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U.S. considers stronger action against China’s cyberattacks

Posted by Author on February 2, 2013

High-level talks with the Chinese government to address persistent cyberattacks against U.S. companies and government agencies haven’t worked, so officials say the Obama administration is now considering a range of actions.

China-based hackers have long been an economic and national security concern, but as cybersecurity experts report an increase in attacks, U.S. leaders are looking at ways to better address the threat and analyze its impact.
Two former U.S. officials said the administration is preparing a new National Intelligence Estimate that, when complete, is expected to detail the cyberthreat, particularly from China, as a growing economic problem. One official said it also will cite more directly a role by the Chinese government in such espionage.

The official said the NIE, which reflects the views of the nation’s various intelligence agencies, will underscore the administration’s concerns about the threat, and will put greater weight on plans for more pointed diplomatic and trade measures against the Chinese government. The two former officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the classified report.

“We have to begin making it clear to the Chinese,” Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Thursday, “that the United States is going to have to take action to protect not only our government’s, but our private sector, from this kind of illegal intrusions.”

She said the U.S. must help build an international alliance against the cyberthreat and added that there is a lot the U.S. is working on “in the event that we don’t get some kind of international effort under way.” She said no specifics have been finalized.

Underscoring that widespread threat, both The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday that their computer systems had been infiltrated by China-based hackers. In both cases they said the focus was on monitoring news coverage and the reporters digging into stories the Chinese government deemed important.

Although the Obama administration hasn’t yet decided what steps it may take, actions could include threats to cancel certain visas or put major purchases of Chinese goods through national security reviews.

“The U.S. government has started to look seriously at more assertive measures and begun to engage the Chinese on senior levels,” said James Lewis, a cybersecurity expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. “They realize that this is a major problem in the bilateral relationship that threatens to destabilize U.S. relations with China.”

To date, extensive discussions between Chinese officials and top U.S. leaders — including President Barack Obama and Defense Secretary Leon Panetta — have had little impact on what government and cybersecurity experts say is escalating and technologically evolving espionage. The Chinese deny such espionage efforts.

The newly disclosed four-month long cyberattack against the Times is just the latest in a long string of breaches said to be by China-based hackers into corporate and government computer systems across the United States. Companies ranging from defense and high-tech industry leaders to Internet search leader Google have complained for years of computer network attacks that cybersecurity firms traced back to China, including allegations that some were backed or endorsed by the Beijing government.

Washingtonpost.com, Feb. 1, 2013

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