Status of Chinese People

About China and Chinese people's living condition

  • China Organ Harvesting Report, in 19 languages

  • Torture methods used by China police

  • Censorship

  • Massive protests & riots in China

  • Top 9 Posts (In 48 hours)

  • All Topics

  • Books to Read

    1. A China More Just, Gao Zhisheng
    2.Officially Sanctioned Crime in China, He Qinglian
    3.
    Will the Boat Sink the Water? Chen Guidi, Wu Chuntao
    4.
    Losing the New China, Ethan Gutmann
    5.
    Nine Commentaries on The Communist Party, the Epochtimes
  • Did you know

    Reporters Without Borders said in it’s 2005 special report titled “Xinhua: the world’s biggest propaganda agency”, that “Xinhua remains the voice of the sole party”, “particularly during the SARS epidemic, Xinhua has for last few months been putting out news reports embarrassing to the government, but they are designed to fool the international community, since they are not published in Chinese.”
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Archive for the ‘Human Rights’ Category

China: Government’s Enforced Disappearances a Growing Threat

Posted by Author on November 12, 2011


(Hong Kong) – Enforced disappearances by the Chinese government’s security agencies have soared as a means to silence perceived dissent, Human Rights Watch said today at a news conference in Hong Kong. The government has failed to address the growing problem and is instead attempting to effectively legalize that unlawful practice through a revision to the country’s Criminal Procedure Law, Human Rights Watch said.

Under international law, a state commits an enforced disappearance when its agents take a person into custody and then deny holding the person or fail to disclose the person’s whereabouts. Family members and legal representatives are not informed of the person’s whereabouts, well-being, or legal status. “Disappeared” people are often at high risk of torture, a risk even greater when they are detained outside of formal detention facilities such as prisons and police stations.

“Despite a few weak gestures of disapproval, the Chinese government has largely ignored or tacitly approved the security agencies’ proclivity for enforced disappearance and ‘black jails,’” said Sophie Richardson, China director at Human Rights Watch. “That inaction has encouraged China’s security agencies to increasingly make enforced disappearances their tactic of choice. The proposed legal revisions are a clear indication of the government’s intentions.” Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Activist, China, Human Rights, Law, News, People, Politics, Social, World | Comments Off on China: Government’s Enforced Disappearances a Growing Threat

China “black jails” prompt fears of wider security crackdown

Posted by Author on November 10, 2011


(Reuters) – China’s campaign to stifle dissenters like artist Ai Weiwei through secret detentions could come cloaked in a thicker veneer of legality if proposed crime law changes go through, a prominent rights advocacy group said on Thursday.

China has clamped down hard on dozens of prominent critics and dissidents including human rights lawyers, bloggers and civil activists by locking them up incommunicado for weeks and even months at a time in undisclosed locations.

China’s moves to amend criminal laws next year to effectively legitimize extra-judicial detentions of people for up to six months could see a hardening of the nation’s security crackdown in the run-up to a change in leadership, Human Rights Watch said. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Human Rights, News, Politics, Social, World | Comments Off on China “black jails” prompt fears of wider security crackdown

Dalai Lama accuses China of ‘cultural genocide’

Posted by Author on November 8, 2011


The Dalai Lama has blamed the Chinese government’s policy of “cultural genocide” in his native Tibet for a wave of self-immolations that has struck restive Tibetan areas of western China this year.

At least 11 Tibetans, all of them Buddhist nuns, monks or former monks, have set themselves on fire since March to protest against Chinese rule and religious repression, according to human rights and exile groups.

The Chinese government has blamed the Dalai Lama for encouraging the self-immolations and says he and his “clique” are engaged in “disguised terrorism” and “pursuing separatism by harming people”.

