Status of Chinese People

About China and Chinese people's living condition

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  • Books to Read

    1. A China More Just, Gao Zhisheng
    2.Officially Sanctioned Crime in China, He Qinglian
    3.
    Will the Boat Sink the Water? Chen Guidi, Wu Chuntao
    4.
    Losing the New China, Ethan Gutmann
    5.
    Nine Commentaries on The Communist Party, the Epochtimes
  • Did you know

    Reporters Without Borders said in it’s 2005 special report titled “Xinhua: the world’s biggest propaganda agency”, that “Xinhua remains the voice of the sole party”, “particularly during the SARS epidemic, Xinhua has for last few months been putting out news reports embarrassing to the government, but they are designed to fool the international community, since they are not published in Chinese.”
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Archive for the ‘Gansu’ Category

Redundant workers protect homes with gas and pesticide in Northwest China

Posted by Author on October 4, 2010


SOH News,Oct. 3, 2010 –

Authorities in Gansu Province have seized a paper mill and are moving to seize surrounding lands. In Zhenyuan County, 400 mill workers were driven out of their homes. Two workers were interviewed by SOH, one of them Mr Liu said the remaining residents were arming themselves with pesticide and gasoline to defend themselves against government officials.

The mill occupies 58,000 square metres of land. It was built over 40 years ago and has fixed assets worth tens of millions of Yuan and cash assets worth 13 million Yuan (AUD$2 million). The local authorities became interested in the property and took control of it. The mill was forced into bankruptcy by the authorities. The company name was changed to the ‘Jiahe Beer Packaging Factory of Qingyang’. The accounts and books were then prepared under the name of a separate company. Tens of millions of dollars of assets were then embezzled. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in China, Gansu, Human Rights, Law, Life, News, NW China, Official, People, Politics, Social, Worker, World | Comments Off on Redundant workers protect homes with gas and pesticide in Northwest China

Over 2,000 Dead Or Missing In Giant Northwest China Landslide

Posted by Author on August 8, 2010


“Then on Sunday a huge landslide in Northern China wiped out a village. Over 2,000 villagers are missing and 127 confirmed dead, according to China Daily.” –from businessinsider.com

images come from a CCTV video-- Zhouqu, Gansu Province, China

images come from a CCTV video-- Zhouqu, Gansu Province, China

Posted in China, disaster, Flood, Gansu, News, NW China, Photo, Social, World | Comments Off on Over 2,000 Dead Or Missing In Giant Northwest China Landslide

Two Tibetan Student writers arrested by 16 armed policemen at Northwest China University

Posted by Author on April 10, 2010


Reporters Without Borders, 9 April 2010 –

Reporters Without Borders
condemns the detention of two young Tibetan writers who are studying in Lanzhou, in the northwestern province of Gansu. Identified as Tashi Rabten (pen-name Therang) and Druklo (pen-name Shokjang), they were arrested on 4 April, apparently because of what they have written about the situation in Tibet.

“We fear that these two young Tibetan writers will be mistreated during their first few weeks in detention,” Reporters Without Borders. “We urge the authorities in Gansu province to provide information about what is happening to them. And if their arrests are linked to their writing, we call for their release.”

Tashi Rabten and Druklo were arrested when 16 armed policemen raided their hostel at the Northwest National Minorities University, where they are students. The police searched their rooms, confiscating books in Tibetan, their mobile phones, their laptops and their course material.

Tashi Rabten was the editor of a book in Tibetan called Trakyig (Blood Letter) about the March 2008 unrest in Tibet. Published in January 2009, its sale was stopped by the Chinese authorities because of its “suspicious” political content, and the security forces seized copies already distributed. Thereafter they were kept under surveillance and Tashi Rabten was briefly arrested in July 2009.

“If the government continues to violate our freedom of expression, freedom of assembly, freedom of thought and our private lives, we are surely going to protest,” a student representative at the university told a Tibetan journalist based abroad.

The Reporters Without Borders

Posted in China, Freedom of Speech, Gansu, Human Rights, Lanzhou, Law, News, NW China, People, Politics, Social, Student, Tibetan, World | Comments Off on Two Tibetan Student writers arrested by 16 armed policemen at Northwest China University

Up to 190,000 may have died as a result of China’s weapons tests

Posted by Author on April 20, 2009


Michael Sheridan, Times Online, April 19, 2009 –

The nuclear test grounds in the wastes of the Gobi desert have fallen silent but veterans of those lonely places are speaking out for the first time about the terrible price exacted by China’s zealous pursuit of the atomic bomb.

They talk of picking up radioactive debris with their bare hands, of sluicing down bombers that had flown through mushroom clouds, of soldiers dying before their time of strange and rare diseases, and children born with mysterious cancers.

These were the men and women of Unit 8023, a special detachment charged with conducting atomic tests at Lop Nur in Xinjiang province, a place of utter desolation and – until now – complete secrecy.

“I was a member of Unit 8023 for 23 years,” said one old soldier in an interview. “My job was to go into the blast zone to retrieve test objects and monitoring equipment after the explosion.

“When my daughter was born she was diagnosed with a huge tumour on her spinal cord. The doctors blame nuclear fallout. She’s had two major operations and has lived a life of indescribable hardship. And all we get from the government is 130 yuan [£13] a month.”

Hardship and risk counted for little when China was determined to join the nuclear club at any cost.

Soldiers galloped on horseback towards mushroom clouds, with only gas masks for protection.

Scientists jumped for joy, waving their little red books of Maoist thought, while atomic debris boiled in the sky.

Engineers even replicated a full-scale Beijing subway station beneath the sands of the Gobi to test who might survive a Sino-Soviet armageddon.

New research suggests the Chinese nuclear tests from 1964 to 1996 claimed more lives than those of any other nation. Professor Jun Takada, a Japanese physicist, has calculated that up to 1.48m people were exposed to fallout and 190,000 of them may have died from diseases linked to radiation.

“Nuclear sands” – a mixture of dust and fission products – were blown by prevailing winds from Lop Nur towards towns and villages along the ancient Silk Road from China to the West.

The victims included Chinese, Uighur Muslims and Tibetans, who lived in these remote regions. Takada found deformed children as far away as Kazakhstan. No independent scientific study has ever been published inside China.

It is the voices of the Chinese veterans, however, that will reso-nate loudest in a nation proud of its nuclear status but ill informed about the costs. One group has boldly published letters to the state council and the central military commission – the two highest government and military bodies – demanding compensation.

“Most of us are between 50 and 70 and in bad health,” they said. “We did the most hazardous job of all, retrieving debris from the missile tests.

“We were only 10 kilometres [six miles] from the blast. We entered the zone many times with no protective suits, only goggles and gas masks. Afterwards, we just washed ourselves down with plain water.”

