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    Reporters Without Borders said in it’s 2005 special report titled “Xinhua: the world’s biggest propaganda agency”, that “Xinhua remains the voice of the sole party”, “particularly during the SARS epidemic, Xinhua has for last few months been putting out news reports embarrassing to the government, but they are designed to fool the international community, since they are not published in Chinese.”
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Archive for the ‘Macao’ Category

China: Return to outdated rules for Hong Kong and Macau journalists

Posted by Author on February 11, 2009


Reporters Without Borders, 6 February 2009 –

Reporters Without Borders
deplores the fact that the more relaxed regulations for the foreign press that were introduced for the Olympic Games will no longer apply to Hong Kong and Macau journalists visiting the mainland although they have been maintained for foreign journalists. The Chinese authorities have told the Hong Kong Journalists Association (HKJA) that reporters from Hong Kong and Macau must obtain a press card from an official body in order to work on the mainland and must request permission from the authorities before every trip into the interior, much as they did before the more new regulations took effect.

“Why are journalists from Hong Kong and Macau being treated less well than foreign journalists?” Reporters Without Borders asked. “It is inexplicable. We urge the Chinese authorities not to return to the past in this way, reversing one of the few positive effects of the Olympic Games.”

Reporters Without Borders has just published an evaluation of the human rights situation in China six months after inauguration of the Olympic Games on 8 August.

It was the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office of China’s State Council that today announced that journalists from the two special administrative regions would no longer enjoy the freedoms that were introduced for the Olympic Games period. They will now have to obtain a press card from the All-China Journalists Association (the official union) before working on the mainland, and they will have to show the card before interviewing Chinese citizens. The will also have to notify the authorities before travelling.

According to the government news agency Xinhua, the new regulations state that: “Journalists from Hong Kong and Macau must abide by national laws and journalism ethics and should carry out coverage objectively and fairly.”

Mak Yin-ting, a journalist and former general secretary of the HKJA, said: “In principle, it is unfair. In practice, it will depend on the good will of the authorities. In either case, it is not normal that this should be worse than the Olympic regulations”. Tam Chi-keung, the HKJA’s current chairperson, told Reuters: “This is returning to the old ways … this cannot fulfil the actual needs of Hong Kong and Macao journalists.”

A Hong Kong journalist who often visits the mainland told Reporters Without Borders: “The impact on our work depends on the way the local authorities apply it. I fear that, as regards sensitive stories, this will prevent us from doing our reporting properly. There could be a restrictive attitude during this coming year, which is a sensitive one.” The Foreign Correspondents Club of China (FCCC) told Reporters Without Borders that, if confirmed, this decision would be very disturbing and contrary to the open attitude displayed by the Chinese authorities during and after the Olympic Games.

Reporters Without Borders

Posted in Beijing Olympics, China, Freedom of Speech, Hong kong, Human Rights, Journalist, Macao, Media, News, People, Politics, Press freedom, Sports, World | Comments Off on China: Return to outdated rules for Hong Kong and Macau journalists

China, national security and a tale of two cities

Posted by Author on November 28, 2008


By Tom Mitchell in Hong Kong and Justine Lau in Macao, The Financial Times, November 26 2008 –

Macao and Hong Kong, China’s two special administrative regions, speak the same dialect, watch the same television programmes and are just an hour away from each other by ferry. But when it comes to politics, the two cities are a world apart.

Five years ago a debate over national security legislation mandated by article 23 of the Basic Law, Hong Kong’s mini-constitution, rocked the territory’s political establishment. On Sunday in Macao, fewer than 100 people attended a rally against a similar law.

“It is always stressful to oppose the government in Macao because it is such a small place,” said Au Kam-san, a Macao legislator. “If your boss sees you march and doesn’t like it, you may lose your job.”

“I am not joining,” Ms Chan, a housewife, said as she walked past the demonstration. “I don’t really know anything about politics. I am happy as long as my husband and my two children have jobs and pay rises.”