At a press conference in Tokyo on Monday, the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader said Beijing’s hardline policy towards any hint of dissent among Tibetans was the real cause of the demonstrations. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, ethnic, Freedom of Belief, Human Rights, News, People, Politics, Religious, Sichuan, Social, SW China, World | Comments Off on Dalai Lama accuses China of ‘cultural genocide’

Chinese Dissident Artist Ai Weiwei Gets $2.4M ‘Tax Bill,’ Posts it to Google Plus

Posted by Author on November 2, 2011


You’ve got to love Ai Weiwei. The artist, dissident, and social media provocateur just refuses to stop tweaking the Chinese Communist Party. After posting tens of thousands of tweets deriding the Chinese leadership’s less-than-savory practices, police hauled him away for 81 days of particularly brutal jail time. As part of his release in June, he promised to make no public statements for a full year.

Two months later, Ai was back at it. Now the Chinese government appears to be trying a new approach. Authorities sent Ai a bill for “back taxes and fines” adding up to 15 million Yuan, or about $2.4 million. The bill demands payment within 15 days. The artist, never one to lose his sense of humor, posted the bill to Google Plus. Then he started talking to reporters about it.

“If it’s a tax problem, I’ll pay. But if it’s not, I won’t pay,” he told Reuters. “This whole matter is ridiculous.” Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Artists, Business, China, Human Rights, News, People, Politics, Social, World | Comments Off on Chinese Dissident Artist Ai Weiwei Gets $2.4M ‘Tax Bill,’ Posts it to Google Plus

Anger over detained Chinese activist reaches capital

Posted by Author on November 1, 2011


(Reuters) – Supporters of a blind legal activist, whose long confinement in his village in east China has sparked widespread anger, petitioned Beijing officials on Tuesday after some said they were beaten when they tried to visit the activist.

In recent months, dozens of supporters have been blocked from visiting Chen Guangcheng, who is under virtual house arrest in his home village in Linyi in eastern Shandong province.

Some of the supporters were beaten by dozens of men in plain clothes while trying to visit Chen on Sunday, and their complaints were later ignored by the local police, said Mao Hengfeng, a petitioner from Shanghai. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, East China, Human Rights, Law, News, Politics, Shandong, Social, World | Comments Off on Anger over detained Chinese activist reaches capital

The Price of Yahoo! Sale to China- Free Expression ?

Posted by Author on October 26, 2011


Yahoo, the most visited web portal in the United States, appears to be shopping for a parent company. Jack Ma, the Chairman of Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., China’s largest e-commerce company, has recently said that he is “very interested” in acquiring the U.S.-based company. Such a shake-up may be just what Yahoo is looking for as a means of reviving growth within the company, but it also raises some significant concerns over the maintenance of Yahoo’s human rights obligations as a major repository and purveyor of information on the internet and an early cautionary example of the challenges companies face when pressed by governments to provide sensitive user information.

Seven years ago, at the Chinese government’s request, Yahoo’s Hong Kong office turned over information that led to the imprisonment of  journalist Shi Tao. Yahoo sought to make amends in various ways, including adopting internal policies and joining with other internet service providers and stakeholders to promote a common, rights-based approach to government demands. Human Rights First urges that any potential  Yahoo suitor commit to upholding Yahoo’s existing policies, and its commitments as a member of the Global Network Initiative, as a starting point. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Business, China, Company, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, News, Politics, Social, Technology, World, Yahoo | Comments Off on The Price of Yahoo! Sale to China- Free Expression ?

Support Growing for Blind Chinese Rights Activist Chen Guangcheng

Posted by Author on October 26, 2011


News about blind Chinese human rights activist Chen Guangcheng continues to trouble Chinese and international society.

Chen and his family have been under tight house arrest in their home in Dongshigu Village, Linyi County, Shandong Province since his release from prison over a year ago, with his young daughter Kesi prevented from attending school.

According to information on Twitter, authorities have finally allowed the child to attend a nearby elementary school as a result of public pressure and international attention.

At the same time, troubling rumors have surfaced in the village in early October that Chen may be dead.

An insider, who did not wish to be named, said that the “Free Guangcheng” movement on the Internet, and worldwide attention of Chen’s high profile case, have forced authorities in Linyi to allow Chen’s daughter to attend school. Under the escort of a guard, Kesi went to school on Oct. 16. Authorities also set up a temporary wooden shack at the school entrance to watch her.

