chinese government to its people and the world will become increasingly meaningless.”

Beijing sidesteps complaints about human rights abuses in China partly by redefining the term.

It claims human rights have more to do with providing people with food, clothing and shelter than with freedom of speech.

Liu Jingmin, executive vice-president of the Beijing Olympics organising committee, claimed in October that the games were promoting human rights in China.

“The Olympic preparatory work is progressing concurrently with China’s development,” he said.

“In the process, the democracy and human rights of the people will be vigorously enhanced and safeguarded.”

If he could be contacted for a comment, Hu Jia would probably disagree.

BBC News

Posted in Activist, Beijing, China, Hu Jia, Human Rights, Law, Life, News, People, Politics, Social, World, Zeng Jinyan | 2 Comments »

China: Human Rights Activist Hu Jia Arrested

Posted by Author on December 30, 2007


AFP, Dec.29, 2007-

BEIJING (AFP) — Police in China have arrested prominent rights activist Hu Jia on charges of inciting subversion amid a crackdown ahead of the Beijing Olympics next year, campaigners and a rights group said Saturday.

“The police have arrested him and are accusing him of inciting subversion,” activist and Hu’s friend Liu Feiyue told AFP.

A group known as Chinese Human Rights Defenders said police forced their way into Hu’s home in Beijing on Thursday, cut off his telephone and Internet connections and took him away.

“We believe that Hu Jia was criminally detained solely because of his peaceful activities in promoting human rights,” the group said in a statement that called for his immediate and unconditional release.

Hu’s wife Zeng Jinyan, also a well known dissident, remains under house arrest with her one-month-old baby daughter, the group said. Activists said police had confiscated her mobile phone and that of Hu’s mother.

The arrest showed China was intensifying a crackdown on attempts to use the Olympics to promote human rights, Liu said, adding he himself had been under police surveillance for three months.

Rights lawyer Teng Biao told AFP that Hu’s detention was linked to his rights work ahead of the Beijing Games.

“Before the Olympics the authorities will adopt stricter measures to deal with human rights activists,” Teng said. “Without more concern from the international community, more people will be arrested.”

Hu, 34, and his wife have spent many periods under house arrest over the last few years, but have used the Internet to spotlight rights abuses across China.

In earlier years they helped to expose a government-backed blood donation drive in central China, which led to an AIDS epidemic among thousands of unsuspecting farmers.

Fellow activist Qi Zhiyong, who was crippled by a tank when the military crushed the 1989 pro-democracy protests at Tiananmen Square, said he was shocked by Hu’s arrest.

“They claim that he wrote articles that opposed the Olympics, but he never opposed the Olympics, he only wanted to expose human rights abuses,” Qi told AFP.

Hu was used to threats from the authorities but continued to defend human rights despite them, he said.

The Paris-based organisation Reporters Without Borders released a statement condemning Hu’s arrest and calling for his release.

It urged the European Union and the international community to rally to Hu’s defence so that “he does not become another victim of China’s pre-Olympics repression.”

In early December the organisation awarded Hu and Zeng a special prize for their defence of human rights in the face of government oppression ahead of the Beijing Olympics, the statement said.

Hu last contacted AFP on Thursday, when he sent an email saying that jailed activist Guo Feixiong had begun his seventh hunger strike in a prison in China’s southern Guangdong province after being beaten by guards.

Hu said in the email that he had been “under illegal house arrest by state security police” for 222 consecutive days and that there were 225 days to go to the Olympic Games.

– Original report from AFP: Chinese human rights activist arrested: rights group, campaigners

Posted in Activist, Beijing, China, Freedom of Speech, Hu Jia, Human Rights, Law, Life, News, People, Politics, Social, World, Zeng Jinyan | 3 Comments »

Chinese Dissident Couple Nominated For European Parliament Human Rights Award

Posted by Author on September 8, 2007


New Europe, Belgium, 8 September 2007-

The Greens/EFA group has decided to nominate a young Chinese dissident couple, Zeng Jinyan and Hu Jia, for this year’s coveted Sakharov prize, a European Parliament award for human rights workers.