A woman veteran of Unit 8023 described in an interview how her hair had fallen out. She had lost weight, suffered chronic insomnia and had episodes of confusion.

“Between 1993 and 1996 the government speeded up the test programme, so I assisted at 10 underground explosions,” she said. “We had to go into the test zone to check highly radioactive instruments. Now I’m too sick to work – will the government help me?”

The price was paid by more than one generation. “My father was in Unit 8023 from 1967 to 1979, when his job was to wash down aircraft that had flown through the mushroom clouds,” said a 37-year-old man.

“I’ve been disabled by chronic immune system diseases all my life and my brother’s daughter was born with a heart defect,” he said. “Our family has spent thousands of yuan on operations over the decades. Two and three generations of our family have such illnesses – was it the nuclear tests? Does our government plan any compensation?”

In fact, the government has already responded to pressure from veterans’ groups. Last year Li Xueju, the minister of civil affairs, let slip that the state had started to pay “subsidies” to nuclear test personnel but gave no details of the amounts.

Such is the legacy of the decision by Chairman Mao Tse-tung, in 1955, to build the bomb in order to make China a great power.

Mao was driven by fear of the US and rivalry with the Soviet Union. He coveted the might that would be bestowed by nuclear weapons on a poor agricultural nation. Celebrations greeted the first test explosion on October 16, 1964.

The scientists staged a total of 46 tests around the Lop Nur site, 1,500 miles west of Beijing. Of these tests, 23 were in the atmosphere, 22 underground and one failed. They included thermonuclear blasts, neutron bombs and an atomic bomb covertly tested for Pakistan on May 26, 1990.

One device, dropped from an aircraft on November 17, 1976, was 320 times more powerful than the bomb that destroyed Hiroshima.

The last explosion in the air was in 1980, but the last underground test was not until July 29, 1996. Later that year, China signed the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty and, once again, only the sigh of the winds could be heard in the desolation of the Gobi desert.

The financial cost remains secret, but the price of the first bomb was roughly equal to more than a third of the entire state budget for 1957 – spending that went on while at least 30m Chinese peasants died of famine and the nuclear scientists themselves lived on hardship rations.

Rare was the outsider who gained a glimpse of this huge project. One was Danny Stillman, director of technical intelligence at Los Alamos, New Mexico, home of America’s nuclear weapons. He made 10 visits to secret Chinese nuclear facilities during a period of detente and information exchange from 1990 to 2001.

“Some of the videos they showed me were of PLA [People’s Liberation Army] soldiers riding on horses – with gas masks over the noses and mouths of both the horses and the soldiers – as they were riding towards the mushroom cloud of an atmospheric surface detonation,” Stillman recalled.

“It was strange because the soldiers had swords raised above their heads as they headed for the radioactive fallout. I have always wondered how many of them survived.”

Stillman was also allowed to see the lengths to which the Chinese scientists had gone to experiment with annihilation in the desert.

Like the Americans, the Chinese placed caged live animals, tanks, planes, vehicles and buildings around test sites. Such were the remains gathered by the men and women of Unit 8302.

“The surprise to me was that they also had a full-scale Beijing subway station with all supporting utilities constructed at an undefined depth directly underneath,” said Stillman.

“There were 10,000 animals and a model of a Yangtze River bridge,” recalled Wu Qian, a scientist.

Li Yi, a woman doctor, added: “Animals placed two kilometres from the blast centre were burnt to cinders and those eight kilometres away died within a few days.”

China had borrowed Soviet blueprints and spied on the West, according to The Nuclear Express, a book by Stillman and Thomas Reed, the former US air force secretary.

It explains how China then exploited its human capital to win technological parity with the US for just 4% of the effort – 45 successful test explosions against more than 1,000 American tests.

“The Chinese nuclear weapon scientists I met . . . were exceptionally brilliant,” Stillman said.

Of China’s top 10 pioneers, two were educated at Edinburgh University – Cheng Kaijia, director of the weapons laboratory, and Peng Huan-wu, designer of the first thermonuclear bomb. Six went to college in the United States, one in France and one in Germany.

For all this array of genius, no Chinese scientist has dared to publish a study of the human toll.

That taboo has been broken by Takada, a physicist at the faculty of medicine at Sapporo University, who is an adviser on radiation hazards to the government of Japan.

He developed a computer simulation model, based on fieldwork at Soviet test sites in Kazakhstan, to calculate that 1.48m people were exposed to contamination during 32 years of Chinese tests.

Takada used internationally recognised radiation dosage measurements to estimate that 190,000 have died of cancer or leukaemia. He believes 35,000 foetuses were deformed or miscarried, with cases found as far away as Makanchi, near the Kazakh border with China.

To put his findings in perspective, Takada said China’s three biggest tests alone generated 4m times more radioactivity than the Chernobyl reactor accident of 1986. He has called the clouds of fallout “an air tsunami”.

Despite the pall of silence inside China, two remarkable proofs of the damage to health have come from official Communist party documents, dated 2007 and available on provincial websites.

One is a request to the health ministry from peasants’ and workers’ delegates in Xinjiang province for a special hospital to be built to cope with large numbers of patients who were “exposed to radiation or who wandered into the test zones by mistake”.

The other records a call by a party delegate named Xingfu for compensation and a study of “the severe situation of radiation sickness” in the county of Xiaobei, outside the oasis town of Dunhuang.

Both claims were rejected. Residents of Xiaobei report an alarming number of cancer deaths and children born with cleft palates, bone deformities and scoliosis, a curvature of the spine.

Specialists at hospitals in three cities along the Silk Road all reported a disproportionate number of cancer and leukaemia cases.

“I have read the Japanese professor’s work on the internet and I think it is credible,” said one. No cancer statistics for the region are made public.

Some memories, though, remain indelible. One man in Dunhuang recalled climbing up a mountain-side to watch a great pillar of dust swirl in from the desert.

“For days we were ordered to keep our windows closed and stay inside,” recounted another middle-aged man. “For months we couldn’t eat vegetables or fruits. Then after a while they didn’t bother with that any more.”

But they did go on testing. And the truth about the toll may never be known unless, one day, a future Chinese government allows pathologists to search for the answers in the cemeteries of the Silk Road.

The dead of Dunhuang lie in a waste ground on the fringe of the desert, at the foot of great dunes where tourists ride on camels. Tombs, cairns and unmarked heaps of earth dot the boundless sands.

By local tradition, the clothes of the deceased are thrown away at their funerals. Dresses, suits and children’s garments lie half-buried by dust around the graves.

“People don’t live long around here,” said a local man who led me to the graveyard. “Fifty, 60 – then they’re gone.”