He Peirong, a person concerned with Chen’s case, said she was glad about the decision to let Kesi go to school but hoped that the child will have a normal life and will not keep being escorted to and from school. She also hoped that authorities will openly report on Chen’s condition, his medical status and diet, and details about his daughter’s schooling.

Zeng Jinyan, wife of Hu Jia, an environmental and AIDS activist, said on Twitter that it was inappropriate and dangerous for a little girl to be escorted to school by a guard instead of her parent. Zeng referred to the daughter of missing attorney Gao Zhisheng, who was also escorted to and from school by police and suffered much humiliation. This created severe long-lasting mental problem for the girl.

In January and June, He Peirong visited Chen’s family in Dongshigu Village. She had her car smashed, was kidnapped and robbed.

Beginning Sept. 18, many other people, including some reporters, went to Dongshigu Village in groups. They were intercepted, beaten, and robbed.

These people wrote about their experiences on blogs and Twitter and gradually caught the public’s attention. Now there are many Chen supporters, include scholars, writers, businessmen, artists, and college students, according to He.

Meanwhile, Voice of America (VOA) reported on Oct. 5 that some villagers said Chen is already dead. Several media have picked up the news. VOA is attempting to verify Chen’s status.

Reggie Littlejohn, President of Women’s Rights Without Frontiers said in an Oct. 7 press release: “If Chen is dead, then the Chinese Communist Party is fully responsible for killing him through torture, denial of medical treatment and slow starvation. If Chen is alive, we urgently demand that he and his family be released immediately and unconditionally, for medical evaluation and treatment.”

Women’s Rights Without Frontiers and China Aid Association, among others, are leading an international effort to free Chen.

Chen, a self-taught lawyer and Nobel Peace Prize nominee, exposed the systematic use of forced abortion and involuntary sterilization as part of China’s One Child Policy. In August 2006, he was sentenced to four years and three months in prison where he was subjected to torture. After his release on Sept. 9, 2010, his family has been under house arrest that included beatings of Chen and his wife.

Time Magazine named Chen in its “2006 Top 100 People Who Shape Our World,” under the category of “Heroes and Pioneers.”

-Source: The Epochtimes

Posted in Activist, Chen Guangcheng, China, East China, Human Rights, News, People, Politics, Shandong, Social, World | Comments Off on Support Growing for Blind Chinese Rights Activist Chen Guangcheng

Chinese Artist Ai Weiwei Announced as Art World’s Most Powerful Figure

Posted by Author on October 13, 2011


The dissident Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, who shot to worldwide prominence this April when he was imprisoned by the Chinese authorities for 81 days for what were described as “economic crimes”, has been named the most powerful figure in the art world by Art Review magazine in its annual art “power 100 list”.

Mark Rappolt, editor of the magazine, said that Ai – who was No 13 on the list last year – had reminded the art world of its wider political role, as an agent of protest outside the sometimes inward-looking domain of galleries and museums.

“His activism has been a reminder of how art can reach out to a bigger audience and connect with the real world,” he said. “Institutions, while they are really important, can be great tombs.” Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Artists, China, Human Rights, News, People, Politics, World | Comments Off on Chinese Artist Ai Weiwei Announced as Art World’s Most Powerful Figure

Chinese Lawyers Teng Biao, Jiang Tianyong Named Democracy Prize Recipients

Posted by Author on September 6, 2011


Two Chinese rights lawyers are being recognized for their work, but they’re not expected to travel overseas to receive their award. Lawyers Jiang Tianyong and Tengbiao are winners of this year’s Prize for Outstanding Democracy Activist, given by the U.S.-based China Democracy Education Foundation, or CDEF.

The award, which dates back to 1986, was announced at the beginning of this month. It recognizes individuals who have contributed towards democracy and human rights in China. CDEF President Lin Muchen says both lawyers have demonstrated this through their careers, despite tough conditions.