In the context of next year’s Olympic Games in Beijing, the Greens/EFA group said it was seeking to draw attention to the human rights situation in China and what it called the continuing absence of freedom of expression.

Hu Jia is a prominent environmental and AIDS activist in China who has been imprisoned for his dissident activities. Zeng Jinyan, his wife, is a cyber activist – a dissident blogger, who has focused on the activities of the Chinese secret police among other issues.

The vote by for the shortlist of three candidates for this year’s Sakharov prize, which takes place during a joint meeting of the Foreign Affairs and Development Committees, will take place on September 24. The winner will then be selected from this shortlist by the Conference of Presidents of the political groups in October.

Leader of the Belarusian Opposition Aliaksandr Milinkevich received the 2006 Sakharov Prize. Each year, the parliament awards the Sakharov prize to exceptional people or organisations fighting against oppression, intolerance and injustice. The aim is to help them in their efforts to protect human rights, democracy and the rule of law around the world.

Milinkevich gave the 50,000 Euro that comes with the prize to the human rights NGO – the Norwegian Helsinki Committee and was selected over a competitive field of people who faced oppression and worse in the fight.

It was the second time in three years human rights workers have won the top award as their country remains under the rule of President Alexander Lukashekno, often called the last Communist dictator in Europe, and someone who coincidentally has ties to the Chinese leadership.

In 2005 the prize was shared by the Ladies in White of Cuba, Reporters Without Borders and Nigerian activist Hauwa Ibrahim, while other past winners have included Nobel Peace Prize winners Nelson Mandela of South Africa and Aung San Suu Kyi of Myanmar, who remains under house arrest despite constant pressure from the European Union and western governments, which has been ignored.

– Original report from New Europe : Chinese dissident couple nominated for Sakharov prize

Posted in Activist, China, Europe, Hu Jia, Human Rights, News, People, Social, World, Zeng Jinyan | Comments Off on Chinese Dissident Couple Nominated For European Parliament Human Rights Award

Activist’s Wife once again banned by China from travelling to Europe

Posted by Author on June 11, 2007


Reporters Without Borders, 11 June 2007, Monday-

Reporters Without Borders condemned a ban on leaving the country imposed today on blogger and free expression activist Zeng Jinyan, preventing her once again from travelling to Switzerland to attend a human rights course. Police arrested her as she prepared to board the plane and also confiscated her passport.

According to her husband, Hu Jia, the Council of State, the Ministry of Defence and the Ministry of Security had all said that Zeng Jinyan posed a threat to “national security”. He told Reuters news agency that “the fact the authorities are playing the national security card shows that in reality the government knows very well that our evidence is enough to prove that the government is violating fundamental rights”.

Another human rights activist, Yao Lifa, was yesterday prevented from leaving for Switzerland to attend the same training course. He said that the communist party wanted to avoid all “instability” ahead of the 17th Party Congress.

original report from Reporters Without Borders

Posted in Activist, Beijing, Blogger, China, Europe, Human Rights, Law, News, People, Politics, Social, Speech, Women, World, Zeng Jinyan | Comments Off on Activist’s Wife once again banned by China from travelling to Europe

Hard Facts on ‘Soft Arrests’ in China

Posted by Author on May 28, 2007


By Brad Adams, Human Rights Watch, May 25, 2007-

When 10 policemen barged into the Beijing apartment of Hu Jia and Zeng Jinyan last Friday morning and told them that they were under house arrest and prohibited from leaving the country, it was more than just the latest incident in a long-standing crackdown against human-rights activists. It was also an indication of how China intends to handle dissent between now and the Olympic games that will open in Beijing in August 2008.

Mr. Hu and Ms. Zeng, who are expecting their first child in September, are the most prominent figures of a new generation of rights activists in the mainland. They take the Chinese government’s promises at face value, insisting that provisions protecting rights in China’s constitution and laws be upheld. And they are savvy about how to put pressure on the government, aware that the Olympics provide a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to put China’s abysmal rights record under the international spotlight.