– Timesonline.co.uk : Revolt stirs among China’s nuclear ghosts

Posted in China, Gansu, Health, Life, military, News, Ningxia, NW China, People, Politics, Qinghai, Rural, Social, Soldier, World, Xinjiang | Comments Off on Up to 190,000 may have died as a result of China’s weapons tests

(photos) Police beating villagers in northwest China protest

Posted by Author on November 23, 2008


From secretchina.com –

China police beating villagers (1) (from secretchina.com)

China police beating villagers (1) (from secretchina.com)

China police beating villagers (2) (from secretchina.com)

China police beating villagers (2) (from secretchina.com)

China police beating villagers (3) (from secretchina.com)

China police beating villagers (3) (from secretchina.com)

China police beating villagers (4) (from secretchina.com)

China police beating villagers (4) (from secretchina.com)

China police beating villagers (5) (from secretchina.com)

China police beating villagers (5) (from secretchina.com)

China police beating villagers (6) (from secretchina.com)

China police beating villagers (6) (from secretchina.com)

China police beating villagers (7) (from secretchina.com)

China police beating villagers (7) (from secretchina.com)

Posted in China, Gansu, Incident, Law, News, NW China, People, Photo, Politics, Protest, Recommended posts, Riot, Rural, Social, World | Comments Off on (photos) Police beating villagers in northwest China protest

China orders evening curfew and street closure to curb unrest after new riots

Posted by Author on November 21, 2008


By Ian Ransom, Reuters, Wednesday, November 19, 2008 –

BEIJING (Reuters) – China has told police to ensure stability amid the global financial crisis, while thousands of people attacked police and government offices in a northwestern city in unrest triggered by a plan to resettle residents.

After decades of solid economic growth, China is battling an unknown as falling demand for its products triggers factory closures, sparks protests and raises fears of popular unrest.

Rioting involving thousands of people exploded on Monday in Wudu, in Gansu province’s poverty-stricken region of Longnan, where 1.8 million people were made homeless by the May 12 Sichuan earthquake.

The unrest, which flared up again on Tuesday, saw rioters invade local government offices, loot equipment and torch police cars, though the incident appeared to be related to a local dispute rather than the slowing economy.

The Longnan rioting follows a number of strikes by taxi drivers and labor protests in the country’s major export regions, where thousands of factories have closed in recent months, prompting fears the global financial crisis could stir wider popular unrest.

Public Security Minister Meng Jianzhu said police “should be fully aware of the challenge brought by the global financial crisis and try their best to maintain social stability,” according to the China Daily.

State media said the riots were triggered by a scheme to move the government headquarters to a neighboring county, which would force local residents to relocate, and had prompted fears from some residents about future housing and livelihoods.

Youtube footage showed police struggling to restore order while being pelted with stones. Pictures on Chinese web portals showed columns of armed riot police sheltering beneath shields.

An uneasy calm had fallen on Wudu on Wednesday, after authorities ordered an evening curfew and closed major streets and local businesses, according to local residents, who said heavy-handed police had inflamed the riots.

“No one’s rioting today, the streets are all closed … People will be snatched if they go out after 10 p.m. at night, so no-one dares to go out,” a hotel worker who declined to leave his name told Reuters by telephone.

“Actually, there were only a few thousand petitioners, but police fired tear gas which made women and children sick. This made the others angry,” he said. …… (more from Reuters: China seeks to curb unrest after new riots)

Posted in China, Economy, Forced Evictions, Gansu, housing, Incident, Land Seizure, Law, Life, News, NW China, People, Politics, Protest, Riot, Rural, Social, World | Comments Off on China orders evening curfew and street closure to curb unrest after new riots

100 people arrested in Northwest China after riot over land dispute

Posted by Author on November 20, 2008


Radio Free Asia, 2008-11-19 –

HONG KONG—Police in the northwestern Chinese province of Gansu have arrested more than 100 people after thousands of farmers fought with police in the midst of protests over a land dispute.

“One hundred seventeen people were arrested at the scene [Tuesday] but no one was arrested today,” an officer at the Longnan city police bureau said in an interview. He also said some 200 police had been mobilized to bring the situation under control.

Witnesses said armed police were guarding government buildings, and local hospitals were treating an unknown number of people injured in the clashes.

The Longnan city Web site said police had used force to disperse the crowd as a last resort after protesters attacked police and officials with stones, steel pipes, and bricks, and set fire to motorcycles, bicycles, and buildings.

The official statement put the size of the crowd at 1,000 but numerous witnesses said it was many times that number.

A resident surnamed Zhou said he had seen about a dozen vehicles transporting armed police to the area, who then searched and arrested more than 100 people.

A farmer, also surnamed Zhou, said shops in Wu Du district were closed for a second day on Wednesday.

“When I went out to the street this morning, all the shops were closed. There were six or seven farmers walking by the street, and then suddenly the police were beating them up and taking them away,” she said.

“Very few pedestrians are walking on the street. It’s like a ghost town,” she said, adding that police were checking identification papers of anyone trying to travel to neighboring areas.

Police deployed

After farmers from Dongjiang township gathered around local Communist Party headquarters for a second day, authorities deployed Longnan city police to quell crowds angered by the compensation they were offered for their land.

Witnesses said police used batons and tear-gas to quell the riot, in which the city Web site said farmers attacked officials and set fire to property.

Another farmer surnamed Zhou who took part in the protest said demonstrators were angered over their treatment by police removing them from a building site on Nov. 17, prompting a larger crowd to return the next day……. (more details from Radio Free Asia)

Posted in China, Economy, Forced Evictions, Gansu, housing, Human Rights, Incident, Land Seizure, Law, Life, News, NW China, People, Politics, Protest, Riot, Rural, Social, World | 1 Comment »

Thousands of Protestors Overrun Communist Office in Northwest China

Posted by Author on November 18, 2008


By Samuel Spencer, Epoch Times Staff, Nov 18, 2008 –

People watch armed police from the side of the street. (The Epoch Times)

People watch armed police from the side of the street. (The Epoch Times)

Between 2,000 and 10,000 people protested and attacked a Communist Party office in Gansu province of Northwest China early Tuesday. 60 people were reported to have been hurt in the protests.

The numbers of protestors varied in reports —state-run media reported 2,000 protestors, and various online blogs reported that close to 10,000 people had been protesting.

The riots are believed to have occurred due to the regime’s decision to move its offices at the city of Longnan to another city. One blog reported that the move had resulted in the termination of housing construction for thousands of families who had been affected in the Sichuan earthquake. The May earthquake killed 275 people in Longnan and destroyed many houses.

State-run media reported that 30 residents had gathered on Monday to protest the reallocation of the office, but that the number had quickly grown.

The violence is only the latest of numerous angry protests that have broken out against the ruling Chinese Communist Party.

