Status of Chinese People

About China and Chinese people's living condition

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  • Books to Read

    1. A China More Just, Gao Zhisheng
    2.Officially Sanctioned Crime in China, He Qinglian
    3.
    Will the Boat Sink the Water? Chen Guidi, Wu Chuntao
    4.
    Losing the New China, Ethan Gutmann
    5.
    Nine Commentaries on The Communist Party, the Epochtimes
  • Did you know

    Reporters Without Borders said in it’s 2005 special report titled “Xinhua: the world’s biggest propaganda agency”, that “Xinhua remains the voice of the sole party”, “particularly during the SARS epidemic, Xinhua has for last few months been putting out news reports embarrassing to the government, but they are designed to fool the international community, since they are not published in Chinese.”
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Archive for the ‘Guangdong’ Category

Chinese Policeman Appeals 14-Year Sentence over call for democracy; Lawyer Silenced by Court

Posted by Author on February 9, 2013


Sources told Human Rights in China (HRIC) that during the three-hour appeals hearing on February 7, 2013 that ended without a ruling, the Shenzhen Municipal Intermediate People’s Court repeatedly interrupted the lawyers for Shenzhen police officer Wang Dengchao (王登朝), who was sentenced to 14 years in prison on “embezzlement” and “obstructing official business.” Wang, 38, has maintained that these charges were trumped-up.

Wang’s wife, Li Yangting (李彥婷), who attended the hearing, said, “Wang said in court, ‘I did not embezzle even one cent. I demand an open and fair hearing of my case, so that everyone can see clearly whether I have committed crimes. I would accept even the death penalty if I could have an open and fair hearing.’” Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Guangdong, Law, People, Police, Politics, SE China, Shenzhen, Social, World | Comments Off on Chinese Policeman Appeals 14-Year Sentence over call for democracy; Lawyer Silenced by Court

China’s Guangdong Province Announces Intention to End Forced Labor System

Posted by Author on February 1, 2013


Following earlier reports this month that China would discontinue its forced labor system, Guangdong Province, sometimes called Xi Jinping’s vanguard of reform, announced Monday that it would end the reeducation through labor system within the year.

Yan Zhichan, director of Guangdong’s Department of Justice, said on Jan. 28 that Guangdong has made preparations and will stop the reeducation through labor system this year after the national reform plan is passed by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress in March. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Guangdong, Human Rights, Labor camp, Politics, SE China, World | Comments Off on China’s Guangdong Province Announces Intention to End Forced Labor System

Southern China Shaxi Riots Escalates, Police Crackdown Ordered, 30 Died

Posted by Author on June 30, 2012


Security forces in southern Guangdong province have reportedly been cleared to use deadly force in an escalating riot in Shaxi township.

Hong Kong’s Apple Daily reports that paramilitary forces and police are to stop the riots and demonstrations that began this Monday with guns if necessary.

Migrant workers are clashing with local residents. The riots began after the son of a migrant worker was beaten by security officials after getting into a fight with a local boy. Riots have been escalating as workers from nearby towns converge in Shaxi. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Guangdong, News, People, Protest, Riot, Rural, SE China, Social, Worker, World | Comments Off on Southern China Shaxi Riots Escalates, Police Crackdown Ordered, 30 Died

Chinese villagers demand return of illegally seized land

Posted by Author on November 23, 2011


Thousands of villagers angry that officials failed to address their grievances after riots two months ago marched to a government office in southern China to demand the return of land they say was illegally seized, witnesses and media said.

The protest came after a series of strikes in factories in Guangdong province, China’s economic powerhouse.

Rural land disputes are increasing and spreading to the undeveloped west of the country, according to a poll published in October in a magazine run by Xinhua news agency.