[Lin Muchen, President of China Democracy Education Foundation]:
“Although the communist regime suppresses them, they have not given up and have persisted in doing their work. As scholars, this kind of courageous spirit is precious. So I really feel they fully deserve the award.” Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Human Rights, Lawyer, News, People, Social, World | 2 Comments »

Activist: Child of Chinese lawyer Chen Guangcheng denied education

Posted by Author on September 6, 2011


BEIJING — A rights activist says the 6-year-old daughter of a blind Chinese dissident has been barred from leaving her house and is unable to attend school.

He Peirong says the daughter of Chen Guangcheng and his wife has not been allowed to leave their house since Feb. 24 and her books have been taken away.

He said Tuesday that Chen’s daughter has not been allowed to attend school since it began last week. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Children, China, East China, Human Rights, Lawyer, News, People, Politics, Shandong, Social, World | Comments Off on Activist: Child of Chinese lawyer Chen Guangcheng denied education

Group Says It Has New Evidence of Cisco’s Human Rights Abuse in China

Posted by Author on September 4, 2011


SAN FRANCISCO — An advocacy group that accuses Cisco Systems of aiding the Chinese government in monitoring and apprehending members of the banned Falun Gong organization said Friday that it had new evidence to suggest that Cisco specifically tailored its technology for that purpose.

The Human Rights Law Foundation, based in Washington, sued Cisco, a California-based manufacturer of networking equipment, last May in the Federal District Court in San Jose, under a statute that allows American companies to be sued for violations of human rights abroad. The suit accused Cisco of having helped China build a firewall, known widely as the Golden Shield, to censor the Internet and keep tabs on dissidents. Cisco at the time said it had made nothing special for China.

On Friday afternoon, the group amended its original complaint, saying it had evidence showing that Cisco customized its products specifically to help Beijing go after members of the religious group Falun Gong. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Business, censorship, China, Economy, Human Rights, Internet, Law, News, Politics, Social, Technology, World | Comments Off on Group Says It Has New Evidence of Cisco’s Human Rights Abuse in China

China censors Ai Weiwei’s Newsweek essay

Posted by Author on September 2, 2011


BEIJING(AFP) — Chinese censors have removed an essay by Ai Weiwei in which the dissident artist strongly criticises the country’s government and justice system from the latest issue of Newsweek magazine.

The article, Ai’s first for a foreign publication since he was released from detention earlier this year, had been ripped from copies of the September 5 issue seen by AFP on a newsstand in Beijing.

In the essay Ai, 54, whose artworks have been displayed around the world, said his ordeal in police custody made him realise he was only a number in an anonymous system where “they deny us basic rights”. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Artists, censorship, China, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, News, People, Politics | Comments Off on China censors Ai Weiwei’s Newsweek essay

Writer Lü Gengsong Released from Prison, refuses Conditions of Deprivation of Political Rights

Posted by Author on August 25, 2011


(HRIC) – Writer Lü Gengsong (吕耿松) was released from the Xijiao Prison in Hangzhou on August 23, 2011, after serving a four-year sentence following a conviction for “inciting subversion of state power.” Lü is also subject to one year of deprivation of political rights following his release, which includes prohibitions on publishing and accepting interviews.

According to an informed source, after his release, when officials in Lü’s Neighborhood Committee asked him to sign a guarantee that he would abide by the conditions of deprivation of political rights, Lü refused to sign. In addition, he tore up his copy of a document specifying the terms of his “community correction” (社区矫正), correctional measures that should not have been applied to him. The source also said that the Xijiao Prison administration has not returned to Lü the six diaries he kept in prison and the manuscript of a book he wrote.

Lü is the author of the History of Corruption in the Communist Party of China (中共贪官污吏), published in 2000, and many articles on topics including corruption, organized crime, and freedom of religion. Lü was detained on August 24, 2007, on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power” and “leaking state secrets” and convicted on the first count on February 5, 2008. In ruling against Lü, the court cited 19 articles which he posted on overseas websites and a total of 470 words from those articles as evidence of his crime. In total, Lu wrote more than 226 articles and more than one million words. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, Journalist, News, World, writer | 1 Comment »

13 American scholars barred from traveling to China for their book on Xinjiang

Posted by Author on August 20, 2011


(washingtonpost)- Thirteen American scholars say they have been barred from traveling to China because of a book they wrote, an incident that raises awkward questions about academic freedom at a time of unprecedented collaboration between U.S. and Chinese universities.