In recent weeks, numerous protests by disgruntled taxi drivers have broken out across the country, especially in Chongqing. The taxi driver protests were prompted by what many believe to be collusion between the regime and fleet owners to let taxi drivers bear the brunt of the fallout from low fares and rising costs.

In June, 30,000 people rioted outside the Party office in Guizhou province, setting fire to government vehicles after a local girl’s death. The death of the 15-year-old girl, who had been raped and murdered, was widely rumored to have been covered up by police and government officials.

The Chinese Communist Party has often used a growing economy to offset questions about its human rights records and its iron-fisted rule, but the recent economic downturn is now testing the limits of how far free expression can go under the Communist regime.

The Epochtimes

Posted in China, corruption, Forced Evictions, Gansu, housing, Human Rights, Incident, Land Seizure, Law, Life, News, NW China, People, Politics, Protest, Riot, Rural, Social, World | Comments Off on Thousands of Protestors Overrun Communist Office in Northwest China

(photos) Special color cloud on sky in west China before earthquake

Posted by Author on May 13, 2008


Photos from Internet-

color cloud in Baoji City, may 12, 2008

Above: photo shot at 13:34 on May 12, 2008, just one hour before the earthquake, in Baoji City, Shaanxi province, west China, close to Xichuan province. (Posted on Netease website.)

Above: Shot at 13:11 on May. 12, 2008 in Mei Xian County, Shaanxi province, west China, close to Xichuan province. (Posted on Netease website)

cloud in Tianshui, Gansu province

Above: Shot in Tianshui City, Gansu province, Northwest China. (posted on Tianshui Online website)

Posted in China, disaster, earthquake, Gansu, News, NW China, Photo, Shaanxi | 2 Comments »

Protests Spread From Tibet to Western China, Many Shot to Deaths

Posted by Author on March 18, 2008


Radio Free Asia, 2008.03.16-

KATHMANDU— Violence spread from Tibet through neighboring parts of China on Sunday as anti-Chinese protesters took to the streets in Sichuan, Gansu, and Qinghai provinces, with large crowds of Tibetans marching on government buildings.

In the Ngaba [in Chinese, Aba] prefecture of Gansu province, witnesses reported clashes near Kirti monastery and deaths from gunfire. “Just now eight bodies have arrived in Kirti monastery,” an eyewitness inside the monastery said in an interview.

Another Tibetan who joined the Ngaba protests reported seeing Tibetans killed by gunfire from inside a police post after the Tibetans attacked police buildings.

“Four Tibetans were killed by gunfire while they were marching near Kirti monastery… Then a little later, another three were killed. They were shot from a distance. Before they were shot, the protesters had smashed the windows at two police posts,” the protester said. “There looked like 5,000 to 6,000 protesters….The names of the three people killed later are Tsezin, Norbu, and Lobsang Tashi.”

Many remote areas of the Sichuan, Gansu, and Qinghai plateau are home to large Tibetan populations, many of whom are nomads.

Tibetans in Ngaba confirmed the reports of clashes to RFA’s Mandarin service: “The reports you have heard are all true. This is all happening. Some things that have happened I can’t talk about because it is not convenient.”

Another Tibetan living nearby also confirmed reports of protests in Ngaba, saying they were still going on late Sunday.

Repeated calls to the Ngaba prefecture police headquarters and local government offices met busy signals. An employee at the county hospital declined to comment on the reports of casualties. “We don’t know. We don’t know right now,” the employee said.

In Gansu, Tibetan students at Lanzhou’s Northwest National University staged a peaceful demonstration on the university grounds.

“Hundreds of Tibetan students took part, and Tibetan students from other departments tried to join in but were blocked. They declared that their protest was peaceful, and they urged the Chinese authorities to stop their crackdown on Tibetans in Lhasa and other Tibetan areas,” a witness said.

“They also expressed solidarity with those Tibetans who protested in Lhasa, Labrang, and others outside Tibet. They had a banner that read, ‘We stand together with Tibetans, for glorious democracy and life.’”

In Machu county, Gannan, also in Gansu province, hundreds of Tibetans, mostly lay people, marched to county government buildings shouting “Long live the Dalai Lama!” and carrying a portrait of the Dalai Lama.

In Sichuan, “the situation is very tense,” said one Tibetan resident.

“On March 15, there were protests in Kham Tawo [in Chinese, Daofu] in Ganzi prefecture. Suddenly 10 armed police trucks arrived…Kham Sershul monastery was surrounded. They are patrolling streets and randomly checking identification,” the source said……. (more details from Radio Free Asia)

Posted in China, Gansu, Ningxia, NW China, Qinghai, Sichuan, SW China | Comments Off on Protests Spread From Tibet to Western China, Many Shot to Deaths

40 House Church Leaders Detained in Central China, One Pastor Imprisoned in NW

Posted by Author on December 1, 2007


China Aid Association (CAA) , U.S, Nov 27 2007-

Midland, Texas (Nov. 27, 2007)- CAA learned that forty church leaders from China Gospel Fellowship were detained on November 18, 2007. One House Church pastor was sentenced to 18 months imprisonment in Gansu province for writing and distributing Christian literatures among Muslim believers.

According to one eyewitness, at 5:00 pm on November 18, a group of PSB officers from Xiancheng county, Henan raided a House Church leadership meeting in Peichang village, Fanhu town. The PSB detained 40 leaders immediately. 21 of them were released before November 24 and 19 are still being detained at the county detention center.

Family members of the 19 detainee were notified by the Police Department to send blankets and 360 yuan ($50) for 15 days’ living expenses. All of the detainees are seninor leaders from one of China’s largest house church groups called China Gospel Fellowship (CGF). Among them, Pastor Shen Yiping is the founder of CGF. The leaders were having a bible study when they were raided. They are from different counties of Henan province.

CAA has also learned that Pastor Liu Huiwen was sentenced to 18 months of prison by Gansu Dongxiang Nationality Autonomous County People’s Court on October 25, 2007.

Liu was detained on April 28, 2007 after distributing flyers at a funeral and was arrested on May 31, 2007. The bill of indictment from Dongxiang County Procuratorate charges that defendant Liu Huiwen committed the crime of publishing a discriminating work and insulting people of ethnic minorities when he distributed a flyer called “A Letter to Our Muslim Friends.”

Click here for the full text of the sentence paper here http://www.monitorchina.org/english_site/document_details.php?id=5125

The defense counsel for pastor Liu, Beijing attorney Li Dunyong countered that Liu’s public letter does not contain any discrimination or insults against people of ethnic minorities; that it was not intended for the people of ethnic minorities; that Liu Huiwen does not have any subjective intent to insult the people of ethnic minorities; that it is a case of minor circumstance and that the conduct of the defendant has not exceeded the boundary set for freedom of speech though the letter contains some inappropriate wording. All these arguments by the defense were rejected by the court.