In Hong Kong five years ago, opposition to article 23 legislation, a severe economic slump and the unpopularity of Hong Kong’s first Chinese chief executive, Tung Chee-hwa, inspired more than 500,000 people to take to the streets in protest. It was the beginning of a period of political turmoil that forced the Hong Kong government to scrap the proposed national security measures and led to the resignations of Hong Kong’s security and finance chiefs. Mr Tung also stepped down two years later.

A stew of econ-omic and political grievance is bubbling up in Macao, however, posing a challenge to the government and its chief executive, Edmund Ho. Strains arising from rampant growth of the former Portuguese enclave’s gambling industry, the world’s largest, were already eroding popular support for Mr Ho before the economy began to turn.This month Las Vegas Sands made 11,000 people redundant after the casino operator suspended work on two construction sites.

That said, the situation remains much less explosive in Macao than it did in Hong Kong, in part because China looms a lot larger in tiny Macao.

China’s sovereign power laps at Macao’s own shores. Unlike Hong Kong, Macao does not have territorial waters and reclamation projects require special approval from Beijing. With a population of 550,000 and land area of just 29.2 sq km, the territory is so small that residents have a diminutive nickname for it: “Macao Street”. Hong Kong, by contrast, has a population of 7m spread across more than 1,100 sq km.

Hong Kong inherited a much more robust legal system and civil society from its former British colonial rulers than Macao did from Portugal, which never reasserted its authority after riots in December 1966 inspired by the Cultural Revolution. A full-scale invasion of Macao by Maoist red guards was averted only after the People’s Liberation Army mobilised to protect the then Portuguese enclave. Adding insult to injury, Macao’s colonial rulers were also forced to negotiate a humiliating truce with a pro-Beijing cabal of local labour leaders and businessmen known as the “committee of thirteen”.

Ronnie Tong, a barrister and Hong Kong legislator, got a taste of the claustrophobia on Macao Street when he travelled there on Saturday at the invitation of activists and students opposed to Mr Ho’s proposed national security laws. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Activist, China, Event, Hong kong, Human Rights, Law, Life, Macao, News, People, Politics, Rally, Social, World | 1 Comment »

China: Macau Protesters demand democracy

Posted by Author on December 20, 2007


BBC  News, Thursday, 20 December 2007-

Hundreds of people have staged a rare anti-corruption demonstration in the Chinese region of Macau.

Protesters said a lack of democracy was preventing workers from benefiting from the territory’s booming economy.

The demonstration marked the eighth anniversary of the former Portuguese colony becoming a special administrative region of China.

A senior official is currently on trial in Macau accused of taking tens of millions of dollars in bribes.

The territory’s economy relies heavily on tourism, and the expanding casino industry has brought in huge amounts of money and foreign investment.

The protesters said that without full democracy Macau’s vast gambling revenue was not reaching the workers and poorer people in society.

“Even though we have a very good economic development, without a democratic political system we will face a very serious corruption problem, and the poverty problem,” said opposition legislator Ng Kuok Cheong at the protest.

‘Democratic enough’

Macau is governed from Beijing but has a similar administrative system to that of Hong Kong and a large degree of autonomy under the “one country, two systems” principle.

The leader is chosen by a Beijing-approved committee and only 12 of the 19 legislators are directly elected.

Billionaire Stanley Ho, who had a monopoly on Macau’s casino industry until recent government reforms opened it up to foreign investors, dismissed the pro-democracy calls.

“Macau is democratic and free enough… it’s prosperous enough. Why do people need to do this?” he said.

Macau’s largest-ever corruption trial is currently under way.

Former Secretary for Transport and Public Works, Ao Man-long is accused of taking $100m (£50m) in bribes from at least three property developers in exchange for approving construction deals.

Political demonstrations are rare in Macau but in May police fired guns in to the air to break up a protest against the use of cheap foreign labour.

Macau Chief Executive Edmund Ho has not commented directly on the protests, but in a speech at a reception marking the anniversary he said he would increase transparency and communication with the Macau public.