One witness identifying himself by his surname Yang said by phone that 4,000 villagers and farmers from Wukan surrounded government offices in Lufeng City on Monday. The protesters denounced local officials as greedy and corrupt. They dispersed after an hour without incident. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Guangdong, Life, News, People, SE China, Social, World | Comments Off on Chinese villagers demand return of illegally seized land

Chinese magazine president and editor punished for citing historian

Posted by Author on August 20, 2011


New York, August 19, 2011 (CPJ)–The demotion of a magazine president and suspension of an editor for an interview deemed critical of a Communist Party legend are the latest punitive steps taken by authorities against mainstream journalists in China, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

Chen Zhong, president of the Guangzhou-based biweekly Nanfeng Chuang (Window on the South), was removed from his post, though not dismissed, and editor Zhao Lingmin was suspended during an internal meeting on Monday, international news reports said. These measures were related to Zhao’s July 25 interview with Taiwanese historian Tang Chi-hua, according to a letter the editor wrote to his colleagues that was published online by the Hong Kong University-based China Media Project. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in censorship, China, Freedom of Speech, Guangdong, Guangzhou, Human Rights, Journalist, Magazine, Media, News, People, Politics, SE China, World | Comments Off on Chinese magazine president and editor punished for citing historian

Chinese Lawyer hits out at China trial for Australian businessman

Posted by Author on August 10, 2011


(The Age)- AUSTRALIAN businessman Matthew Ng broke down in a Chinese court yesterday as he told how police had promised they would let him go if he handed over control of his multimillion-dollar company.

Mr Ng’s dramatic testimony corroborates claims by shareholders and supporters that his arrest was a ”shakedown” by Guangzhou’s most powerful state-owned company, Lingnan, along with a corrupt police force, procurator and court.

Mr Ng was taken by seven plain-clothes police from the basement of his home, in front of his wife and five-year-old daughter, in November last year just days after acrimonious commercial negotiations with Lingnan executives. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Australia, Business, Businessman, China, Economy, Guangdong, Law, News, People, Politics, SE China, Social, World | Comments Off on Chinese Lawyer hits out at China trial for Australian businessman

Chinese Lawyer Zhu Yubiao Imprisoned for Defending Falun Gong

Posted by Author on July 29, 2011


On July 13, the Chinese regime sentenced a Guangzhou based lawyer, Zhu Yubiao, to two years in prison for defending members of Falun Gong—a spiritual practice the regime has been persecuting since 1999. He was charged with so-called “sabotaging law enforcement.”

Zhu was arrested last August. Authorities ransacked his home and allegedly found Falun Gong books and CD-ROMs. He was formally charged in September and secretly put on trial in May this year.

This isn’t the first time Zhu has found himself on the wrong side of the Chinese regime for defending Falun Gong. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Guangdong, Guangzhou, Human Rights, Law, Lawyer, News, People, Politics, SE China, Social, World | Comments Off on Chinese Lawyer Zhu Yubiao Imprisoned for Defending Falun Gong

Riot in south China after officials beat to death a disabled fruit vendor

Posted by Author on July 27, 2011


(Reuters) – Angry residents in a southern Chinese city went on the rampage after officials apparently beat to death a disabled fruit vendor, a state media said on Wednesday, in the latest incident of social unrest in the world’s second-largest economy.

The China Daily said that thousands of people gathered on the streets of Anshun in Guizhou province on Tuesday afternoon, throwing stones at police and overturning a government vehicle.

The riot was sparked after urban management officers — a quasi-police force that enforces laws against begging and other petty offences — were suspected of beating the vendor to death, the newspaper said. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, City resident, Guangdong, Guangzhou, Incident, News, People, Protest, SE China, Social, World | Comments Off on Riot in south China after officials beat to death a disabled fruit vendor

Three Chinese journalists held in China’s crackdown on activists

Posted by Author on May 8, 2011


Three Chinese journalists have been detained or harassed by police in recent days amid a nationwide crackdown on activists and political dissent.

Guangdong-based journalist Wang Sijing was forcibly detained by Wuhan police after she traveled there to cover a story about psychiatric hospital inmates, she told Twitter users.

Wang, who writes for the 21st Century Economic Report, was released after her mobile phone was confiscated, but declined to comment on Friday. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Freedom of Speech, Guangdong, Human Rights, Journalist, News, People, Politics, SE China, World, writer | Comments Off on Three Chinese journalists held in China’s crackdown on activists

China Tests New Political Model in Shenzhen

Posted by Author on October 18, 2010


Wall Street Journal, Oct. 18, 2010 –

SHENZHEN, China— An experiment with political reform in Shenzhen, the city where China pioneered its economic opening, sheds light on an ideological debate playing out within the Communist Party as it holds an annual meeting in Beijing that will help to chart China’s political future.

In this former fishing village adjacent to Hong Kong, the party that has maintained an absolute monopoly on government since 1949 is taking small but significant steps to cede responsibility for social problems to independent civic organizations.