The academics have taken to calling themselves the Xin­jiang 13 to emphasize their shared misfortune. Seven years ago, they assembled a book about Xinjiang, a vast region of western China that has a large Muslim population and an occasionally violent separatist movement.

They say their book triggered a backlash from the Chinese government because of its sensitive topic. Contributors have repeatedly been refused visas, thwarted from returning to the region that is the focus of their careers. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in censorship, China, Human Rights, News, NW China, People, Politics, USA, World, writer, Xinjiang | Comments Off on 13 American scholars barred from traveling to China for their book on Xinjiang

Chinese magazine president and editor punished for citing historian

Posted by Author on August 20, 2011


New York, August 19, 2011 (CPJ)–The demotion of a magazine president and suspension of an editor for an interview deemed critical of a Communist Party legend are the latest punitive steps taken by authorities against mainstream journalists in China, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

Chen Zhong, president of the Guangzhou-based biweekly Nanfeng Chuang (Window on the South), was removed from his post, though not dismissed, and editor Zhao Lingmin was suspended during an internal meeting on Monday, international news reports said. These measures were related to Zhao’s July 25 interview with Taiwanese historian Tang Chi-hua, according to a letter the editor wrote to his colleagues that was published online by the Hong Kong University-based China Media Project. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in censorship, China, Freedom of Speech, Guangdong, Guangzhou, Human Rights, Journalist, Magazine, Media, News, People, Politics, SE China, World | Comments Off on Chinese magazine president and editor punished for citing historian

Force-disappeared Lawyer Gao Zhisheng’s Probation Ends, Family Wants Him Home

Posted by Author on August 16, 2011


(Epochtimes)- Prominent Chinese human rights lawyer Gao Zhisheng’s five-year probation period ended on Aug. 14, and his family wants him to come home alive.

Gao has been missing for 16 months since a brief public appearance in April 2010, after which he was again taken into extralegal custody by Chinese authorities; they told Gao’s family little more than that he has “gone missing.” He had been in detention, with no legal procedures, for a year before that short-lived reappearance. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Gao Zhisheng, Human Rights, Law, Lawyer, News, People, World | Comments Off on Force-disappeared Lawyer Gao Zhisheng’s Probation Ends, Family Wants Him Home

Brother of missing Chinese lawyer Gao Zhisheng appeals for news

Posted by Author on August 16, 2011


(Guardian)- The brother of missing Chinese human rights lawyer Gao Zhisheng has issued a plea for news of his whereabouts, and believes that he remains in extra-judicial detention despite recently ending a five-year probationary period.

Gao is among China’s most prominent dissidents and his case may be among the human rights issues raised by the US vice-president, Joe Biden, who arrives in China on Wednesday.

A rights advocate who tackled many causes anathema to the ruling Communist party, Gao was sentenced to three years in jail in 2006 for “inciting subversion of state power”, a charge often used to punish critics of one-party rule. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Gao Zhisheng, Human Rights, Law, Lawyer, News, People, World | Comments Off on Brother of missing Chinese lawyer Gao Zhisheng appeals for news

Group calls for release of detained Chinese human rights lawyer Gao Zhisheng at end of probation period

Posted by Author on August 14, 2011


(ChristianToday)- The missing Christian human rights lawyer Gao Zhisheng’s 2006 probationary sentence for “subversion of state power” is due to expire on 14 August. He has not been heard from for almost 18 months and repeated inquiries to the Chinese authorities have not been met with a response.