Original report from BBC News

Posted in Asia, China, corruption, Incident, Macao, News, Politics, Social, World | Comments Off on China: Macau Protesters demand democracy

Macau Professor: How the Chinese Regime Forced Me to Spy(2)

Posted by Author on February 18, 2007


By Dr. Wang Lian, Special to The Epoch Times, Feb 15, 2007-

Dr. Wang LianEditor’s note: Dr. Wang Lian (photo left) was kidnapped in Zhu Hai City in Canton (Guangdong) Province on Sept. 12, 2006 by special agents of the Chinese regime’s notorious Public Security Bureau (PSB). After intense brainwashing Dr. Wang was forced into spying for the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) on the Hong Kong Epoch Times. He was given the mission to bring down the Hong Kong Epoch Times as soon as possible.

In the eyes of the CCP, The Epoch Times is an outspoken news agency that does not bow submissively to Chinese censorship and has significant influence on social and human rights issues in mainland China. The CCP sees it as a serious “thorn in the side” and has continuously harassed the normal operations of the Epoch Times in Hong Kong since its inception.

As a result of interference by CCP agents, The Epoch Times was suddenly in May 2005 unable to find a print shop in Hong Kong that would take its money. After the news agency established its own print shop the CCP hired thugs to break in and destroy valuable computer equipment programmed to print the newspaper. Now Dr. Wang reveals how the CCP has targeted individuals, seeking to undermine The Epoch Times from within.

After fleeing to Australia, Dr. Wang e-mailed the account below to the editors of the Hong Kong Epoch Times. Having experienced mental torments that left him wishing he were dead, Dr. Wang nonetheless wished to reveal the crimes of the CCP and to show the extent to which it will go to persecute Falun Gong and damage The Epoch Times. He believes that there are likely to be others like him and hopes that his frank account may encourage others with similar experiences to stand up and expose the truth about the vile deeds of the CCP. He adds that only by remaining true to one’s principles may one be free of fear and truly happy.

Here is the second and final part of Dr. Wang’s statement, which will appear in two installments.

**********

Statement of Dr. Wang Lian

(cont’d)

On the third morning of my detention inside a tiny room somewhere in Zhu Hai City, the three “brainwashing experts” spent several hours trying to convince me to denounce Falun Gong. Then the three men from the Public Security Bureau in Zhu Hai asked what I did for The Epoch Times in Hong Kong. This went on into the afternoon. By the end of the day, two new officials walked in. They looked like they were of a higher ranking than the ones who questioned me earlier.

They looked quite upset. “You should know what crimes you’ve committed! The Nine Commentaries on the Communist Party attacked the great Chinese Communist Party (CCP). It made the leaders of China look bad. Now everyday someone is reading articles on the website of the Hong Kong Epoch Times, where you work. Everyday, someone is reading The Epoch Times on the street. The influence is very bad. What do you think should be done? Even execution and dozens of years in prison are [punishments that are] too light [for you]!”

They kept repeating this, and I didn’t have anything to say in response. I felt that all hope was gone and I was only waiting for death.

Then they changed their tone. “After all, you’ve gone to school for that many years. How could you believe in Falun Gong? How could you believe that gods exist? What era are we in now? Let me tell you: there are no gods. If there were, why don’t you ask them to protect you?

“However, our government is very kind and forgiving. As long as you’re willing to repent, we can think about how to make up for the loss you caused. Let’s do this: first, you sign this letter of repentance.”

After several days in detention, I had been tortured mentally and worn out physically. Under their pressure, I could not bear it any longer and signed the letter of repentance against my will. The letter said that I was willing to give up practicing Falun Gong.

After I signed, they asked me to add, “I will come anytime when called, and do whatever I am asked to do.” This last line made it clear to me that their true purpose for kidnapping me was to turn me into their spy.

After I signed the repentance letter, the two officials smiled, which was rare. They asked the guards to bring me some tea and let me rest, then they left. In about half an hour, they returned, their faces flushed and their breath smelling of alcohol. They said to me with a smile, “We were happy, so we had a few drinks to celebrate.”