After more than six decades of stifling dissent—sometimes by force—the party is also using Shenzhen to test ways of strengthening public oversight of local government to root out corruption that the party itself admits has become the greatest threat to its grip on power.

It is a far cry from Western-style multiparty democracy, but this experiment—branded “small government, big society”—is seen by some leaders as a way to forge a new political model that maintains authoritarian rule while responding to the needs of an increasingly complex society……(more details from Wall Street Journal)

Posted in China, News, Politics, SE China, Shenzhen, Social, World | Comments Off on China Tests New Political Model in Shenzhen

Foxconn accused of exploiting workers in China: survey

Posted by Author on October 9, 2010


SHANGHAI — IT firm Foxconn faces renewed pressure over conditions at its factories after state media said Friday it had been accused of forcing staff in China to work excessive overtime while exploiting interns.

The results of a survey of employees at Foxconn come just months after a spate of suicides at the Taiwan company’s plants in China, including 10 at its Shenzhen facility which employs an estimated 400,000 workers.

Researchers questioned 1,736 workers at plants in nine cities and found they worked an average 83.2 hours overtime a month, more than twice the maximum 36 hours allowed under Chinese law, the China Business News said. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Business, China, Company, Guangdong, Law, Life, News, People, SE China, Social, Worker, World | Comments Off on Foxconn accused of exploiting workers in China: survey

Police release Chinese author after online storm

Posted by Author on October 1, 2010


(Reuters) – Police in southern China have released on bail the author of a popular Internet novel they deemed pornographic, state media said, following an on-line uproar about official abuse of power.

Chinese language teacher Yuan Lei, 29, published “In Dongguan” on the popular portal tianya.com between August 2009 and February of this year, Xinhua news agency said late Thursday. The novel was about prostitution in bathhouses in Dongguan.

The booming manufacturing hub in Guangdong province, close to Hong Kong, has long had a reputation for its racy nightlife and anything-goes attitude. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Culture, Guangdong, News, People, Politics, SE China, Social, World, writer | Comments Off on Police release Chinese author after online storm

Deaths in Guangdong Dam Collapse much higher than offcial number

Posted by Author on September 24, 2010


Radio Free Asia, Sep. 24, 2010 –

HONG KONG—Residents near a waste management dam in the southern Chinese province of Guangdong said several dozen households were swamped when the dam collapsed during a typhoon earlier this week, with more deaths than officials would admit to.

“This is really bad,” said a resident of the area near the Yinyan Tin Mine in Guangdong’s Xinyi city. “The houses have totally collapsed. Between one and two hundred people may have died.”

Official media reports said five people died in the collapse of the dam, which was operated by the Hong Kong-listed Zijin Mining Group, in the wake of torrential rain and mud and rock slides caused by typhoon Fanapi last week.

A further six people were listed as missing and seven were injured, reports said.

But local people said the number of casualties was likely much higher. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, disaster, Flood, Guangdong, Incident, News, SE China, World | Comments Off on Deaths in Guangdong Dam Collapse much higher than offcial number

Hong Kong Businesspeople’s Recent Published Magazine Confiscated by Authorities in South China

Posted by Author on September 22, 2010


Radio Free Asia, Sep. 21, 2010-

HONG KONG— Authorities in the southern Chinese boom town of Shenzhen have confiscated the entire first issue of a recently launched magazine which details the dangers of investing in the mainland, according to the publication’s disgruntled co-founder.

Xue Baoren, who has campaigned for the rights of investors in mainland China since a legal dispute with Shenzhen officials over a factory he leased, said the printing operations of Investments and Pitfalls magazine has been moved to his hometown of Hong Kong, where it will be distributed free of charge.

“I had the magazine printed [in May] at a factory in Shenzhen, and then I had planned to have it shipped to Hong Kong,” Xue said. “It was supposed to arrive on Aug. 27 but it was confiscated by the authorities in Shenzhen.” Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Asia, Business, Businessman, censorship, China, Guangdong, Hong kong, Human Rights, Investment, News, People, Politics, SE China, Shenzhen, Social, Speech, World | Comments Off on Hong Kong Businesspeople’s Recent Published Magazine Confiscated by Authorities in South China

Leave Your Name When Buying a Knife Before Asia Games in China Guangzhou

Posted by Author on September 18, 2010


By Lin Hsin-Yi, Epoch Times Staff, Sep. 18, 2010 –

Two months out from the 2010 Asia Games in Guangzhou, the capital of the Guangdong Province in south China, the city’s Public Security Bureau has laid down a new law which citizens say is as irksome as it will be ineffectual: that is, everyone who buys knives or similar instruments from now until the end of the Games will have to provide at least six pieces of personal information.