Mr. Hu started in Beijing as an HIV/AIDS activist a decade ago, and quickly came to realize that without freedoms of speech and press, China’s nascent civil society would never be a serious actor in addressing China’s many social challenges, such as its acute environmental crisis, the lack of a social safety net for the poor, and the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Mr. Hu soon became one of the primary advocates for other activists facing jail or threats, relaying information to Chinese citizens and the outside world. For this, he spent more than 200 days under house arrest last year; this followed detention for over a month the previous year — a period in which the police never informed Ms. Zeng about her husband’s whereabouts.

Ms. Zeng has also become a noted human-rights activist since her husband’s arrest. She started blogging about Mr. Hu’s disappearance and later about their 200 days under house arrest, and quickly attracted a large following. Together, they made a 31-minute documentary about their ordeal, “Prisoner of Freedom City,” which shows on camera for the first time the harassment that dissidents and critics are subjected to by state security personnel. Her blog has now been blocked in China, but is still available abroad. Recently, she was named by Time magazine as one of the World’s “100 most influential people.”

When they were placed under house arrest last Friday, Mr. Hu and Ms. Zeng were minutes from leaving for a two-month trip to Europe, where they intended to speak about the human-rights situation in the run-up to the Olympics and to screen their documentary in various national capitals. Instead, the police took Mr. Hu to the police station for four hours of interrogation, telling him that he and his wife were suspected of “harming state security” — the kind of ill-defined charges often leveled against dissenters.

Preventing government critics from traveling abroad is becoming a regular feature of China’s repressive tactics. In February, 20 mainland writers were prohibited from traveling to Hong Kong for a major conference organized by PEN, an international writers association. In March, the authorities tried to prevent 80-year old HIV/AIDS activist Dr. Gao Yaojie from going to the U.S. to receive a human rights award (they did an about face when this provoked an international outcry). In April, five rights activists from Beijing, Chongqing and Wuhan were prevented from traveling to a legal conference in Hong Kong. In these instances, as in Mr. Hu and Ms. Zeng’s case, the police provided no legal basis whatsoever for their order.

Indeed, there is no basis under Chinese law for ruanjin. Literally meaning “soft arrest,” ruanjin is imposed at the complete discretion of the police, outside of any legal procedure. Ruanjin subjects one’s daily life to the whims of the secret police. In practice it means 24-hour surveillance by unidentified and often aggressive police officers, confinement at home, and restricted and monitored telephone and Internet communications. When a foreign diplomat tried to visit Mr. Hu last year, the police sealed off the entire housing block and turned the visitor away.

Unfortunately, Mr. Hu and Ms. Zeng’s case isn’t unique. Chinese rights activists are routinely put under house arrest. It is a life in limbo: One never knows when it will come and when it will end. It can last a long time, as it has for Liu Xiaobo, the famous Beijing writer and dissident who has endured ruanjin on and off for over a decade.

Despite the large number of security officials ruanjin entails, with often dozens of law-enforcement personnel mobilized on a single person or family for months, for the Chinese authorities “soft arrest” presents several advantages over formal arrest and jailing. Putting a dissident in prison attracts greater attention and condemnation from the international community. Formal charging and jailing of activists for expressing their opinions also gives the lie to China’s promise to make improvements in the human rights situation before the Olympics. House arrest, on the other hand, attracts less notice, while still intimidating countless others.

The Olympics may be a year away, but the government’s efforts to silence critics are already in full swing. There is little reason to think the wave of arrests will slow — if anything, they’ll accelerate as opening day approaches. The international community isn’t powerless; countries participating in the Olympics, and the Olympic committee itself, can lodge protests and lobby to prevent future arrests. At the very least, no one can sit quietly when critics and human-rights defenders are silenced in this way.