They asked the guards to stop monitoring me. They blindfolded me again and tried to calm me, “Don’t worry. Let’s go out and get something to eat.”

Specially Chosen

By then, it was already early morning. When we ate at the restaurant, their delight was obvious.

One of the guards told me, “Did you know? There are so many people practicing Falun Gong in Hong Kong, but our boss looked everywhere and picked you. You’re truly impressive!”

His boss, who was one of the two high-level officials who spoke with me before, said, “Yes. You started practicing Falun Gong in 1998, which was very early. You are also a Ph.D. and a technical staff member of the Hong Kong Epoch Times. All of the Falun Gong practitioners in Hong Kong trust you. Your helping us would be the best fit. We can meet frequently in the future.

“You should stop reading Falun Gong books, or else you might believe in Falun Gong again. But you can still do the exercises. If you don’t do the exercises for a long time and can’t cross your legs when meditating, others will become suspicious.

“Also, you should still read the Clearwisdom website; otherwise you will be behind in the movement of Falun Gong, and others will be suspicious, too.

“You can take a rest after the meal. We’ll send you over tomorrow afternoon. Saturday afternoon you should go to The Epoch Times office in Hong Kong. Next Wednesday, you can come back here to Zhu Hai. We will tell you where to meet Xiao Cao (Little Cao), who will be your only contact. Remember, don’t tell anyone about this, including your wife and parents.

“If you do well, you can receive permanent residency in Hong Kong sooner. If not…You are a smart one. You should know. Also, when you go to Macau, register with the school right away.”

Remorse

As prescribed, I returned to Macau on the afternoon of September 15. The first thing I did after arriving in Macau was tell the school that my problem with Customs was solved. Then I took a ferry to Hong Kong.

On the ferry, I cried. It was Falun Gong that taught me to live according to the principles of Truthfulness, Compassion, and Tolerance and to be considerate of others. It changed me from short-tempered to patient. It gave my whole family good health. Yet I had given it up. What hurt me even more was that I had become a spy. I would soon betray the good people who worked with me. I felt that I could not take it anymore. I needed to let someone know. I could not really depart from my faith in Falun Gong.

When the ferry arrived in Hong Kong, I told another practitioner, Auntie Sun, about everything. She said I should try to go abroad as soon as possible. That evening, I also told my wife.

On Sept.16, I went to The Epoch Times office as usual. However, I didn’t want to speak with anyone. I felt very guilty. Even a smile or a small gesture from another person would make me panic.

On Sept. 18, Xiao Cao emailed me and asked me to meet him at the Jidazhongtian Hotel in Zhu Hai. He left his full name as Cao Yunfeng. On Sept. 20, I met him at the lobby of the hotel. He took me to a room in the hotel, where one of the high-level officials and one of his subordinates who had interrogated me were.

After we sat down and chit-chatted a little, the high-level official said, “You don’t have to feel guilty. Working for us is working for the Party and for the nation. It is most glorious and honorable. If you do well, it shouldn’t take more than a few months for you to get permanent residency in Hong Kong.”

I told him, “I am really nervous. When I went to The Epoch Times office in Hong Kong, I felt as though I was a thief and felt very uncomfortable.”

The high-level official said, “Don’t worry about it. They won’t do anything to you. Just take your time. Remember you are serving the Party and the country. You should feel proud.”

Undermine The Epoch Times

Next the high-level official told me my top order. “You must undermine The Epoch Times Hong Kong branch from within. Think and plan carefully before you take any action.”

He told me to spend more time chatting with Epoch Times personnel and steal their logins and passwords when I repair or maintain their computers. He also asked me to steal some documents from the Epoch Times servers.

One day in October, they came to Macao to meet with me. They gave me two USB portable hard drives, each with 2GB of storage and asked me to copy documents from The Epoch Times’ servers on these USB hard drives.

In the beginning of October, I went to the Epoch Times Hong Kong branch and copied the master copy of three weeks’ of editions in PDF format of the Hong Kong edition of The Epoch Times onto the USB portable hard drives. Before I handed these files to the Public Security Bureau (PSB) agents, I deleted all the editors’ names and personal information from these files. I also deleted some of the PDF files, which I didn’t want them to see, such as advertisements.