Like during other mass events organized by the authorities, before November 12 when the Games begin there will be frequent inspection points around the city with often onerous demands on passers-through, the prohibition of balloons, kites, sky lanterns and carrier pigeons, and a regime of stiff fines for incompliants.

The Guangzhou police announced the measures on August 21, titled “Notice to Enforce Safe Knife Management in Guangzhou.” It goes for cleavers, large fruit knives, craft knives, files, and ceramic knives; only approved vendors can sell them, and buyers need to yield their name, address, ID number, types of knives, number purchased, and intended use. The policy has currently been put into effect in a few districts. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Event, Guangdong, Guangzhou, Life, News, Politics, SE China, Social, World | Comments Off on Leave Your Name When Buying a Knife Before Asia Games in China Guangzhou

Probe launched after 200 China pilots falsified records: govt

Posted by Author on September 6, 2010


By Robert Saiget (AFP) – Sep. 5,2010 –

BEIJING — China said Monday it was investigating its commercial pilots’ qualifications amid revelations more than 200 of them lied on their resumes.

The probe comes after 42 people died on August 24 when a Brazilian-made jet flown by Henan Airlines crashed at a small airport in northeastern China’s Heilongjiang province.

Fifty-four passengers and crew survived the crash, in which the plane missed the runway, sparking speculation that pilot error was to blame.

The investigation into qualifications was launched by the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC), the country’s aviation regulator, the central government’s news website said.

Between 2008 and 2009, the resumes of more than 200 Chinese commercial pilots were found to have been falsified, the report said, with some of them embellishing their flying histories.

At least half of the pilots worked for Shenzhen Airlines, which owns Henan Airlines…….(more details from AFP)

Posted in Central China, China, Henan, News, People, SE China, Shenzhen, Social, World | Comments Off on Probe launched after 200 China pilots falsified records: govt

Thousand protesters gather in south China city to protect Cantonese language

Posted by Author on July 25, 2010


Tania Branigan, The Guardian, July 25, 2010 –

A Chinese “culture war” has spilled onto the streets of a southern city as hundreds of inhabitants held an unusual mass rally to defend their local language.

Proposals for Guangdong’s main television company to broadcast primarily in Mandarin – China’s official language – have angered citizens in the province, who fear that Cantonese is being sidelined.

Some worry that Cantonese, which is also spoken in some other parts of the mainland, Hong Kong and Macau, is on its way to extinction. According to the official People’s Daily newspaper, it is the first language for half of the 14 million residents of the provincial capital Guangzhou, while the other half speak mainly Mandarin.

Up to a thousand protesters gathered in the centre of Guangzhou shouting slogans, before police dispersed them peacefully. A witness said most were in their twenties, although some were middle-aged.

The controversy broke out when the local committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference – a political advisory body – urged authorities to ensure that Mandarin, which is spoken across the country, is used on Guangzhou TV’s main shows. It said the move would promote unity and help tourists and athletes who will arrive in the city for the Asian Games this November.

Although the network has said it will continue to broadcast in both languages, residents fear that Cantonese is being squeezed out and could ultimately be dropped completely. They argue there are already plenty of Mandarin channels for people to watch and say that a decline in the use of the language will also erode the area’s cultural heritage.

In a poll on the committee’s own website, 80% of the 30,000 respondents said Guangzhou TV stations should broadcast in Cantonese…….(more details from The Guardian)

Posted in China, Event, Guangdong, Guangzhou, Life, News, SE China, Social, World | Comments Off on Thousand protesters gather in south China city to protect Cantonese language

Deadly Accident at South China Amusement Park Causes 6 Died and 10 Injured

Posted by Author on July 5, 2010


The Wall Street Journal, July 5, 2010 –

A deadly accident at a Chinese amusement park last week has spawned a mystery that officials are still trying to unravel.