China Aid believes the trial of Pastor Liu Huiwen was not fair and the 18-month heavy sentence of Pastor Liu Huiwen for distributing a flyer whose content was all legal is a barbarious attempt by the Chinese authorities to stem the growth of Christianity that is expanding in China.

China Aid also urges the Christians worldwide and governments concerned about this case to pressure the Chinese authorities to retry the case through strict and accurate interpretation of the relevant Chinese law.

Original report from Chinaaid.org

Posted in Central China, China, Christianity, Freedom of Belief, Gansu, Henan, Human Rights, Law, News, NW China, People, Politics, Religion, Religious, Social, World | Comments Off on 40 House Church Leaders Detained in Central China, One Pastor Imprisoned in NW

260 Kindergarten Children Hospitalized after Food Poisoning in China

Posted by Author on September 28, 2007


By Xin Fei, Epoch Times Staff, Sep 27, 2007-

Two hundred and sixty children from a kindergarten in Wuwei City, Gansu Province, were hospitalized due to food poisoning, according to a report by Xinhua News Agency published on September 21.

An employee of Shiyan Kindergarten confirmed the incident, but said the number of sick children were not as high as reported. When asked about the exact number of victims and the cause of the incident, the employee only answered, “We are not allowed to accept any interviews.” The manager of the kindergarten has been out of touch since the accident.

Wuwei City Public Security Bureau also confirmed the incident but refused to reveal any details. According to the employee who answered the phone, it would be up to “orders from above” when the details can be publicized.

The Chinese Communist Party usually categorizes food poisoning as “negative news” that should be avoided. Investigation outcomes for such incidents are not normally disclosed to the public, and people rarely find out if the officials in charge are punished. The unusually publicized report of this particular case by Xinhua News Agency has inspired suspicion that the situation is very serious.

Ma Xiaoming, a former news reporter of Shanxi Province TV Station, says this suggests the incident became so serious that the authorities were unable to cover it up. This incident affected more than 200 children and their families. The news spread quickly through their parents, hospitals, and sanitation units.

Usually, if it is able to, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) would cover up and deceive the public, says Ma. If not, it would deal with the incident in a low-key manner or emphasize how effectively the government has handled the situation, so as to claim it as their “political achievement.” The authorities, instead of seriously taking their responsibilities, are mainly concerned with how to use the incidents to gild their images, says Ma.

According to Ma, food poisonings with various levels of risk and scales have been happening in China with high frequency.

“What we see from the news are only a few of the many cases,” he says.

“Food poisonings such as the accident in the kindergarten have occurred in many other places. I have several former classmates who have informed me of food poisonings in their schools.”

As for the causes, Ma comments, “There are most likely two possibilities. The first is some people are not content with society or the authorities, so they take revenge by releasing poison into people’s foods. The other possibility is that the food itself may be out-of-date, contaminated, or adulterated with extra doses of antibiotics, antiseptics, food coloring, or even toxic chemicals in the manufacturing process.”

Whichever scenario, Ma Xiaoming believes the Chinese communist regime should take the blame, because the regime has destroyed the social morality and decency in China, and has intensified social conflicts, which have resulted in numerous tragedies and calamities.

Zeng Ning, a news commentator from Guizhou Province, says that the reason behind the repeated food poisoning cases is deeply rooted in the current economic and political system.

Driven solely by economic interests, the supervising organizations pay no attention to food quality, which allows the low-quality and even counterfeit products to spread far and wide, Zeng Ning says.

Chinese residents do not have the right to be informed of, speak out against, or monitor what the authorities do. The root of the tragedies is the corruption and incompetency of the authorities, Zeng Ning says.

“Investigation outcomes are never disclosed,” remarks Zeng Ning.

“The incident usually ends without any follow up actions. The public never knows if the officials in charge are punished.”

– Original report from the Epochtimes: 260 Children Hospitalized after Food Poisoning in China

Posted in censorship, Children, China, Food, Gansu, Health, Incident, Life, Media, News, NW China, People, Politics, World | 2 Comments »

China: 7 Tibetan Teenage Students Detained on Suspicion of Writing pro-Tibetan Independence Slogans

Posted by Author on September 21, 2007


Human Rights Watch,  September 20, 2007-

(New York, September 20, 2007) – The Chinese government should immediately release seven Tibetan high school students detained on suspicion of writing pro-Tibetan independence slogans on buildings, Human Rights Watch said today. One of the detainees, aged 14, is reported to have been badly beaten during or after the arrest and was bleeding profusely when last seen by relatives.

The seven male students, all from nomad families, are studying at the Amchok Bora village secondary school, in Xiahe (Labrang) county, Gannan prefecture in Gansu province. Four of the boys are 15 years old and three are14. Gannan is designated as one of China’s official “Tibetan autonomous” areas.

Human Rights Watch said that police detained some 40 students on or around September 7. The students were alleged to have written slogans calling for the return of the Dalai Lama and a free Tibet the previous day on the walls of the village police station and on other walls in the village. Within 48 hours, all but seven of the students were released from police custody. Police reportedly also questioned school staff about the slogan-writing graffiti incident.

“Arresting teenagers for a political crime shows just how little has changed in Tibet,” said Brad Adams, Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “Beating up a child for a political crime shows just how far China has to go before it creates the ‘harmonious society’ China’s leaders talk so much about.”

The students were initially held in a police station in Amchok Bora, and allowed to see their families. However, on September 10, plainclothes officials believed to be state security moved them to the nearby county town of Xiahe (Labrang), east of the village. Shortly before the children were moved from the village, police had reportedly refused permission for the relatives to take the injured boy for medical treatment. Officials in Xiahe have since refused to reveal the students’ location or even to confirm that they are in custody…… ( more details from Human Rights Watch’s report: China: Tibetan Schoolboys Detained as Crackdown Worsens)

Posted in China, Freedom of Belief, Freedom of Speech, Gansu, Human Rights, Law, News, NW China, People, Politics, Religion, Social, Student, teenager, Tibetan, World | 1 Comment »

Parts of China’s Great Wall Swept Away by Sandstorms

Posted by Author on August 30, 2007


Chris Gill in Shanghai, The Guardian, August 30, 2007-

The Great Wall of China, built to withstand raiding hordes from the steppes, is now in peril from a far more insidious threat: sandstorms generated by desertification in the country’s north-west.

The wall was built over several dynasties and despite its failure to prevent invasions, it has become a national symbol. Each dynasty favoured different construction methods, and a 40-mile section built during the Han dynasty, which used mostly packed earth bricks, is now being swept away.

The state news agency Xinhua has reported that sections of the wall are being turned into “mounds of dirt” by sandstorms, the after-effects of decades of agricultural malpractice.