When my Hong Kong visa expired, I had no choice but to apply for a visitor’s visa for Hong Kong. Therefore, I did not enter Hong Kong for a month. When I met with the PSB agents, including the high-level official, I told them, “You don’t have to go through the trouble of coming here. You (the leader) may send an agent down here or you may give your orders via emails. Is it really necessary for us to meet so often?”

The high-level person replied, “You know what? When you were living in Hong Kong, we investigated you from Shenzhen. When you moved to Macao, we went to Zhu Hai to investigate you. It is not easy to find someone of your caliber. This is the reason why I insist on meeting you each time. Each time we drove for two hours from Shenzhen to Zhu Hai just to meet you because we want to keep helping you and making sure you no longer turn back to Falun Gong. You have been practicing Falun Gong for such a long time. If we don’t meet with you often, it is hard to say, but you might start practicing Falun Gong again.”

At the end of October, I informed the school of my decision to quit my job. The dean was puzzled about my decision and repeatedly tried to change my mind. Finally, he gave up and told me regretfully, “It is not easy to find someone of your caliber!” In November, I gave the agents the computer distribution map of The Epoch Times Hong Kong office and information about which practitioner uses which computer, but the information I gave them was not completely accurate.

On Dec. 20, I provided them with the PDF files of two already published editions of The Epoch Times. This meeting was different from the previous ones. In the past, they were not anxious, but this time they looked very anxious.

The leader asked, “What do you think is the fastest way to destroy the Epoch Times Hong Kong branch?”

I replied, “I have no idea.” He said, “You and another practitioner are in charge of maintaining the Epoch Times computers. You are already one of us. Do you think you could make the other guy leave them? If the Epoch Times computers are broken, how are they going to publish The Epoch Times while you are in Macao and the other person refuses to help? They can’t blame the Chinese Communist Party for sabotaging their publication! Ha! Ha! Ha!”

I replied, “I dare not approach him. He won’t do it.”

The leader said, “Don’t worry about it. We will make contacts with him though his friends. He is a problem. We have investigated him already. He has only entered China once for the past few years and he returned to Hong Kong on the same day. What about this? When you return to Hong Kong, socialize with him more. Buy him dinners and chat with him more. Try to find out who his family members are, where they live, and what their phone numbers are. The more information you can find out about his family, the better.”

Escape

After the meeting, I returned to Wuhan and told my parents everything. They both advised me to escape to the western world. On Jan. 1, 2007, I returned to Hong Kong and applied for a visitor’s visa for Canada and Australia.

On January 8, I got a visitor’s visa to Canada. I looked at the visa and ran on the streets in jubilation. Finally I would be able to run away from all of these troubles.

On Jan. 12, Cao Yunfeng asked me to go to Zhu Hai via email, but I didn’t reply. On Jan. 21, I finished my job in Macao. On Jan. 25, I obtained a visitor’s visa to Australia. I immediately went to the travel agent and ordered a plane ticket to leave Hong Kong right away.

However, the agent told me that there was no ticket available until Feb. 12. There might be some tickets at the end of February or I would have to wait for a canceled reservation. Finally, I got a ticket on Feb. 6 to Melbourne. My wife asked me to stay in Hong Kong for a few days to spend more time with her and to get the ticket for a later date for half the price instead.

But I couldn’t wait any longer. Since the day I had obtained the visa for Australia, I feared that they might do something to me. Every day I tied my passport stored in a small plastic bag to my abdomen because I knew I would be dead if the agents should steal my passport.

When the plane finally took off and left Hong Kong, I didn’t know if I should feel happy or worried as I stroked the passport hidden inside my clothes. I am happy to know that I no longer have to work for the CCP or sell out others or myself. I am worried about my elderly parents who are living in China. Are they going to fall into the hands of these thugs? I am worried about my wife and my son.