The accident happened on Space Journey, a ride at Ecoventure Valley of Overseas Chinese Town in Shenzhen. The rise is designed to simulate the experience of a rocket launch, including acceleration twice that of gravity.

Normally, under a dome 24 meters in diameter built to suggest the vast expanse of the universe, Space Journey’s 40-some passengers spin and bob in four-person carts.

But last Tuesday, something went horribly wrong, leading to the deaths of six people on the ride and injuries to 10 others.

“This is the first time in my over three decades working in this field that I have ever encountered such a mass-casualty accident,” said Bi Jianbin, vice chairman of the China Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions. It was a “huge shock” to experts, Bi said.

Neither officials nor the company that own the ride, Shenzhen Overseas Chinese Town Holding Co., have offered a clear explanation for what happened. The local government held a press conference at which the park apologized for the accident. A public relations official at the company says the incident is “under investigation, so we have nothing to say.”

In the absence of an explanation, Chinese media have quoted sometimes inconsistent eyewitness accounts. One witness said there was an explosion. Another smelled something burning.

Some unconfirmed reports say one of the ride’s carts broke off and fell to the ground, killing its passengers. Several reports cite a break in the ride’s power as the accident’s source. There is even a video circulating on the Internet that offers a hypothetical simulation of the disaster.

Bi says the accident couldn’t have been caused by a power outage. Even if the power went out, as occasionally happens on rides, it wouldn’t have caused the kind of damage that appears to have occurred on Space Journey.

The ride had only been open to the public for a little over a year, since May 1, 2009. Because the machinery for the ride was special equipment, it was tested and certified as safe by the China Special Equipment Inspection and Research Institute…….(more details from The Wall Street Journal)

Posted in China, Entertainment, Guangdong, Incident, Life, News, SE China, Shenzhen, Social, World | Comments Off on Deadly Accident at South China Amusement Park Causes 6 Died and 10 Injured

China auto parts plant halts production due to strike from Monday

Posted by Author on June 22, 2010


June 22 (Reuters) – Japan’s Denso Corp (6902.T), a car parts maker affiliated with Toyota Motor Corp (7203.T), said on Tuesday its joint venture plant in Guangzhou, China has halted production since Monday morning due to a labour strike.

The plant, Denso (Guangzhou Nansha) Co Ltd, has also halted supply of its fuel injection equipment and other products to Toyota, Honda Motor Co (7267.T) and other carmaker clients since Monday, Denso spokeswoman Yoko Suga said.

The management and workers of the joint venture are currently negotiating on the workers’ demand for higher wages and better benefits, she said. (Reporting by Yumiko Nishitani)

Reuters

Posted in Asia, Business, China, Company, Event, Guangdong, Guangzhou, News, People, Protest, SE China, Social, Worker, World | Comments Off on China auto parts plant halts production due to strike from Monday

Leak of nuclear plant in southern China: Officials are criticized for cover up

Posted by Author on June 15, 2010


Radio Free Asia, 2010-06-15 –

HONG KONG— The Daya Bay nuclear power plant in southern China had a “very small leakage” from a fuel rod that has been contained, Hong Kong’s leading electricity supplier, CLP Holdings Ltd., said in a statement, but activists say the firm should have revealed the incident sooner.

A “small increase” in radioactive substances was detected in cooling water at the plant’s Unit 2 on May 23, CLP said in a statement. “The reactor cooling water is sealed in completely and isolated from the external environment, thus causing no impact to the public.”

Operations at the power plant were unaffected and a task force of nuclear experts had been formed to investigate the situation, CLP said.

Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station is located about 50 kms (30 miles) from the center of Hong Kong.

The Hong Kong Security Bureau also said a fuel rod at the Guangdong Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station experienced a “very small leakage” that increased radioactivity levels slightly in the nuclear reactor’s cooling water on May 23, said in a statement.

The leak was “completely quarantined and, therefore, had no impact on the public,” the bureau said.
Chairman of Hong Kong’s Safety Advisory Committee Raymond Ho Chung Tai said in an interview Tuesday that the danger to the public is negligible.

“This is only a minor incident. If we report such a minor incident, it will only trigger public panic,” he said.

But party opposition members and experts were not as dismissive.

Cover up?

Albert Lai, vice chairman of Hong Kong’s Civic Party who has closely watched the development of the Daya Bay nuclear plant for more than a decade, urged the government and CLP to explain why the public was not informed about the incident until it was first reported by the media.