Gao Zhisheng was sentenced three years’ imprisonment and five years’ probation in 2006. In a letter to Gao, published by China Aid, his wife Geng He wrote, “This August 14 is the last day of the probation period and should be the date when you regain freedom. I am looking forward to this day and to hearing your voice and to our family being reunited. The whole family looks forward to this day!” Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Gao Zhisheng, Human Rights, Law, Lawyer, News, People, Politics, Social, World | Comments Off on Group calls for release of detained Chinese human rights lawyer Gao Zhisheng at end of probation period

Chinese internet activist Wang Lihong faces up to five years in prison for ‘creating a disturbance’

Posted by Author on August 12, 2011


(Guardian)– Protesters gathered outside a Beijing court on Friday as a Chinese internet activist went on trial in a case the demonstrators see as a warning shot to other rights campaigners.

Wang Lihong faces up to five years in prison for “creating a disturbance”. She was detained in March amid a sweeping crackdown on the rights movement, apparently triggered by government fears of protests inspired by the Arab spring. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Activist, Beijing, China, Freedom of Speech, Human Rights, Law, News, People, Politics, Social, World | Comments Off on Chinese internet activist Wang Lihong faces up to five years in prison for ‘creating a disturbance’

Conditions of Chinese Artist Ai Weiwei’s Detention Emerge

Posted by Author on August 12, 2011


HONG KONG (NY Times) — Ai Weiwei, a prominent Chinese artist and dissident, said on Friday that he had been kept in a tiny room throughout his nearly three-month detention last spring and watched 24 hours a day by shifts of two uniformed military police sergeants who never left his side.

During a brief telephone interview, Mr. Ai confirmed and elaborated on a description of his captivity provided by an associate. The sergeants were never more than 30 inches from his side, and sometimes just four inches away, and stayed there as he slept, showered and used the bathroom, Mr. Ai said. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Artists, China, Human Rights, Law, News, People, Politics, Social, World | Comments Off on Conditions of Chinese Artist Ai Weiwei’s Detention Emerge

Details emerge of Chinese artist Ai Weiwei’s detention

Posted by Author on August 11, 2011


(BBC)- Chinese artist Ai Weiwei believed he was “close to death” during the more than 80 days he was held in a secret police detention centre, a source close to the artist told the BBC.

Beijing has banned him from speaking to the press since his release.

The source said Mr Ai was hooded when detained, kept under watch with guards inside his cell and subjected to treatment designed to break him.

Mr Ai was detained on charges of tax fraud by the Chinese authorities. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Artists, China, Human Rights, Law, News, People, Politics, World | Comments Off on Details emerge of Chinese artist Ai Weiwei’s detention

Five Unspoken Rules of China’s Legal System

Posted by Author on August 11, 2011


To the outside world, the Chinese regime purports to have a functioning legal system, buttressed by the rule of law, but to anyone who has tried to function within that system, the experience is much the opposite.

Canadian Lawyer Clive Ansley, a Mandarin-speaker and specialist in Chinese law, recounted in a previous article for The Epoch Times the tale of a Canadian judge who visited China. When the judge returned, he told 300 trial lawyers how the Chinese judicial system was “so far ahead of us” because the courthouse he visited was decked out in marble and plasma TV screens. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Human Rights, Law, News, Social, World | Comments Off on Five Unspoken Rules of China’s Legal System

During 81 days in secretive detention, Chinese artist Ai Weiwei was interrogated mainly on “Jasmine Revolution” protests: source

Posted by Author on August 10, 2011


(Reuters) – Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei, whose disappearance in April caused an international outcry, endured intense psychological pressure during 81 days in secretive detention and still faces the threat of prison for alleged subversion, a source familiar with the events told Reuters.

In the first broad account of Ai’s treatment in detention since he was released in June, the source, who declined to be identified fearing retribution, said the 54-year-old artist was interrogated more than 50 times by police, while he was held in two secret locations.

The questioning focused on his purported role in the planned Arab-inspired “Jasmine Revolution” protests in China in February and his writings that could constitute subversion, said the source. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Artists, China, Human Rights, News, People, Politics, World | Comments Off on During 81 days in secretive detention, Chinese artist Ai Weiwei was interrogated mainly on “Jasmine Revolution” protests: source