Mr. Adams is Asia director at Human Rights Watch.

original from Human Rights Watch

Posted in Activist, Beijing, Blog, China, house arrest, Hu Jia, Human Rights, Law, Life, News, Opinion, People, Politics, Report, Social, Speech, World, Zeng Jinyan | 4 Comments »

China Activist Couple Travel Banned, House Arrestted Without Charges

Posted by Author on May 23, 2007


Human Rights Watch, May 21, 2007-

(New York, May 21, 2007) – The Chinese government should immediately lift the houseHu Jia and Zeng Jinyan arrest and travel restrictions imposed on Hu Jia and Zeng Jinyan (photo right), a prominent husband-and-wife team of human rights activists arrested on Friday, Human Rights Watch said today.

Hu and Zeng, two of China’s most well-known campaigners for the rights of people living with HIV/AIDS, were placed under house arrest and banned from leaving the country on May 18. During a four-hour interrogation at a Beijing police station, police told Hu that the couple was “suspected of harming state security.”

“The Chinese government ought to be grateful to Hu and Zeng for educating and assisting people living with HIV/AIDS, but instead it is punishing them,” said Brad Adams, Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “Their work isn’t a threat to national security, but the government’s attempt to stifle AIDS activists is a threat to public health.”

Minutes before the couple was to board a flight for a two-month trip to Europe, Hu and Zeng were detained by eight police officers – two of whom filmed the proceedings. The police at no point provided any official documents showing the basis for Hu and Zeng’s house arrest and travel ban.

Hu, a human rights activist who has monitored and reported on arrests and harassment of high-profile individuals, spent 214 days under house arrest between August 2006 and March 2007. The couple made a documentary film about their house arrest, “Prisoners of Freedom City,” which records their surveillance by state security and police over that seven-month period.

Last week, Time magazine named Zeng as one of the world’s 100 most influential people. Her blog documents the routine surveillance and harassment by security forces that China’s activists and dissidents must endure.

“I had never expected that the police would restrict me as well as Hu Jia,” Zeng wrote on her blog. “I am already three months pregnant. What is to be feared from me and my child?” She expressed her astonishment that the authorities would subject both her and her husband to house arrest for legally pursuing their rights of free expression and association.

In April, Hu released a transcript of a conversation he had with a prominent human rights lawyer, Gao Zhisheng, in which Gao claimed that he had been forced to “confess” under torture. Gao received a suspended sentence in December for a charge of “subversion” in a trial that fell short of international fair-trial standards.

The house arrest order confines Hu and Zeng to their home in Beijing and severely limits their freedom of movement and association, as well as their ability to contact friends and relatives.

“China’s systematic use of house arrest and state security charges against human rights defenders seriously undermines the government’s claims that it respects the rights of its citizens,” said Adams. “The Chinese government should immediately end the practice of house arrest and the use of dubious, politically motivated charges against activists.”

House arrest is just one of the many administrative measures that Chinese authorities can deploy against dissidents and human rights activists without having to formally charge and prosecute them under Chinese law. The Chinese government appears to be increasing its use of house arrest on grounds of loosely defined state security crimes as a means of quelling public expressions of dissent in the run-up to the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games.

Hu stated earlier this year that he was planning to “push the space for freedoms, especially freedom of expression,” in the period leading up to the Beijing Olympics in August 2008. But with a spate of arrests of activists, lawyers and journalists in the past two years, China is moving in the opposite direction. Despite its recent, more forceful response to the AIDS epidemic, the authorities have also repeatedly harassed AIDS activists, most recently detaining 79-year-old Dr. Gao Yaojie in February.

“With the Olympics on the horizon, Beijing should know that its actions are being closely watched by the rest of the world,” Adams said. “Is the house arrest of two internationally known activists really the image that China wants to project to the world?”

original from Human Rights Watch

Related:
China Bars Activist From UK Visit In Pre-Olympic Crackdown, May 18, 2007, Guardian Unlimited

Posted in Activist, AIDS, Beijing, Beijing Olympics, China, Hu Jia, Human Rights, Law, News, People, Politics, Social, Speech, Women, writer, Zeng Jinyan | Comments Off on China Activist Couple Travel Banned, House Arrestted Without Charges