“[The members of the Hong Kong Safety Committee] should play a surveillance role and report to the Hong Kong government. If they are reporting their findings to the government, why didn’t the government report them to the public?” Lai questioned.

“This incident happened two weeks ago and obviously someone tried to cover it up.”

Members of the Hong Kong Democratic Party said they will pursue the matter with the government, while members of the pro-China Democratic People’s Party protested Tuesday in front of CLP headquarters on Hong Kong Island to express their anger over the cover-up.

Wan Sek Luen Laurie, managing director of Enviro-Chem Engineering Laboratory Co. Ltd, and member of the Daya Nuclear Power Station Nuclear Safety Advisory Committee, said CLP is misleading the public.

He said the statement the company issued that “the level of radioactivity has stabilized over the last two weeks since [the event], without material change” indicates that the fuel rod is still leaking.

“Neutrons cannot be totally sealed. It can go through walls and even the earth. It is the question of the degree of enrichment…Of course, some concrete walls can absorb radiation, but some of are leaking [to the surrounding air] already,” Wan Sek Luen Laurie said.

“It can be said that some of the workers in the plant have been exposed to different levels of radiation. The fuel, when it makes contact with air, becomes uranium hydride, which can detonate in room temperature. It is very dangerous.”

Kok Wai Cheah, a professor at Hong Kong Baptist University said that though the fuel rod may only release a very small amount of radiation, the plant should follow international operating procedures by shutting down and replacing the rod.

“The crack [in the fuel rod] may be very small. But if the crack grows larger, the level of radiation will be higher. That means radiation within the reinforced concrete structure will also be higher. If anyone makes contact with it, their health will be in serious danger,” Kok Wai Cheah said.

Cheah warned that if the leaking radiation makes contact with the third external layer of concrete containment, it will endanger the lives of the public.

Citizens uninformed

Local citizens appear to be uninformed of the potential hazards to their health.

A resident in O-lang village near Daya Bay said people there knew very little about the leakage.

“We can sometimes find information online. Otherwise, we know nothing about the incident,” the resident said.

The International Atomic Developmental Authority said in an email that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has seen media accounts reporting the detection of radioactivity in the cooling water at Daya Bay nuclear power plant’s Unit 2 reactor.

But the IAEA said it had received no official notification of the incident, nor did it expect to if the incident was as minor as news reports suggested.

The Daya Bay plant opened in 1994 to wide criticism because of its proximity to Hong Kong’s city center. More than 1 million people signed a petition opposing the plant during its construction.

Radio Free Asia

Posted in Africa, China, Guangdong, Health, Hong kong, Life, News, Nuclear, Official, People, Politics, SE China, Shenzhen, Social, World | 1 Comment »

Honda to Halt Production at Two South China Plants Over Strike

Posted by Author on June 9, 2010


By Takako Iwatani

June 9 (Bloomberg) — Honda Motor Co., Japan’s second- biggest automaker, said it will halt production at two car factories in China today as workers at a plant partly owned by affiliate Yutaka Giken Co. walked out demanding higher pay.

Honda doesn’t yet know whether the factories in Guangzhou, Guangdong province will resume operations tomorrow, Tokyo-based spokesman Yoshiyuki Kuroda said. Employees at Foshan Fengfu Autoparts Co. in Foshan, Guangdong, began the strike on June 7, forcing Yutaka Giken to close the factory, spokesman Kazuhito Anma said. A Xinhua News Agency report that the strike has ended is incorrect, he said.

Honda, which operates four car-assembly plants in China, agreed last month to raise pay by 24 percent to end a walkout at a wholly owned parts supplier in Foshan that halted its auto production in the nation for more than a week. Demands for higher wages are fast becoming an issue in China and companies need to get used to it, said Jun Ma, an economist at Deutsche Bank AG.

”To keep good workers, the company has to raise pay,” said Koji Endo, a Tokyo-based analyst at Advanced Research Japan. There is a labor shortage in Guangzhou because companies including Honda, Toyota Motor Corp. and Nissan Motor Co. have expanded factories there, Endo said……. (more details from the Bloomberg)

Posted in Business, China, Company, Guangdong, Life, News, People, SE China, Social, Worker, World | Comments Off on Honda to Halt Production at Two South China Plants Over Strike

Foxconn Implements Second Pay Raise to Stop Suicides

Posted by Author on June 7, 2010


By: Brian Heater, PC Magazine, 06.07.2010 –

Twelve workers from Foxconn’s southern China plant have committed suicide this year. The plant manufactures the iPhone, among other products. Steve Jobs addressed the issue last week during a talk at the D8 conference in California, calling it “troubling,” but he added that the plant “is not a sweatshop.”