An estimated 25 miles of wall have already been eroded. “Frequent storms not only eroded the mud, but also cracked the wall and caused it to collapse or break down,” archaeologist Zhou Shengrui told Xinhua.

The area disappearing is in China’s remote and arid Gansu province, formerly on the edge of the Chinese empire, and the gateway to the Silk Road.

The wall has been threatened by numerous dangers over the years, many a sign of China’s rampant economic and social development.

Ravers and migrant workers using the wall as a toilet, souvenir hunters, tourists scratching graffiti into the stonework, and the constant theft of masonry by itinerant farmers, have all contributed to the destruction of China’s most famous landmark.

China recently issued regulations for the protection of the Great Wall.

The state bureau of cultural relics is conducting a study of the wall using aerial remote sensing equipment, simple tape measures, GPS systems and photography, to find out its precise length.

Chinese scholars say the actual wall left standing is now around 1,500 miles long, down from its high of an estimated 3,900 miles in the Ming dynasty.

Remote sensing showed that Beijing originally had 391 miles of Great Wall, of which only 114 miles are now visible, the journal China Geography reported in January this year.

Parts of the wall have been rebuilt during the two millennia since it was first constructed. In one of its more disastrous episodes towards the end of the Ming dynasty, soldiers dismantled sections of the wall to build farms and villages.

According to Xinhua, conservationists in Gansu plan to bury the wall to protect it, and to plant vegetation to prevent further erosion.

– Original report from The Guardian: Sandstorms sweep away parts of China’s Great Wall

Posted in Beijing, China, Chinese Culture, disaster, Environment, Gansu, Heritage, News, NW China, the Great Wall, World | Comments Off on Parts of China’s Great Wall Swept Away by Sandstorms

Raped By Teachers in China: Nightmares for Young Girls

Posted by Author on August 15, 2007


ChinaScope, 08/12/2007-

In China, teaching has always been regarded as a highly respectable and honorable profession. However, in recent years, the number of teachers who rape and harass young students has increased, thus tarnishing that image.

On Jan 1, 2005, the New York Times reported that an elementary school teacher, Li Guang in Xinji, Gansu raped 26 students, the oldest of them being 14.

In 2003, the Chinese Ministry of Education reported 10 cases in which treachers in multiple provinces raped students.

In June 2007, a middle school teacher in Tongwei, Gansu was executed for raping 18 female students. These cases reflect the shift in moral values from traditional Chinese culture to Chinese Communist Party culture.

13-year-old girl Na Li’s Cases:

On March 10, 2005, 13-year-old Na Li’s life changed dramatically. Na was a student at the Puliqiao middle school in Lengshuitan district, Yongzhou City, Hunan. She had been living with her grandmother since her father’s death and her mother’s re-marriage. [1]

While she was doing math, her chief class teacher Junwei Wang took her to the hall and said, “The principals are not satisfied with your grades. You need my help to get good grades.”

Wang asked her which courses she did not pass last semester. Na answered, “English and Biology.”

Wang then asked her to bring her Biology and English books to his room. He took her to the bedroom, opened the Biology book to the chapter on female physiology and asked whether she knew where her body part was located. Na flushed, but Wang told her, “Don’t be shy in front of your teacher. Let me point to where it is.” He then stripped off her pants and raped her, warning her not to tell anyone.

On March 14, while in the physical education class, Wang told her that she was appointed the commissary for the PE class, and asked her to go to his room to write down her duties. Once in his room, he raped her again.

Na was under extreme fear. She went to her mother’s house and cried for days, but would not tell her mother what happened. Her mother persuade her to go back to school, where Wang attempted to rape her a few more times, but she refused to go to his room again. She became silent, sluggish, was in a trance state, and declined physically until she was very sick.

Wang also raped or harassed 7 other students. On December 25, 2005, several of them left school and home, which led Wang’s crimes surfacing. However, he was only sentenced to 5 years with the excuse that “the crimes were not so bad,” because he “did not rape them many times.” [1]

“A Nightmare for 26 Pupils”

On Jan 1, 2005, an article titled “Rape in China: A Nightmare for 26 Pupils” appeared in the New York Times. An elementary school teacher, Guang Li, raped 26 female students in his class. “The teacher always sent a girl to buy his cigarettes. He left the class unsupervised and waited in his office. When the girl returned to class with flushed cheeks and tousled hair, the other students said nothing.” [2]

“School is where our children learn,” said Cheng Junyin, the mother of a 14-year-old victim. “We thought it was the safest place for them.”

Quite a few similar cases have been exposed recently.

From Year 1998 to 2002
In 2002, a teacher, Daqing Ren, from Huiyao elementary school in Jiuquan City, Gansu was sentenced to death for raping 7 and harassing 6 female students. Of them 7 were under the age of 14. His death sentence was suspended. [3]

From 1999 to 2002, an elementary school teacher, Feng Su, raped and harassed 19 female students under 14 in the classroom, the water house of the school and his home. He told them, “I will kill you if you let others know.” He was executed in March 2003. His father, a district representative of China’s National People’s Congress, was also sentenced to two years for hiding his criminal son.

Su often gave the pupils extra lessons until 6-7 p.m. free of charge, visited students at home, appeared very polite and smiled sweetly. Therefore the parents had a good impresson of him and felt he was “diligent and responsible.”

When the children swore at him and hid from him when he visited, the parents thought their children were “ignorant” and scolded or beat them. [4]

In 2003, the Chinese Ministry of Education published a notifice that teachers had raped students in multiple provinces during the years from 1998 to 2002. [5]

The notifice mentioned 10 cases of theachers raping students in Liaoning, Jilin and other Provinces. Two of the criminals were executed. In addition, the principals of the schools and the education department officials were fired; the Party secretaries of the education department and the town were expelled from the Party and fired.

Year 2004

In January 2004, an elementary school teacher Guan Lin in Beiliu, Guangxi was sentenced to death for raping 4 female students. Those girls were only 9 to 12 years old. [7]

On June 8, 2004, in Linxia County in Gansu Province, a teacher from the Lujia elementary school, Huisheng Zhao, was arrested for raping and harassing 9 female students in his class. The oldest of them was under 15; the others were only 9 to 10 years old. One of them was raped about 100 times, as often as once a week. [6]

Year 2005

In December 2005, an elementary school teacher, Hongxian Liang, in Nanning City, Guangxi was executed for raping and harassing 14 students from 2003 to 2005. Most of them were only 7 to 8 years old. [8]

Year 2007

In January 2007, a teacher, Wu, in an elementary school in Luzai City, Guangxi was arrested for raping two 8-year-old female students. The teacher had been awarded “model” teacher 4 times and in 2006 had been promoted to advanced teacher. [9]

A middle school teacher, Laifu Cheng, in Changhe Town, Dingxi City, Gansu raped 18 students more than 70 times from 2001 to 2005. [10]

Sensitive Topic

According to the New York Times, the Chinese authorities are very sensitive to negative publicity and have limited the media from reporting these rapes [2]. Especially before the 17th National People’s Congress of the Chinese Communist Party, they have tinghtened control of the media. The guideline is to post “positive” reports as the mainstream and limit negative reports so as to create an impression of a “harmonious society.” [11-16]

A result of the Chinese Communist Party’s effort

According to the values of traditional Chinese culture, “promiscuous sex is number one of 10,000 evils.” Throughout China’s long history, there are no records of young students being raped or harassed.