Wang Lian, February 10, 2007

<< previous

original report from the epochtimes

Posted in Australia, China, City resident, Falun Gong, Hong kong, Human Rights, intellectual, Law, Macao, Media, News, Newspaper, People, Politics, Religion, Religious, SE China, Social, spy, Student, World | 1 Comment »

Macau Professor: How the Chinese Regime Forced Me to Spy

Posted by Author on February 18, 2007


By Dr. Wang Lian, Special to The Epoch Times, Feb 14, 2007-

Editor’s note: Dr. Wang Lian was kidnapped in Zhu Hai City in Canton (Guangdong) Province on Sept. 12, 2006 by special agents of the Chinese regime’s notorious Public Security Bureau (PSB). After intense brainwashing Dr. Wang was forced into spying for the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) on the Hong Kong Epoch Times. He was given the mission to bring down the Hong Kong Epoch Times as soon as possible.

In the eyes of the CCP, The Epoch Times is an outspoken news agency that does not bow submissively to Chinese censorship and has significant influence on social and human rights issues in mainland China. The CCP sees it as a serious “thorn in the side” and has continuously harassed the normal operations of the Epoch Times in Hong Kong since its inception.

As a result of interference by CCP agents, The Epoch Times was suddenly in May 2005 unable to find a print shop in Hong Kong that would take its money. After the news agency established its own print shop the CCP hired thugs to break in and destroy valuable computer equipment programmed to print the newspaper. Now Dr. Wang reveals how the CCP has targeted individuals, seeking to undermine The Epoch Times from within.

After fleeing to Australia, Dr. Wang e-mailed the account below to the editors of the Hong Kong Epoch Times. Having experienced mental torments that left him wishing he were dead, Dr. Wang nonetheless wished to reveal the crimes of the CCP and to show the extent to which it will go to persecute Falun Gong and damage The Epoch Times. He believes that there are likely to be others like him and hopes that his frank account may encourage others with similar experiences to stand up and expose the truth about the vile deeds of the CCP. He adds that only by remaining true to one’s principles may one be free of fear and truly happy.

Here is the first part of Dr. Wang’s statement, which will appear in two installments.

**********

Statement of Dr. Wang Lian

Dr. Wang lian My name is Wang Lian, and I was born on April 10, 1974 in the Chinese city of Wuhan. After graduating in 1996 with my Bachelors degree in Computer Science at Wuhan University, I went to Hong Kong University for graduate study.

In 2000, under the tutelage of my supervisor, I began my PhD thesis, which I completed in June 2004.

From September 2004 to January 2007, I worked as an assistant professor at the Macau University of Science and Technology. My work consisted of lecturing to undergraduate and postgraduate Information Technology students and supervising two students who are studying for their PhD.

In September 1998, I started to practice Falun Gong in Hong Kong. Later in the same year, a friend and I established a Falun Gong exercise practice site at Hong Kong University and I went there regularly for morning exercise until September 2002, when I moved home.

From the time of July, 1999 when the CCP officially banned Falun Gong and started to persecute its practitioners, I always upheld my beliefs and actively participated in events to clarify the truth about Falun Gong in China. These included SOS rallies to rescue persecuted practitioners in China and other events to exhibit the peaceful nature of Falun Gong.

In September 2001, the Epoch Times newspaper in Hong Kong was established and I took on the role of one of the editors. Due to my teaching at the University in Macau, in September 2004 I quit my work as editor, although I still worked as a computer systems technical adviser until Feb. 5, 2007. During this time I participated in the massive rally opposing “Article 23,” a measure that would strip Hong Kong citizens of basic rights, and rallies that urge people to quit the CCP.

My student visa expired towards the end of 2002 but at the time it seemed that I would need at least another year before completing my studies. Therefore I applied to the Hong Kong and China PRC immigration department for an extension of my student visa. I quickly received a reply from the Hong Kong immigration department which accepted my visa extension application but in the mean time I received no reply from the central China PRC immigration department.

Later my mother asked a friend in Beijing to check out my application. This friend met with the official in charge of student visas, who said, “I can extend everyone’s visa but Lian Wang’s because he practices Falun Gong!” I had no choice but to leave Hong Kong in 2002 and returned to Wuhan.