Last week, the company announced that it will raise pay rates 30 percent across the board, in light of the spate of suicides. This week, Foxconn announced it will issue a 66 percent performance-based raise for employees who get good marks on a three-month evaluation.

“This wage increase has been instituted to safeguard the dignity of workers, accelerate economic transformation, support Foxconn’s long-term objective of continued evolution from a manufacturing leader to a technology leader, and to rally and sustain the best of our workforce,” Foxconn’s founder Terry Gou said in a statement.

PC Magazine

Posted in Business, China, Company, Guangdong, Life, News, SE China, Shenzhen, Social, Worker, World | Comments Off on Foxconn Implements Second Pay Raise to Stop Suicides

Dark side of China electronic surge: 3 lessons to learn

Posted by Author on June 1, 2010


Leo Lewis, The Australian, May 31, 2010 –

LIKE laws and sausages, consumer electronics have joined the list of things best not to see being made. Behind our shiny iPhone or cutely-packaged Nintendo games console is a process that reeks of exploitation, drudgery and, as we can now see, despair.

The spate of suicides at Foxconn’s plant in Shenzhen has provided an alarming education and raises a perfectly timed red flag over the US-China currency debate. China has been forced to acknowledge that the real story behind its growth figures is, in many cases, a degrading one.

There are three important practical lessons to be drawn from the deaths. The first is places like Foxconn must, sadly, exist if we want cheap electronics.

The punishing hours, the 350,000 employees squeezed into one vast complex, the pseudo-military discipline, the mind-numbing silence of the shop floor, these are all things that we can deplore, but which belong on the conscience of anyone who has ever made a call from a mobile phone, sent an e-mail or snapped a friend on a digital camera. Which is to say, all of us.

The glitzy myth of electronics has also been punctured: Foxconn exists because electronics manufacturing is no longer the work of artisan specialists. This company has done to technology what McDonald’s did to lunch.

The second lesson is that Foxconn represents the China that Beijing would prefer the country not to be. From the outside, the country looks export-led – one of the main reasons that China’s failure to allow its currency to rise against the dollar has drawn so much condemnation in Washington. The reality is rather different, and Foxconn usefully demonstrates why.

Take the 30-gigabyte iPod, one of the many Apple devices that depend on Foxconn. When it first went on sale in the US, it sold in the stores for $US299. It left the factory in China with a value of $150, but only $7.50 of that value was actually created in China. The remainder belonged to the other Asian countries (Japan, Taiwan) where the components were made.

According to analysis by CLSA Securities, globally, workers received $1.06 billion in earnings from iPod-related jobs, or about $25 per iPod sold. Chinese workers received only about 2 per cent of the global pay cheque, or 55c per unit sold. As it looks to its future, China desperately wants to be Apple, not Foxconn.

But the third and most critical lesson of Foxconn is that significant parts of the US rhetoric on China’s currency policy are misguided. The Obama administration is under relentless domestic pressure to “do something” about the undervalued Chinese currency, the yuan, and to prod China into letting it rise. Attention has turned to the timing of Washington’s decision to officially label China a “currency manipulator”, a meaningless slur given that 50 countries around the world peg their currencies to the US dollar.

Beijing, knowing that its economy is primarily driven by domestic investment, is probably keen for the yuan to appreciate but will not allow itself to appear bullied into doing so. But Foxconn kicks away one of the main struts of those angrily demanding that Beijing allow the yuan to rise: many of those manufacturing jobs that China is supposedly stealing from the US are not jobs that Americans could countenance doing themselves.

An attempt to run a plant like Foxconn in the US would be disastrous and that is why the jobs were outsourced there in the first place. Even if the yuan rose by 40 per cent against the dollar, it is hard to imagine mass-market electronics assembly jobs moving back to the US.

The currency scuffle between Washington and Beijing is in a lull, but could flare-up again at any moment: When it does, America must look at Foxconn for a sense of how the trade world really works.

Via The Australian

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