Since 1949, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has launched numerous campaigns, including the Cultural Revolution, whose purpose was to destroy traditional Chinese culture and replace it with its own. It has promoted hatred, fighting and class struggle (for more details, refer to the sixth of the Nine Commentaries on the Communist Party [17]). China has become more and more erotic, and CCP officials appear to be leaders in the spread of pornography.

According to one study, 95% of the high-ranking officials had a second wife. Porn websites have proliferated and even wife swapping has become common [18-19].

Notes:
[1]~[19] Please check Original report from ChinaScope.Org : Nightmares for Young Girls in China: Increasing Cases of Elementary and Middle School Teachers Raping Students

Posted in Asia, Children, China, Education, Family, Gansu, Guangxi, Health, Hunan, Jilin, Law, Liaoning, Life, Nanning, NE China, News, NW China, People, Report, Social, South China, Student, World | Comments Off on Raped By Teachers in China: Nightmares for Young Girls

China Modern Torture Methods (9) – Forced Abortions

Posted by Author on February 6, 2007


The Falun Gong Human Rights Working Group

Evidence has surfaced of over 100 torture methods being employed against Falun Gong practitioners in China’s labour camps, detention centers, and mental hospitals.

Torture Methods (9) – Forced Abortionsforced abortion

The Chinese laws and codes explicitly prohibit the jailing of pregnant women.

(photo right: demonstration: Forced Abortion)

However, with the instructions from the central government that, “No measure is too excessive [when dealing with] Falun Gong,” the Chinese police not only regularly jail pregnant Falun Gong practitioners, but also use their pregnancy to force them to choose between their un-born children and their practice of Falun Gong.

Listed below are only a few cases we have confirmed.

Cases

A. Pregnant Falun Gong Practitioners Who Suffered Forced Abortions

1. Liu Qiuhong, 39, employee of Zhongce Pharmacy Company, resident of Yantai City, Shandong Province, in East China

Ms. Liu Qiuhong was arrested at her home by the Zhifu District Police Station of Yantai City, merely because she practiced Falun Gong.

Ms. Liu was more than eight months pregnant at the time. The police, however, tied her down and forcefully induced an early labor.

The baby was born alive and healthy, and was crying when the police forced it from her womb.

The authorities did not even allow Ms. Liu any time to recover. They immediately sent her to an Anti-Falun Gong Brainwashing Center for one month, and then sentenced her to a forced labor camp.

No one knows what became of the child.

2. Wang Hongmei, Ph. D. candidate in the History Department, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou City, Gansu Province, North-west China

On June 7, 2001, police from the Lanzhou University Police Station arrested Ms. Wang Hongmei merely because she refused to stop practicing Falun Gong. She was sent to the Taoshuping Detention Center in Lanzhou City, where she went on a hunger strike to protest her detention.

Because she was pregnant at the time, she was sent back to her dorm at Lanzhou University and placed under surveillance.

The university authorities pressured her to renounce and defame Falun Gong. Ms. Wang refused, and as a result they escorted her back to the detention center.

There the police cruelly subjected her to a forced abortion.

3. Zhang Wuying, a teacher at Changzhou City’s Technology Education Institute, resident of Changzhou City, Jiangsu Province, in South China

Ms. Zhang Wuying and her husband went to the central government in early April 2000 to appeal for an end to the persecution of Falun Gong practitioners. Although she was more than 4 months pregnant, over twenty police-men beat and kicked her and her husband in front of the State Appeal’s Office.

When Ms. Zhang was 5 months pregnant, Officer Li from the Cuizhu Police Station ordered the principal of her school, Li Minmin, to send her to the Military 102 Mental Hospital to have an abortion.

There, she was tied to a bed, injected with a labor-inducing drug, and force-fed some unknown drugs. The forced-abortion failed.

Just before Ms. Zhang gave birth, the police detained her husband for 40 days, leaving no one to take care of her at home. Even when she gave birth to a son in a hospital at the end of August 2000, she was under constant police surveillance.

On February 8, 2001, when Ms. Zhang and her husband came back from visiting their parents in Shandong Province, the Changzhou City Police arrested them at the Chang-zhou Railway Station.

The police injured her son’s head and legs during the forceful arrest. The police also threatened to send Ms. Zhang to a labor camp when her son reached one year of age.

B. Pregnant Falun Gong Practitioners Suffer Miscarriages Due to Torture and Hard Labor

1. Dou Jianhua, 28, kindergarten teacher, resident of Mishan City, Heilongjiang Province

In June 2000, Ms. Dou Jianhua went to Beijing to appeal to the government to stop the persecution of Falun Gong, and was arrested and escorted back to the Beishan Detention Center in Lianzhushan Town.

When the police noticed that Ms. Dou was pregnant, they forced her to load heavy bricks, which required repetitive kneeling and bending. This caused Ms. Dou massive bleeding, which resulted in a miscarriage.

The police extorted 2,000 Yuan from Ms. Dou’s family in exchange for her release.

However, less than a week later, the police came and took Ms. Dou back to the detention center.

2. Jiang Zhongli, 25, employee of the Hengyang Blood Bank, resident of Hengyang City, Hunan Province

In January 2000, Ms. Jiang Zhongli was ar-rested for her practice of Falun Gong.

She was pregnant at the time. She was detained in the Hengyang City Detention Center. To force her to renounce Falun Gong, the guards at the detention center frequently beat her.

In early February 2000, the guards savagely beat Ms. Jiang again, causing her to hemorrhage and miscarry.

Even then, the police refused to give Ms. Jiang any medical treatment, and they let her health deteriorate to a critical condition.

Afraid that she would die in the detention center, the police extorted 1,500 Yuan from Ms. Jiang’s family in exchange for her release.

Ms. Jiang is currently under house arrest.

More cases of Forced Abortions can be found from here .