As my spouse is a Hong Kong permanent resident, I was entitled to apply for a 3-month visa allowed for “visiting relatives” and I could apply for such a visa from my local immigration office in Wuhan rather than go through the central immigration office in Beijing. By repeatedly renewing my family-visit visa, I was finally able to complete my PhD in 2004.

According to the relevant law, after five years of marriage to a Hong Kong resident, I could become a Hong Kong permanent resident. Since I had married in July 2002 I would be entitled to get my Hong Kong permanent residence in July 2007. Ten months before this happened, disaster struck.

On Sept. 12, 2006, upon the request of my university faculty I went to Zhu Hai City in China to discuss a possible joint project with another university. As I was passing through customs at Gongbei I was unexpectedly detained. I was taken to a small room and two hours later ten people walked in, some were dressed in police uniforms whilst others were in casual dress.

After confirming my identity, they blindfolded me, took away my watch and mobile phone and took me by force to a van parked outside. I didn’t know how long we traveled in the van, but finally I was brought into a room and pushed to the ground.

All the windows in the room were sealed with nails and the curtains were drawn. There was a camera inside the room. Three men were waiting behind an interrogation desk. A small stool was placed in front of the desk. It was apparently for me to sit on during the interrogation.

The three told me that they were from the Public Security Bureau in Zhuhai. I asked them why I was kidnapped here and they replied, “You should know your own problems.” I told them I didn’t know and after a little while they said, “It is because you practice Falun Gong and, more to the point, because you work for The Epoch Times in Hong Kong.”

Following this I was kept under detention in this room. That is to say, everything I did, including eating, sleeping, going to the toilet and showering was done under the surveillance of at least two men. I asked them, “How long am I going to be under detention?” They said, “It could be a day or it could be six months. After six months, you could be here for another six months. It will take as long as required until we think it is appropriate to release you. Don’t you forget that we are a very special government organization. We have the authority to do this.”

Then I said, “To practice Falun Gong is my personal freedom. Through its teachings of Truthfulness, Benevolence and Tolerance my health has greatly improved, and I have become a very peaceful person. My friends feel they can trust me and think of me as a good person. What is wrong with practicing Falun Gong?

“As to my work and association with Hong Kong Epoch Times, it was done under the authority and protection of the laws of the special administrative region of Hong Kong. Since I never did any work for The Epoch Times in mainland China, then what am I guilty of? Also I went back and visited my parents in mainland China in July of this year, so why are you kidnapping me now?”

In reply to this, they took out a thick folder of letter-size paper and said “We have been investigating you for several years now. Here is your case file. We are a very special government organization. We have the authority to arrest you at any time we want. We didn’t arrest you earlier because it was not time yet. But we know very well each time you entered China and what you did in China in every trip.

“Practicing Falun Gong is not a matter of freedom of religion or personal belief. You have been cheated. It is the Chinese government’s responsibility to tell you what you should believe in and what you should not believe in. You are a citizen of the People’s Republic of China, so you must obey the Chinese government.”

“You could practice Falun Gong before the Chinese government started to suppress it. Now that the Chinese government has banned Falun Gong, you must obey the government. You must withdraw from Falun Gong at once. If you had withdrawn from Falun Gong earlier, we would not have arrested you.

“As for your work at the Epoch Times Hong Kong branch, you may think it does not violate the Hong Kong laws, but Hong Kong is part of Chinese territory. You must not attack the Chinese Communist Party. The Epoch Times Hong Kong branch is now an enemy organization. We will eradicate this organization sooner or later.” (to be cont’d…)

Next >>

original report from the epochtimes

Posted in Australia, China, City resident, Falun Gong, Hong kong, Human Rights, intellectual, Law, Macao, Media, News, Newspaper, People, Politics, Religion, Religious, SE China, Social, spy, Student, Technology, World | Comments Off on Macau Professor: How the Chinese Regime Forced Me to Spy

 
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