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Related:
China: 2508 Family Members’ Open Letter Expose Torture, the Epoch Times, Dec 11, 2006
Lawyer’s 3rd open letter urge China to stop the Brutality(1), December 12, 2005, Gao Zhisheng

Posted in Children, China, Crime against humanity, East China, Falun Gong, Forced Abortion, Gansu, Health, Heilongjiang, Human Rights, Hunan, Jiangsu, Labor camp, Lanzhou, Law, NE China, News, NW China, People, Police, Politics, Religion, Religious, SE China, Shandong, Social, South China, Special report, Torture, Women | 1 Comment »

China Leader Admitted for First Time Regime is Facing Crisis

Posted by Author on January 16, 2007


By Luo Bing, Chengming Monthly Magazine (Chinese), Hongkong, Jan. 1, 2007-

Chinese President Hu Jingtao admitted recently that the Chinese Communist PartyCover, Chengming Monthly, Jan. 1, 2007 (CCP) regime is facing three unprecedented crises: A political crisis, a crisis revolving around social infrastructure, and a crisis concerning overall governance within the regime. Among them, the crisis of governance is the most threatening.

CCP is Faced With Three Unprecedented Crises

It was at the Annual Conference of the 12th Central Committee Political Bureau of 2006 that Hu admitted to the enormous pressure that the ruling party is facing. This pressure comes in the form of three unprecedented crises. These are: a political crisis, a social infrastructure crisis, and a crisis concerning governance. All three of these crises are triggered by and amplified by one another, creating a very difficult situation.

Among the three crises, the one revolving around governance of the regime is most serious. Hu wasted no time in pointing out that the most serious and urgent issue the CCP is facing is the implementation of the party’s principles and policies to the entire country. This is critical in that it is needed to check, reverse, and ultimately solve the crisis. It is directly related to the country’s fate, the interests of 1.3 billion people, and the vitality of the party as a ruling party.

Vice Premier Wu Banguo said at the meeting that the escalation of the governance crisis at the local level had all but destroyed the stability of society, economic development, financial order, and any potential for a harmonious relationship between the people and the government.

Disclosures: 200 to 250 reports regarding political issues, social stability, or accidents submitted by local governments account for half of the various reports every day.

A new trend has appeared recently, which is, more reports are about superstructure, democratic parties, and appealing events in religious circles. For example, legal proceedings against various party committees and government departments are used to put the heads of the respective government departments and legal departments into a passive state.

Premier Wen Jiabao said, “Lawsuits against the party or its government organs from all circles reflect not only the progress in the legal system and its law-making procedures, but also the administrative gap between the party, government organizations, and the law, which serves to worsen the crisis in governance.”

Summary of the 31-Province Questionnaire on CCP and its Organizations

The assessment questionnaire of CCP and its organizations of the 31 provinces, autonomous regions and the municipalities directly under the central government are summarized below:

(1) None of them are listed as Category 1 (good, very good, very satisfied), or Category 2 (good, satisfactory).

(2) Category 3 (normal) consists of: Beijing City, Tianjin City, Jiangsu Province, Zhejiang Province and the Tibet Autonomous Region. Ningxia Muslim Autonomous Region, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region and Hainan Province.

(3) Category 4 (unsatisfactory, bad) consists of: Liaoning Province, Jilin Province, Guangdong Province, Fujian Province, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Shanghai City, Shandong Province, Sichuan Province, Guizhou Province, Gansu Province and other provinces.

(4) Category 5 (very dissatisfied, poor) consists of: Hebei Province, Shanxi Province, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, Heilongjiang Province, Anhui Province, Jiangxi Province, Henan Province, Hubei Province, Hunan Province, Chongqing City, Shaanxi Province, Yunnan Province and Qinghai Province. Among them, Henan, Anhui, Shanxi, Hunan received very low points. In the provinces (autonomous regions) which are classified as Category 5 (very dissatisfied, poor), city government, police officers, and the legal system are going through judicial darkness and collusion with the business sector. The society is chaotic and wide gaps have developed between the rich and the poor, resulting in fierce, often violent protests.

The Central Committee of the CCP dispatched teams to 19 provinces (autonomous regions) in light of the current situation.

Central Authorities Have Introduced New Plan For Dealing with Social Gatherings

The Central Committee and State Council of the CCP recently promulgated a number of regulations detailing ways to strictly deal with group activities.

It includes five topics in total. It stresses that the accidents resulting from local governments’ violation of regulations and policies made by the Central Committee of the CCP would be investigated for dereliction of duty. If large-scale protests occur and cause casualties and economic losses, the corresponding people in the local government must be held responsible for serious misconduct and receive criminal prosecution.

The so-called “scale” criterion means above 5000 people in the provincial cities and above 2,000 people in other cities are involved in an accident, or above 20 people wounded, including five or more death in an accident, or with economic losses( direct and indirect) of more than 20 million yuan (about U.S. $ 2.5 million).

———————
Chengming Monthly Magazine (Chinese) is the most widely read political magazine published in Hong Kong.
– This Article translated from Chinese by the Epochtimes

Posted in Anhui, Beijing, Central China, China, Chongqing, Communist Party, East China, Fujian, Gansu, Guangdong, Guangxi, Hainan, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Incident, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Jilin, Law, Liaoning, NE China, News, Ningxia, North China, NW China, Politics, Protest, Qinghai, SE China, Shaanxi, Shandong, shanghai, Shanxi, Sichuan, Social, South China, SW China, Xinjiang, Yunnan, Zhejiang | Comments Off on China Leader Admitted for First Time Regime is Facing Crisis

Airports closed, thousands stranded by China fog

Posted by Author on December 27, 2006


Reuters, Dec. 26, 2006-

BEIJING, Dec 26 (Reuters) – Thousands of passengers across eastern, northern and central China have been stranded after heavy fog closed airports and hundreds of flights were cancelled, state media said on Tuesday.

Highways were also closed and in some cities, such as Lanzhou in the northwest, authorities issued pollution alerts and warned people not to go outside as smog had worsened the situation, Xinhua said.

“In some provinces, people are advised to wear masks as the heavy smog contains pollutants like carbon monoxide,” Xinhua said.

Airports in Nanjing, Hangzhou and Hefei in China’s east and Jinan in the north either closed completely or cancelled most flights, it said, stranding around 20,000 people.

“No flights have taken off since this morning,” an official at Nanjing airport said by telephone, adding he not know when the situation would return to normal.

The fog is expected to dissipate as freezing air from Siberia moves across China, Xinhua said, though temperatures would fall by up to 10 degrees Celcius (50 degrees Fahrenheit)

Two people died in road accidents caused by the poor weather, the official Xinhua news agency said.

original report here

Posted in air, Anhui, Central China, China, East China, Environment, Gansu, Hangzhou, Health, Hefei, Lanzhou, Life, Nanjing, News, North China, People, pollution, Social, travel, Zhejiang | Comments Off on Airports closed, thousands stranded by China fog